1 hr 13 min

43: Katherine Harloe (University of Reading) Coffee and Circuses

    • History

Katherine joins David to discuss her work on the pioneering 18th century art historian and archaeologist Johann Joachim Winckelmann: his life, unfortunate early death, Katherine’s project on Winckelmann’s love letters and his status as a major figure in queer history, and giving his name to archaeology’s premier football tournament, the Winckelmann cup.
Katherine also discusses her own journey, growing up in the Roman town of Colchester, starting as a classics undergrad, but then moving onto modern history and then German philosophy for her PhD, and the benefits of being exposed to a range of ideas and approaches.
Following on from that, they also chat about some of the questions that need to be addressed regarding the relationship between classics and other subjects, as well as the reception of Rome in later cultures, and whether there is a disconnect between early career researchers and more established academics, especially when it comes to social media.
You can find Katherine on Twitter here (https://twitter.com/KatherineHarloe) and you can find her book Winckelmann and the Invention of Antiquity here (https://global.oup.com/academic/product/winckelmann-and-the-invention-of-antiquity-9780199695843?cc=gb&lang=en&) .

Katherine joins David to discuss her work on the pioneering 18th century art historian and archaeologist Johann Joachim Winckelmann: his life, unfortunate early death, Katherine’s project on Winckelmann’s love letters and his status as a major figure in queer history, and giving his name to archaeology’s premier football tournament, the Winckelmann cup.
Katherine also discusses her own journey, growing up in the Roman town of Colchester, starting as a classics undergrad, but then moving onto modern history and then German philosophy for her PhD, and the benefits of being exposed to a range of ideas and approaches.
Following on from that, they also chat about some of the questions that need to be addressed regarding the relationship between classics and other subjects, as well as the reception of Rome in later cultures, and whether there is a disconnect between early career researchers and more established academics, especially when it comes to social media.
You can find Katherine on Twitter here (https://twitter.com/KatherineHarloe) and you can find her book Winckelmann and the Invention of Antiquity here (https://global.oup.com/academic/product/winckelmann-and-the-invention-of-antiquity-9780199695843?cc=gb&lang=en&) .

1 hr 13 min

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