1 hr 6 min

#21: Client Centered Care, Psychosis, and OT with Lauren Jones (CE Course‪)‬ OT Potential Podcast | Occupational Therapy CEUs

    • Medicine

The research we discuss on the OT Potential Podcast has a recurring theme: therapy goals should always support what is meaningful to the client.
But, lurking behind this best practice is an important question: what do we do when a patient is not of sound mind?
We’ll explore an article that hits the question head on, looking at client-centered care for patients with psychosis. It’s an especially helpful read for mental health OTs—but we can all learn something from it, since every clinician sees clients whose decision making could be perceived as impaired.
The takeaway from this article is that we can always find ways to be client-centered. And, it’s worth making the effort to do so, since it always seems to improve patient engagement and outcomes.
To help us unpack this article, it is our privilege to welcome Lauren Jones, MS, OTR/L.  Lauren currently works on an interdisciplinary team as a Senior Occupational Therapist, providing services to youth, adults, and older adults in an inpatient psychiatry setting. Together, we will discuss practical strategies for keeping your interventions client-centered, regardless of your treatment setting(s).

In order to earn credit for this course, you must take the test within the OT Potential Club.

You can find more details on this course here:
https://otpotential.com/ceu-podcast-courses/client-centered-ot

Here's the primary research we are discussing:
Moritz, S., Berna, F., Jaeger, S., Westermann, S., &; Nagel, M. (2016). The customer is always right? subjective target symptoms and treatment preferences in patients with psychosis. European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience, 267(4), 335–339.
Support the show (https://otpotential.com)

The research we discuss on the OT Potential Podcast has a recurring theme: therapy goals should always support what is meaningful to the client.
But, lurking behind this best practice is an important question: what do we do when a patient is not of sound mind?
We’ll explore an article that hits the question head on, looking at client-centered care for patients with psychosis. It’s an especially helpful read for mental health OTs—but we can all learn something from it, since every clinician sees clients whose decision making could be perceived as impaired.
The takeaway from this article is that we can always find ways to be client-centered. And, it’s worth making the effort to do so, since it always seems to improve patient engagement and outcomes.
To help us unpack this article, it is our privilege to welcome Lauren Jones, MS, OTR/L.  Lauren currently works on an interdisciplinary team as a Senior Occupational Therapist, providing services to youth, adults, and older adults in an inpatient psychiatry setting. Together, we will discuss practical strategies for keeping your interventions client-centered, regardless of your treatment setting(s).

In order to earn credit for this course, you must take the test within the OT Potential Club.

You can find more details on this course here:
https://otpotential.com/ceu-podcast-courses/client-centered-ot

Here's the primary research we are discussing:
Moritz, S., Berna, F., Jaeger, S., Westermann, S., &; Nagel, M. (2016). The customer is always right? subjective target symptoms and treatment preferences in patients with psychosis. European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience, 267(4), 335–339.
Support the show (https://otpotential.com)

1 hr 6 min