51 episodes

Three BROADS (Lori Highby, Kris Harrington, and Erin Courtenay) bringing you stories and strategies exploring manufacturing topics that challenge the status quo while laying the foundations for future success.

Together with special guests they’ll celebrate what’s working and unpack what is not so YOU can learn, grow, and succeed.

The hosts are a BROADcast for Manufacturers are:
Kris Harrington | President and COO of GenAlpha Technologies | linkedin.com/in/kristinaharrington
Kris Harrington is the President and COO for GenAlpha Technologies. During her time with OEMs in the mining industry, Kris and the other founders of GenAlpha saw a need to find a better way for B2B manufacturers to do business. This led to the development of Equip360, an eCommerce, eCatalog and Analytics solution for manufacturers and distributors who want to grow their business online.

Erin Courtenay | VP of Digital Services at Earthling Interactive | linkedin.com/in/erincourtenay
Erin Courtenay is VP of Digital Services at Earthling Interactive. Erin loves watching programmers work their magic, opening up the possibilities of the internet to small and medium businesses with powerful websites and custom software. Calling herself a “digital empathy practitioner”, Erin is determined to help clients move thoughtfully and compassionately into their digital future.

Lori Highby | Founder & CEO @ Keystone Click | linkedin.com/in/lorihighby
Lori Highby is a podcast host, speaker, educator, and founder of Keystone Click, a strategic digital marketing agency. Using her vast multi-industry knowledge – gained from experience and education, She has the ability to see the potential of greatness within the already established good of a business. Through strategic actionable moves, she has worked with Fortune 500 companies to micro-business owners, to achieve their marketing goals.

a BROADcast for Manufacturers Keystone Click

    • Business
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

Three BROADS (Lori Highby, Kris Harrington, and Erin Courtenay) bringing you stories and strategies exploring manufacturing topics that challenge the status quo while laying the foundations for future success.

Together with special guests they’ll celebrate what’s working and unpack what is not so YOU can learn, grow, and succeed.

The hosts are a BROADcast for Manufacturers are:
Kris Harrington | President and COO of GenAlpha Technologies | linkedin.com/in/kristinaharrington
Kris Harrington is the President and COO for GenAlpha Technologies. During her time with OEMs in the mining industry, Kris and the other founders of GenAlpha saw a need to find a better way for B2B manufacturers to do business. This led to the development of Equip360, an eCommerce, eCatalog and Analytics solution for manufacturers and distributors who want to grow their business online.

Erin Courtenay | VP of Digital Services at Earthling Interactive | linkedin.com/in/erincourtenay
Erin Courtenay is VP of Digital Services at Earthling Interactive. Erin loves watching programmers work their magic, opening up the possibilities of the internet to small and medium businesses with powerful websites and custom software. Calling herself a “digital empathy practitioner”, Erin is determined to help clients move thoughtfully and compassionately into their digital future.

Lori Highby | Founder & CEO @ Keystone Click | linkedin.com/in/lorihighby
Lori Highby is a podcast host, speaker, educator, and founder of Keystone Click, a strategic digital marketing agency. Using her vast multi-industry knowledge – gained from experience and education, She has the ability to see the potential of greatness within the already established good of a business. Through strategic actionable moves, she has worked with Fortune 500 companies to micro-business owners, to achieve their marketing goals.

    51: Mastering ROI-Driven Marketing- with Chris Peer

    51: Mastering ROI-Driven Marketing- with Chris Peer

    Meet Chris PeerChris brings more than 20 years of experience in B2B digital marketing strategy, lead generation, and marketing consultancy for manufacturing firms. An author and entrepreneur, Chris is the founder and CEO of G8P and SyncShow.
    Having witnessed the pain and frustration caused by ineffective marketing, Chris and his team developed the Great 8 Pillars to transform the marketing department from a corporate expense into a profit center. He has helped hundreds of companies scale through world-class marketing best practices.
    Chris’ perspective on marketing operations transcends tactical methodologies and focuses on people, strategies, systems, and software to move the needle.
    Today, Chris’ focus remains on helping B2B manufacturing companies scale through his companies, consulting, and speaking.
    Highlights
    00:00 Kicking Off with Favorite Holidays Discussion
    01:48 Introducing Today's Guest: Chris Peer
    03:28 Unveiling the Great Eight Pillars of Marketing
    06:12 Deep Dive into Goals and Value Proposition
    07:57 Exploring the Certification Program for Marketers
    12:00 B2B vs B2C Marketing Insights
    14:32 Learning Segment: AI, Shipping Strategies, and Oysters
    19:19 Wrapping Up with Contact Information and Offers
    Connect with Chris!
    LinkedIn
    G8P
    SyncShow
    Great Eight Pillar Certification Course
    Use code SyncShow for 50% off
    The Great 8 Pillars: ROI-Driven Marketing for Manufacturing Companies

    Connect with the broads!
    Connect with Lori on LinkedIn and visit www.keystoneclick.com for your strategic digital marketing needs!  
    Connect with Kris on LinkedIn and visit www.genalpha.com for OEM and aftermarket digital solutions!
    Connect with Erin on LinkedIn!

