38 min

Calories & Macros 101 Master Your Health Podcast

    • Fitness

There are three basic components to every diet: carbs, protein, and fat. These macro nutrients that make up our food can be tracked and consumed strategically in order to optimize performance and hit goals (although it’s not necessary for success). Additionally, short-term tracking of calories and macros can help lead to a to a more balanced diet and better body composition change. In this episode we dive into why tracking calories and macros can be helpful for some, how to calculate the correct amounts for you, when to adjust, and more. 
 
In this episode you'll learn: 
Why tracking macros can be helpful  About IIFYM (if it fits your macros) and how it works  That tracking macros can help you find where you're at  Why protein is such an important macro nutrient  How protein intake affects muscle  What carbohydrates are and how they’re stored   When is the optimal time of day to eat your carbs  About carb cycling  A few different option for macro ratios  What net carbs are (usually for keto)  About fats and why your body needs them  What some side effects are of not getting enough fat  About the ideal range of dietary fat for most people  How to calculate your macros  About online calculators  About TDEE (total daily energy expenditure)  General equations for calculation macros  A few accurate ways to measure body fat percentage About the Mifflin-St Jeor equation and the Katch-McArdle equation Why it's important to not over-exercise  That it can be helpful to take a weekly average for weight How to work out your macros starting with calorie intake  What lean body mass is and how to calculate it Some myths about eating a high protein diet How to find the right amount of carbs for you  Low carb vs keto  Why cookie cutter diet models aren't effective  About portion control and how tracking can help with it 


Studies: 
In one study, increasing protein intake from 15% to 30% of calories made overweight women eat 441 fewer calories each day without intentionally restricting anything. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16002798/ Studies show that protein is by far the most filling. It helps you feel more full — with less food https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15466943/ “Protein Recommendations for Weight Loss in Elite Athletes: A Focus on Body Composition and Performance” https://journals.humankinetics.com/view/journals/ijsnem/28/2/article-p170.xml “A Systematic Review of Dietary Protein During Caloric Restriction in Resistance Trained Lean Athletes: A Case for Higher Intakes”https://journals.humankinetics.com/view/journals/ijsnem/24/2/article-p127.xml A high protein diet can worsen kidney function for people that already have kidney disease, but it does not affect kidney function in healthy adults. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6236074/ A meta-analysis actually concluded that high-protein is actually favorable and not detrimental to bone health. https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/105/6/1528/4633993

There are three basic components to every diet: carbs, protein, and fat. These macro nutrients that make up our food can be tracked and consumed strategically in order to optimize performance and hit goals (although it’s not necessary for success). Additionally, short-term tracking of calories and macros can help lead to a to a more balanced diet and better body composition change. In this episode we dive into why tracking calories and macros can be helpful for some, how to calculate the correct amounts for you, when to adjust, and more. 
 
In this episode you'll learn: 
Why tracking macros can be helpful  About IIFYM (if it fits your macros) and how it works  That tracking macros can help you find where you're at  Why protein is such an important macro nutrient  How protein intake affects muscle  What carbohydrates are and how they’re stored   When is the optimal time of day to eat your carbs  About carb cycling  A few different option for macro ratios  What net carbs are (usually for keto)  About fats and why your body needs them  What some side effects are of not getting enough fat  About the ideal range of dietary fat for most people  How to calculate your macros  About online calculators  About TDEE (total daily energy expenditure)  General equations for calculation macros  A few accurate ways to measure body fat percentage About the Mifflin-St Jeor equation and the Katch-McArdle equation Why it's important to not over-exercise  That it can be helpful to take a weekly average for weight How to work out your macros starting with calorie intake  What lean body mass is and how to calculate it Some myths about eating a high protein diet How to find the right amount of carbs for you  Low carb vs keto  Why cookie cutter diet models aren't effective  About portion control and how tracking can help with it 


Studies: 
In one study, increasing protein intake from 15% to 30% of calories made overweight women eat 441 fewer calories each day without intentionally restricting anything. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16002798/ Studies show that protein is by far the most filling. It helps you feel more full — with less food https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15466943/ “Protein Recommendations for Weight Loss in Elite Athletes: A Focus on Body Composition and Performance” https://journals.humankinetics.com/view/journals/ijsnem/28/2/article-p170.xml “A Systematic Review of Dietary Protein During Caloric Restriction in Resistance Trained Lean Athletes: A Case for Higher Intakes”https://journals.humankinetics.com/view/journals/ijsnem/24/2/article-p127.xml A high protein diet can worsen kidney function for people that already have kidney disease, but it does not affect kidney function in healthy adults. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6236074/ A meta-analysis actually concluded that high-protein is actually favorable and not detrimental to bone health. https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/105/6/1528/4633993

38 min