37 min

36 - FASD Legislation Update: A Conversation with Susan Shepard Carlso‪n‬ FASD Hope

    • Parenting

FASD Hope is a podcast about Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD), through the lens of parent advocates with over 18 years of lived experience.
Episode 36 is titled "FASD Legislation Update" and features Susan Shepard Carlson. In addition to being Minnesota's First Lady from 1991-1997, Susan Shepard Carlson is an attorney and a retired Hennepin County Juvenile District Court judicial officer.  It was through her experience in juvenile court that led to Minnesota's efforts in combating the harmful effects of prenatal alcohol exposure. In 1997, Susan launched an initiative to promote Minnesota's effort on FASD education and prevention and co-chaired the Minnesota Governor's Taskforce on FAS resulting in almost $7 million annual funding for FASD prevention and intervention services.
Recognizing the need for the private sector to be involved in FASD in 1998, Susan formed the first affiliate of NOFAS (National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome) - Minnesota Organization on FAS (now Proof Alliance). For over 20 years, Susan has lead FASD policy, advocacy and training efforts on the national level as a member of the ICCFASD Justice Work Group, which led the effort in getting an ABA (American Bar Association) FASD resolution adopted in 2012. Other FASD achievements include: author of "tools for Success", an FASD training guide of juvenile justice professionals;  facilitated "Train the Trainers" conferences on a FASD curriculum for juvenile justice professionals at 4 sites throughout the country; 2006-2007 directed Hennepin County pilot program to screen and assess adjudicated juveniles for FASD; national speaker on FASD, justice issues and its impact on society. Susan currently is on the Board of Directors of NOFAS and chair of the Legislative and Policy Committee leading  the effort to pass the "Advancing FASD Research, Prevention and Services Act". Susan received her Bachelor of Arts Degree in Political Science from the University of Minnesota and a JD from Hamline University School of Law.
In this informative and HOPE filled episode, Susan discusses the following topics: her background and work in the FASD Community, the FASD Legislation that was ready to be presented last year (prior to COVID19), an update on the "Advancing FASD Research, Prevention and Services Act", how families can help the legislation gain momentum in moving forward and words of hope for families and those in the FASD community.
"...Remember to walk a mile in his moccasins and remember the lessons of humanity taught to you by your elders. We will be known forever by the tracks we leave in other people's lives, our kindnesses and generosity. Take the time to walk a mile in his moccasins."  - Mary T. Lathrap, "Judge Softly", 1895
 
Resources - 
NOFAS -
https://nofas.org/
FASD Advocacy Coalition Sign Up Form - 
https://nofas.wufoo.com/forms/fasd-advocacy-coalition-sign-up-form/
 
FASD Hope -
Instagram - @fasdhope
Facebook - @fasdhope1
Pinterest - @fasdhope1
Clubhouse - @natalievecc

FASD Hope is a podcast about Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD), through the lens of parent advocates with over 18 years of lived experience.
Episode 36 is titled "FASD Legislation Update" and features Susan Shepard Carlson. In addition to being Minnesota's First Lady from 1991-1997, Susan Shepard Carlson is an attorney and a retired Hennepin County Juvenile District Court judicial officer.  It was through her experience in juvenile court that led to Minnesota's efforts in combating the harmful effects of prenatal alcohol exposure. In 1997, Susan launched an initiative to promote Minnesota's effort on FASD education and prevention and co-chaired the Minnesota Governor's Taskforce on FAS resulting in almost $7 million annual funding for FASD prevention and intervention services.
Recognizing the need for the private sector to be involved in FASD in 1998, Susan formed the first affiliate of NOFAS (National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome) - Minnesota Organization on FAS (now Proof Alliance). For over 20 years, Susan has lead FASD policy, advocacy and training efforts on the national level as a member of the ICCFASD Justice Work Group, which led the effort in getting an ABA (American Bar Association) FASD resolution adopted in 2012. Other FASD achievements include: author of "tools for Success", an FASD training guide of juvenile justice professionals;  facilitated "Train the Trainers" conferences on a FASD curriculum for juvenile justice professionals at 4 sites throughout the country; 2006-2007 directed Hennepin County pilot program to screen and assess adjudicated juveniles for FASD; national speaker on FASD, justice issues and its impact on society. Susan currently is on the Board of Directors of NOFAS and chair of the Legislative and Policy Committee leading  the effort to pass the "Advancing FASD Research, Prevention and Services Act". Susan received her Bachelor of Arts Degree in Political Science from the University of Minnesota and a JD from Hamline University School of Law.
In this informative and HOPE filled episode, Susan discusses the following topics: her background and work in the FASD Community, the FASD Legislation that was ready to be presented last year (prior to COVID19), an update on the "Advancing FASD Research, Prevention and Services Act", how families can help the legislation gain momentum in moving forward and words of hope for families and those in the FASD community.
"...Remember to walk a mile in his moccasins and remember the lessons of humanity taught to you by your elders. We will be known forever by the tracks we leave in other people's lives, our kindnesses and generosity. Take the time to walk a mile in his moccasins."  - Mary T. Lathrap, "Judge Softly", 1895
 
Resources - 
NOFAS -
https://nofas.org/
FASD Advocacy Coalition Sign Up Form - 
https://nofas.wufoo.com/forms/fasd-advocacy-coalition-sign-up-form/
 
FASD Hope -
Instagram - @fasdhope
Facebook - @fasdhope1
Pinterest - @fasdhope1
Clubhouse - @natalievecc

37 min

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