    • 21 min
    Reflecting on 50 Episodes: Our Journey So Far

    Reflecting on 50 Episodes: Our Journey So Far

    In this special 50th episode, Erin, Lori and Kris reflect on their podcast journey, celebrating the diverse and enlightening conversations they've had with various guests from the manufacturing industry. They reminisce about starting the podcast, how it's evolved, and the personal growth and gratification they've experienced along the way. Highlighting their favorite episodes, they discuss poignant moments with guests like Nicole Donnelly and Nicki Vo, share valuable insights on manufacturing, digital transformation, women in STEM, and the importance of veterans in the workforce. The episode emphasizes the value of authenticity, diverse opinions, and the unique perspectives each host brings to the table. It concludes with a note of gratitude to their listeners and an invitation for feedback and guest suggestions, encouraging everyone to 'go make something awesome.'
    00:00 Celebrating 50 Episodes: A Journey of Connections and Conversations
    01:15 Reflecting on the Podcasting Journey: Insights and Surprises
    05:51 Highlighting Favorite Episodes: Diverse Conversations in Manufacturing
    11:37 Empowering Women in STEM and Beyond: Stories of Resilience and Innovation
    15:03 Exploring the Impact of Women in History and Manufacturing
    28:41 Veterans in Manufacturing: Bridging Skills and Opportunities
    32:35 Authentic Conversations and Diverse Perspectives: The Essence of Our Show
    Connect with the broads!
    Connect with Erin on LinkedIn for web-based solutions to your complex business problems!
    Connect with Lori on LinkedIn and visit www.keystoneclick.com for your strategic digital marketing needs!  
    Connect with Kris on LinkedIn and visit www.genalpha.com for OEM and aftermarket digital solutions!

    • 37 min
    49: The Art of Curiosity in Manufacturing- with Jeff Beyle

    49: The Art of Curiosity in Manufacturing- with Jeff Beyle

    Meet Jeff BeyleJeff started out writing software and then went to law school because he played softball with a bunch of lawyers and thought their work was interesting.
    Then he got lucky and joined Coca-Cola and had the opportunity to move to Hong Kong. He spent 7 years there, focusing mainly on China and Korea. Jeff moved to Seattle to join Getty Images. Eventually, he had the opportunity to set up Getty Images’ business in Latin America. After he and his then-biz-partner sold that company to Getty Images, his current business partner convinced him to co-found SC Tech.
    What are some of the advantages of not having a clearly aligned background in your current work? And what are some of the things that create obstacles or challenges? 
    Every time I go into a customer facility, I'm a little bit on my back foot. When you go to this nondescript building open the door and it's like opening a Christmas present because you never know what's going to be in there.  
    Technology, I don't understand all the details. It's much more of a user perspective because I just don't understand those details. And at this point, I'm not going to pretend like I'm going to get in there and figure it out. But you go into these buildings and you're like I don't know what I was expecting. But typically, this is not what I was expecting. And it's just so interesting. And I have a lot of known unknowns, but I have to go in with curiosity.
    I have to go in and ask the expansive questions and ask follow up questions because I don't understand. But that really helps me understand. Can we help this business solve some problems, some pain point that they have? And if so, how are we going to do that in a way that works for them? Because I understand their business from their perspective, as opposed to bringing a lot of preconceptions.

    What customers do you really enjoy working with the most?  
    It's like that’s passionate about their business and says, “Oh, it's thermal treatment of metal products.”
    You're not going to go to a party and people are going to say, “Oh, that is the coolest thing I've ever heard of in my life.” But there's so many ins and outs of each business. There's so many different products being manufactured, and there are different stages of how they build up these products from different suppliers. And each one is interesting in its own way. You're open to being interested in and curious about how this stuff works. And it's so much fun to talk to somebody who's passionate, whether it's a business that they just joined or they bought it or it's a family business or whatever. It's pretty exciting to go in and talk to people who really love what they're doing.
    And I maybe one of the benefits of the pandemic and supply chain mess is more focus on how much fun and how interesting supply chain and manufacturing can be. There's a lot of press about how much fun it is to work at Google and you can play ping pong and all that stuff. That's nice in a way, but really so many people would get a lot more satisfaction of [manufacturing]. I'm using my hands, I'm using my brain and I'm making something. And it's not a trivial process. There's a lot that goes into it, and I think we've ignored that for a while. And hopefully that's turning a corner.

