300 episodes

Leading science journalists provide a daily minute commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American . To view all of our archived podcasts please go to www.scientificamerican.com/podcast

60-Second Science Scientific American

    • Science

Leading science journalists provide a daily minute commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American . To view all of our archived podcasts please go to www.scientificamerican.com/podcast

    This Fish Knows How to Stick Around

    This Fish Knows How to Stick Around

    The remora clings to other fish—and appears to use an unusual sense of touch to do so. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

    • 2 min
    Antarctic Is Ripe for Invasive Species

    Antarctic Is Ripe for Invasive Species

    Mussels and crabs are two of the creatures most likely to invade Antarctica in the next 10 years, a panel of scientists say. Christopher Intagliata reports.

    • 2 min
    Bacteria Helped Plants Evolve to Live on Land

    Bacteria Helped Plants Evolve to Live on Land

    Soil bacteria may have taken residence in early algal species, gifting the algae with the ability to withstand drier conditions on land. Annie Sneed reports.

    • 2 min
    Meteorite Contains Material Older Than Earth

    Meteorite Contains Material Older Than Earth

    The Murchison meteorite, which screamed to Earth 50 years ago, carried with it stardust that's seven billion years old. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

    • 2 min
    Loss of Large Mammals Stamps Out Invertebrates, Too

    Loss of Large Mammals Stamps Out Invertebrates, Too

    Hunted areas of Gabon have fewer large mammals and a thicker forest understory—but they also have fewer termites. Jason G. Goldman reports.

    • 3 min
    Brittle Stars Can "See" without Eyes

    Brittle Stars Can "See" without Eyes

    The starfish relatives can recognize patterns using photoreceptors on their arms—and their color-changing abilities could have something to do with it. Christopher Intagliata reports.

    • 2 min

Customer Reviews

LaudablePun ,

Wait for the pun

Besides providing interesting information in short segments that can easily be a part of a daily routine they always seem to wrap it up in a laudable pun. Well done

xhastedmomof2 ,

Very informative with a side of humor

Scientific American has a stellar reputation so I expected this podcast would be amazing. I love the variety of topics and the way the information is delivered with a touch of humor.

Maggie_lyn21 ,

Interesting fun facts

I live for facts that are current in today’s world and this podcast are quick snippets of information that I sprinkle in conversations

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