1 hr 17 min

#25) Yasushi Suko on the effect of sound on restoration and health promotion Gesunde Gestaltung

    • Design

Yasushi SUKO is a doctoral student at the Faculty of Social Sciences/Psychology, Tampere University, Finland. He studies the effects of nature experience on people, especially the restorative effect of repeatedly listening to natural sounds (e.g., birdsong, the sound of a running river, etc.). He is currently a member of the EnviWell Research Group, directed by Professor Kalevi Korpela.



 



In this episode we deep-dive into the acoustic stimuli and elaborate on the various potentials listening to specific sounds can have for health promotion, restoration and wellbeing. The roles of nature sounds are discussed and practical applications both for clinical and non-clinical contexts are investigated.



 



Time Stamps and Related References/Projects:



 



PART II:





 



04:40 Y. Suko’s interest in natural sounds originates from J.S. Bach’s (1685-1750) music and Ivan Shishkin’s (1832-1898) forest landscape paintings.



 



06:10 Y. Suko’s research on alleviating surgeons’ stress through listening to natural sounds.



 



Suko, Y., Shindo, T., Saito, K., Takayama, N., Warisawa, S., Sakuma, T., Ito, M., Kytölä, P., Nummi, T., & Korpela, K. (2022). Alleviating surgeons’ stress through listening to natural sounds in a half-encapsulated rest space after an operation: A pilot, longitudinal field study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 19(19), 12736. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191912736



 



11:28 Literature on which Y. Suko based the audio files for his studies.



 



Ratcliffe, E. (2021). Sound and soundscape in restorative natural environments: A narrative literature review. Frontiers in Psychology, 12, 570563. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2021.570563



 



Ratcliffe, E., Gatersleben, B., & Sowden, P. T. (2013). Bird sounds and their contributions to perceived attention restoration and stress recovery. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 36, 221–228. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvp.2013.08.004



 



13:20 Three theories explaining why natural sounds are restorative: attention restoration theory (ART), stress recovery theory (SRT), and conditioned restoration theory (CRT).



 



Kaplan, R., & Kaplan, S. (1989). The experience of nature: A psychological perspective. Cambridge university press.



 



Ulrich, R. S., Simons, R. F., Losito, B. D., Fiorito, E., Miles, M. A., & Zelson, M. (1991). Stress recovery during exposure to natural and urban environments. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 11(3), 201–230. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0272-4944(05)80184-7



 



Egner, L. E., Sütterlin, S., & Calogiuri, G. (2020). Proposing a framework for the restorative effects of nature through conditioning: Conditioned restoration theory. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17(18), 6792. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186792



 



21:20 PART II



 



22:35 Y. Suko’s research on the effects of faint traffic noise mixed with birdsong.



 



Suko, Y., Saito, K., Takayama, N., Warisawa, S., & Sakuma, T. (2019). Effect of faint road traffic noise mixed in birdsong on the perceived restorativeness and listeners’ physiological response: An exploratory study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 16(24), 4985. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16244985



 



33:20 Future applications of restorative natural sounds in clinical and non-clinical settings.



 



38:50 Restorative natural sounds are related to salutogenesis.



 



Antonovsky, A. (1996).

Yasushi SUKO is a doctoral student at the Faculty of Social Sciences/Psychology, Tampere University, Finland. He studies the effects of nature experience on people, especially the restorative effect of repeatedly listening to natural sounds (e.g., birdsong, the sound of a running river, etc.). He is currently a member of the EnviWell Research Group, directed by Professor Kalevi Korpela.



 



In this episode we deep-dive into the acoustic stimuli and elaborate on the various potentials listening to specific sounds can have for health promotion, restoration and wellbeing. The roles of nature sounds are discussed and practical applications both for clinical and non-clinical contexts are investigated.



 



Time Stamps and Related References/Projects:



 



PART II:





 



04:40 Y. Suko’s interest in natural sounds originates from J.S. Bach’s (1685-1750) music and Ivan Shishkin’s (1832-1898) forest landscape paintings.



 



06:10 Y. Suko’s research on alleviating surgeons’ stress through listening to natural sounds.



 



Suko, Y., Shindo, T., Saito, K., Takayama, N., Warisawa, S., Sakuma, T., Ito, M., Kytölä, P., Nummi, T., & Korpela, K. (2022). Alleviating surgeons’ stress through listening to natural sounds in a half-encapsulated rest space after an operation: A pilot, longitudinal field study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 19(19), 12736. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191912736



 



11:28 Literature on which Y. Suko based the audio files for his studies.



 



Ratcliffe, E. (2021). Sound and soundscape in restorative natural environments: A narrative literature review. Frontiers in Psychology, 12, 570563. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2021.570563



 



Ratcliffe, E., Gatersleben, B., & Sowden, P. T. (2013). Bird sounds and their contributions to perceived attention restoration and stress recovery. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 36, 221–228. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvp.2013.08.004



 



13:20 Three theories explaining why natural sounds are restorative: attention restoration theory (ART), stress recovery theory (SRT), and conditioned restoration theory (CRT).



 



Kaplan, R., & Kaplan, S. (1989). The experience of nature: A psychological perspective. Cambridge university press.



 



Ulrich, R. S., Simons, R. F., Losito, B. D., Fiorito, E., Miles, M. A., & Zelson, M. (1991). Stress recovery during exposure to natural and urban environments. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 11(3), 201–230. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0272-4944(05)80184-7



 



Egner, L. E., Sütterlin, S., & Calogiuri, G. (2020). Proposing a framework for the restorative effects of nature through conditioning: Conditioned restoration theory. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17(18), 6792. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186792



 



21:20 PART II



 



22:35 Y. Suko’s research on the effects of faint traffic noise mixed with birdsong.



 



Suko, Y., Saito, K., Takayama, N., Warisawa, S., & Sakuma, T. (2019). Effect of faint road traffic noise mixed in birdsong on the perceived restorativeness and listeners’ physiological response: An exploratory study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 16(24), 4985. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16244985



 



33:20 Future applications of restorative natural sounds in clinical and non-clinical settings.



 



38:50 Restorative natural sounds are related to salutogenesis.



 



Antonovsky, A. (1996).

1 hr 17 min