17 min

5 Keys to a quality taper Luke Humphrey Running

    • Health & Fitness

One of the biggest complaints I get from athletes following the book (link), is that there is no taper. They say that because they are used to going from six days per week down to 4 and their mileage decreasing from 50 miles a week down to 20 miles a week and they don’t do any workouts for two weeks. When they see a taper like that in the HMM books, they panic. Don’t panic! Let’s take a look at the variables involved and what’s going on in the body. While a taper can be highly individualized to the athlete’s current situation, there are some keys that can be universally applied. 







* Volume or Intensity







The common thing to do here is to cut both. By that, I mean what I discussed above. The daily volume is scaled back, the number of days is reduced, and the amount of intensity is scaled back (or removed altogether). Does this sound like you? Do you end up feeling sluggish rather than ready to rock? This could be a big reason why. The thing with the taper is that we are trying to balance recovery and performance increases against detraining from doing too little. While you may be able to do this for a short amount of time (a week maybe), many people attempt to do this for 2-4 weeks. With that amount of time, you cross over from elevating performance to detraining. While this isn’t extreme, just think of it this way- if you are willing to spend a big chunk of change on a shoe that will improve your performance by 1-3%, you certainly don’t want to give those gains away by going too hard on the taper! 







Now, don’t take that as don’t cut volume for workouts and easy days. The same is true for the intensity. Find the balance that works best for you. If you find you really do need to cut back to extremes, then I would assess the training that takes you up to that point- especially if you never seem to perform to what your training suggests. 







* Don’t change your routine







As Kevin and Keith Hanson always told us, the body craves consistency. Kevin would always make the analogy of sleep. If you are used to getting 6 hours of sleep and then all of a sudden you get 12, you tend to feel groggy the next day. We aren’t used to it. It can make us sluggish, make us feel heavy, and not ready to rock and roll. 







My advice is that if you run 5 days a week, continue to do so. If you do two workouts a week, continue to do so. Let’s keep the routine the same and just scale back the volume. 







* Analyze where you are at 







As you enter the final stretch, it’s key to take an honest assessment of where you are at from a fitness standpoint. Look over your training- how much were you able to get in? Does it line up with your goals? 







The big concern here is usually, “have I done enough?” As I write this, we are about six weeks out from the start of the fall marathon season and it has been HOT! So, what I hear now is big concerns over “weather” they can hit their goal pace since their workouts have either been a struggle to hit goal pace or were slow for a lot of the big workouts. I discuss this specific scenario in other writings, so I won’t address it here. 







The big questions I would ask myself







* Did I miss any significant amount of time in the last 8 weeks (1+ weeks of training) * Did I get the majority of the workouts in? (90%+ over last 8 weeks)* Was I able to hit my paces (or weather adjusted) and recover between workouts?







* Get to the line







At this point, if I am looking at my schedule and thinking there is no way I can run what’s on it, then do what’s best for you. Don’t confuse that with just reverting back to old ways that never seem to work out for you.

One of the biggest complaints I get from athletes following the book (link), is that there is no taper. They say that because they are used to going from six days per week down to 4 and their mileage decreasing from 50 miles a week down to 20 miles a week and they don’t do any workouts for two weeks. When they see a taper like that in the HMM books, they panic. Don’t panic! Let’s take a look at the variables involved and what’s going on in the body. While a taper can be highly individualized to the athlete’s current situation, there are some keys that can be universally applied. 







* Volume or Intensity







The common thing to do here is to cut both. By that, I mean what I discussed above. The daily volume is scaled back, the number of days is reduced, and the amount of intensity is scaled back (or removed altogether). Does this sound like you? Do you end up feeling sluggish rather than ready to rock? This could be a big reason why. The thing with the taper is that we are trying to balance recovery and performance increases against detraining from doing too little. While you may be able to do this for a short amount of time (a week maybe), many people attempt to do this for 2-4 weeks. With that amount of time, you cross over from elevating performance to detraining. While this isn’t extreme, just think of it this way- if you are willing to spend a big chunk of change on a shoe that will improve your performance by 1-3%, you certainly don’t want to give those gains away by going too hard on the taper! 







Now, don’t take that as don’t cut volume for workouts and easy days. The same is true for the intensity. Find the balance that works best for you. If you find you really do need to cut back to extremes, then I would assess the training that takes you up to that point- especially if you never seem to perform to what your training suggests. 







* Don’t change your routine







As Kevin and Keith Hanson always told us, the body craves consistency. Kevin would always make the analogy of sleep. If you are used to getting 6 hours of sleep and then all of a sudden you get 12, you tend to feel groggy the next day. We aren’t used to it. It can make us sluggish, make us feel heavy, and not ready to rock and roll. 







My advice is that if you run 5 days a week, continue to do so. If you do two workouts a week, continue to do so. Let’s keep the routine the same and just scale back the volume. 







* Analyze where you are at 







As you enter the final stretch, it’s key to take an honest assessment of where you are at from a fitness standpoint. Look over your training- how much were you able to get in? Does it line up with your goals? 







The big concern here is usually, “have I done enough?” As I write this, we are about six weeks out from the start of the fall marathon season and it has been HOT! So, what I hear now is big concerns over “weather” they can hit their goal pace since their workouts have either been a struggle to hit goal pace or were slow for a lot of the big workouts. I discuss this specific scenario in other writings, so I won’t address it here. 







The big questions I would ask myself







* Did I miss any significant amount of time in the last 8 weeks (1+ weeks of training) * Did I get the majority of the workouts in? (90%+ over last 8 weeks)* Was I able to hit my paces (or weather adjusted) and recover between workouts?







* Get to the line







At this point, if I am looking at my schedule and thinking there is no way I can run what’s on it, then do what’s best for you. Don’t confuse that with just reverting back to old ways that never seem to work out for you.

17 min

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