44 min

2021 Summer Interns What's work got to do with it?

    • Science

On this episode of What’s Work Got To Do With It? we highlight our 2021 Summer Intern Program at the Institute and OHWC. Each summer, undergraduate interns work with faculty mentors in basic and applied research over a three-month paid summer internship designed to introduce them to biomedical and occupational health research. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we had to make the tough decision to cancel our summer intern program last summer in 2020, so we are excited to be able to host our summer intern program for 2021 and offer undergraduate students the opportunity to work on research projects virtually this year.

We spoke to each of our 2021 Summer Interns as they share their experience working alongside institute researchers and how this experience will inform their future careers in research, clinical health, and public health.

Guests: Renee Kozlowski, Kaiyo Shi, Megan Jones, Lauren Lee, and Anika Banister
Host: Helen Schuckers, M.P.H.

Visit our Summer Intern page for more information on the application process. Applications open each year in December for the following Summer: https://www.ohsu.edu/oregon-institute-occupational-health-sciences/summer-internships

Read our Oregon and the Workplace blog on our 2021 Summer Intern poster session: https://blogs.ohsu.edu/occupational-health-sciences/2021/08/12/2021-summer-interns-virtual-poster-presentation/

Listen to our 2019 Summer Intern podcast episode: https://soundcloud.com/occhealthsci/summer-interns

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We would love your support. Please consider leaving us a review if you are enjoying our podcast.

We want to hear from you on workplace topics that you would like us to learn more about. Email us at occhealthsci@ohsu.edu.

Visit www.ohsu.edu/occhealthsci, subscribe to our Oregon and the Workplace blog, or follow us on our social media channels: facebook.com/occhealthsci.ohsu or twitter.com/ohsuocchealth to stay updated on current research, resources, news, and community events.

On this episode of What’s Work Got To Do With It? we highlight our 2021 Summer Intern Program at the Institute and OHWC. Each summer, undergraduate interns work with faculty mentors in basic and applied research over a three-month paid summer internship designed to introduce them to biomedical and occupational health research. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we had to make the tough decision to cancel our summer intern program last summer in 2020, so we are excited to be able to host our summer intern program for 2021 and offer undergraduate students the opportunity to work on research projects virtually this year.

We spoke to each of our 2021 Summer Interns as they share their experience working alongside institute researchers and how this experience will inform their future careers in research, clinical health, and public health.

Guests: Renee Kozlowski, Kaiyo Shi, Megan Jones, Lauren Lee, and Anika Banister
Host: Helen Schuckers, M.P.H.

Visit our Summer Intern page for more information on the application process. Applications open each year in December for the following Summer: https://www.ohsu.edu/oregon-institute-occupational-health-sciences/summer-internships

Read our Oregon and the Workplace blog on our 2021 Summer Intern poster session: https://blogs.ohsu.edu/occupational-health-sciences/2021/08/12/2021-summer-interns-virtual-poster-presentation/

Listen to our 2019 Summer Intern podcast episode: https://soundcloud.com/occhealthsci/summer-interns

---

We would love your support. Please consider leaving us a review if you are enjoying our podcast.

We want to hear from you on workplace topics that you would like us to learn more about. Email us at occhealthsci@ohsu.edu.

Visit www.ohsu.edu/occhealthsci, subscribe to our Oregon and the Workplace blog, or follow us on our social media channels: facebook.com/occhealthsci.ohsu or twitter.com/ohsuocchealth to stay updated on current research, resources, news, and community events.

44 min

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