    And so much more… 

    Connect with Jeff!
    LinkedIn
    SC Tech
    (720)432-5001

    Connect with the broads!
    Connect with Erin on LinkedIn for web-based solutions to your complex business...

    • 26 min
    48: Veteran Employment in Manufacturing- with Retired LtCol Kathy Lowrey Gallowitz

    48: Veteran Employment in Manufacturing- with Retired LtCol Kathy Lowrey Gallowitz

    Meet Retired LtCol Kathy Lowrey GallowitzRetired LtCol Kathy Lowrey Gallowitz is an award-winning businesswoman with first-hand experience hiring Veterans who coaches employers how to boost productivity and reduce turnover by hiring and retaining Veterans. She helps companies become “Veteran-Ready” through the creation of a Veteran Talent Strategy. Her “Veteran Talent Academy” equips employers to find, hire and leverage Veterans’ skillsets. She is the Founder & CEO of Vanguard Veteran, LLC, author of “Beyond ‘Thank You For your Service,’ The Veteran Champion Handbook” for Civilians and has Masters degrees in Nursing and Political Science. She grew up as a Navy ‘brat,’ served nearly 30 years as an Air Force Officer and is married to an Army combat Veteran. Kathy also equips volunteer faith community leaders to build Military Ministries to cultivate mutual support, a sense of belonging and spiritual resiliency for military-connected people
    Why are veterans particularly well suited to work in manufacturing? Well, Kris, you're probably can answer this just as well since you've spent your entire career there. Still, I think top of the list is quality assurance, quality control, safety mindset, and operational discipline. Those are the attributes that align most beautifully within the manufacturing setting But then beyond that is our love for small unit integrity. And with that integrity comes teamwork, leadership, and camaraderie. In the military, we're broken up into small groups and into bigger groups. And it facilitates problem solving, critical thinking, chain of command. And all that stuff mirrors the manufacturing industry, because everybody's got to know their job. You got to do your job right the first time to create that product to meet mission. 
    Then there are other attributes I've heard employers describe military people's anchors. They're anchors because we're used to managing stressful conditions, high ops tempo, and potential conflict. And so we're pretty good problem solvers, critical thinkers, and calm under pressure, so that anchoring has it's ripples throughout the organization and really makes a difference. The other key attributes that I should have introduced way up front are technical skills and aptitudes. 
    Now we may not have the exact training on the exact piece of equipment, but one thing we do do is train, train, train, and train some more. And more often than not, it's technical. Now that wasn't my career. I was in nursing and public affairs and I'm not very technical, but most military people who are interested in manufacturing probably have some sort of technical aptitude that they can bring.
    And so hiring for character and hiring for aptitude and training is in a manufacturer's best interest because you will get a return on investment by hiring that veteran that may have a different resume than you want. Take a chance, train them. You won't be disappointed.
    Where do manufacturing employers find veterans?
    That's one of the biggest complaints employers typically have because they feel confused and lost about how to connect with veteran talent. That's one of the things I do best. First of all, American job centers are all over the country and they give priority to military candidates. So that's a good place to go look.
    And, as I understand it, most of those job seekers are unemployed. There are also local and national nonprofits that connect employers to veterans and or vice versa, and or prepare veteran job seekers. One of those is Hiring Our Heroes. One of those is 50 Strong. 
    But you can go look in your local community and look at how you can find veteran talent. They are around certainly there is varying quality, but you could go talk to your Department of Veteran Services (VA). They should have some general understanding of where to find those kinds of services. Of course, if you have a

    • 30 min
    47: Navigating Leadership Challenges in Manufacturing- with Holly Whitcomb

    47: Navigating Leadership Challenges in Manufacturing- with Holly Whitcomb

    Meet Holly WhitcombHolly Whitcomb’s passion for helping people be their best drives her every day. Holly is the CEO and Founder of Novel Leadership, focused on the development of individuals and teams through coaching, workshop facilitation and consulting. Holly is well versed in working with front-line level leaders in manufacturing organizations as well as senior leaders in highly matrixed organizations.
    Prior to founding Novel Leadership, Holly led 3M Company’s North America Learning & Development team where she worked directly with senior leaders to increase their leadership team effectiveness and leadership development needs across 3M’s back-office, client facing and manufacturing teams.

    Why is leadership and all development important in manufacturing? 
    Think about all of the changes that have happened over the course of the last 10 years, but even think about what we've been through in the last four years. And the impact that that has had on manufacturing environments, on teams. On all the challenges that have not been planned, even though we always say we plan for stuff, right? I think that that's where it really starts to come in and you start to understand the importance of this idea of building capacity, building skills, building agility across all levels of the organization, across all silos.
    And the one thing that I've noticed over the course of the work that I've done is this silo has a tendency to be left back here sometimes when it comes to these corporate initiatives of development. And so that's why I think it's so critical because when we think about what kept things moving, it was the people who went in. It was the people who were on the floor. 
    And so it's how do we help recognize the value in a different way? So that's kind of why it's important to me and one of my passion projects.

    What are some of the most critical skills you find are lacking or really needed today? 
    I don't know if this is just manufacturing. I think we're all recognizing that we are entering into what I call kind of this new phase of what it looks like to be an employee and be an employer in the world that we're in today. And mental health is a huge piece of that. Whole person is a huge piece of that. Inclusion is a huge piece of that.
    And so I think a couple of the things that I think about in terms of skills when I talk with leaders is where you are with your understanding about your own emotional intelligence. How is your coaching capability? How are you delivering feedback? And how are you engaging with people on that whole person aspect of who they are. So the whole idea of psychological safety, how are you creating an environment where people feel safe to be who they are and bring their voices into the organization? And when I think about it, oftentimes people are like, “Oh, manufacturing. No, they're just, they're good. They don't need it.” And they may work on machines, but these are humans. And think about what it is that we need to do as leaders in order to be able to crack open what our whole team knows and creating that environment where people feel safe.

    And so much more… 

    Reference
    Advertising spend will bounce back in 2024: S&P Global Ratings

    Connect with Holly!
    LinkedIn
    Novel Leadership
    Facebook
    a...

    • 30 min
    46: Focusing on Common Goals in Organizations- with Jim Bohn

    46: Focusing on Common Goals in Organizations- with Jim Bohn

    Meet Jim BohnJim Bohn PhD, is a researcher-practitioner focused on improving organizations one person at a time. He is a change management expert with decades of experience across multiple business markets and has spoken throughout the United States on topics of leadership, organizational performance and people development. He is currently coaching doctoral students at Concordia University. Dr. Bohn's focus is helping businesses throughout SE Wisconsin to overcome challenges and improve productivity. His primary research interest is Organizational Engagement, a complimentary approach to Employee Engagement. Dr. Bohn has multiple publications on Amazon.
    How does your background uniquely make you suitable in the manufacturing space? 
    Well, let's start with my background. I have run a punch press. I was a spot welder. I worked as a project manager across the United States with injection molding machines. I have machine oil in my veins. My father was a machinist. My son is a tool and dining maker journeyman.
    I am sort of the black sheep of the family. I got the Ph. D. They did real work. But I have spent my time on the shop floor. I know what it's like to be out there. I've got a few scars with stitches to prove it. And I'm very proud of my blue-collar roots.

    How do you get past the differences to get stuff done?
    Well, it's a fundamental thing. You design the end. This is what we want to accomplish. [I’m] a baby boomer, as you can tell, I'm 71 years old. I offer some things. I've got a bucket of experience. I've seen lots of failure. But I don't have the skill set of some millennial who can launch the space shuttle from my phone.
    And I think with all the generational differences, it's like “Okay, Boomer” or “Millennials are stupid.” If we do that, we're just shoving them into the corner as opposed to saying what can you bring to this? 
    If you're a financial wizard and you're 18 years old, I don't care. I don't care where you came from. Bring your knowledge, bring your skill. A good leader will do that. And that's where I think that whole generational thing has been so divisive. It's helpful to understand. 
    But again, I don't like it when somebody says, “Okay, Boomer,” because I look like an old man. Yeah, I'm old, but I can bring some things to you. I've seen the same stupid organizational mistakes over and over again. I can help you with that, but I'm not technically savvy. I want to know what you know, and I will learn from you if you slow down a little bit.

    And so much more… 

    Reference
    Teens, Social Media and Technology 2023

    Connect with Jim!
    LinkedIn
    doctorbohnphd@gmail.com 
    People Development: The best part of leading a team

    Connect with the broads!
    Connect with Erin on LinkedIn for web-based solutions to your complex business problems!
    Connect with Lori on LinkedIn and visit www.keystoneclick.com for your strategic digital marketing needs!  
    Connect with Kris on a...

    • 28 min

Customer Reviews

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2 Ratings

SnehaK2904 ,

Love these power ladies!

I have known these women leaders for their leadership and knowledge across the board from e-commerce to manufacturing. This podcast is going to be great.

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