19 min

A Christians Approach to Halloween Resounding Shophar Blast Podcast

    • Christianity

Several weeks ago I walked into the local Wal-Mart and was immediately reminded about the time of year we were entering into.  You know that time of year, when fear, hate, terror, and the occult are glamorized and embraced with passion and excitement, reaching its peak on a day we call Halloween.  I’ve written since 2011 what my position is regarding this day that comes every year, and that hasn’t changed, but I want to take a different approach to the subject this year.

 

Each year the question is asked as to whether Christians should have anything to do with Halloween, or not.  And each year it only divides those who are opposed to it and those who think it’s okay for one reason or another.  You would think that the answer to the question is a simple one, and it really is, but when we determine our answer according to our personal opinions and feelings, instead of what Scripture has to say about it, then the answer becomes nothing less than complicated and divisive within church circles.

 

When we see that day approaching, it’s not uncommon to see and hear of churches gearing up and planning what they will do on Halloween.  Usually, the rationale they will embrace will go along one of two lines of thought; 1) they want to offer a Halloween alternative, or 2) they want to provide a safe place for children and adults.  But is Halloween something that Christians and churches should be involved with?  Unlike Christmas and Easter, holidays that some argue have both Christian and pagan roots, there is absolutely nothing Christian or God honoring when it comes to Halloween.  In fact, everything Halloween represents is anti-God and contrary to the mind and character of Jesus.  So, why is it that churches seem to believe that it’s okay to participate in one way or another on this holiday?

 

I’ve heard it argued by one pastor that even though their church has a community event on Halloween, an event where those who are organizing and putting it on incorporate costumes, various Halloween decorations, as well as activities that are clearly Halloween in nature, not to mention a name which is clearly a Halloween like name, that they are not participating in the Halloween festivities.  Well, I don’t know what his definition of participation is, but common sense for most people know that they are in fact participating in and celebrating Halloween.

 

There was a time several years ago that the United States was trying to befriend the nation of Iran, a country that is bent on nothing less than the total destruction of America and Israel.  It seemed like we were rolling out the red carpet of friendship with them, ignoring the fact that they did not share in that same endeavor.  As I observed what was happening, I couldn’t help but think of Halloween and how some churches and Christians seem to be okay with it.  Everything about Halloween and what it represents is anti-God, anti-Christ, anti-Bible, and anti-life, just to name a few.  There is absolutely nothing redeeming about it, yet we have churches and Christians trying to find creative ways to “Christianize” the celebration to justify their involvement with it.  Contrary to how many seem to view Halloween, we are told in Ephesians 5:11 not to have any part in the unfruitful works of darkness, but rather to expose them.  We are also told in 1 Thessalonians 5:22 to abstain from every form of evil, and in Deuteronomy 18:9-14 and Leviticus 19:30-31 we are told of some of those things God says are evil.

 

Some will argue that it’s okay to do so because Jesus was a friend of sinners, a term that was given more as an insult to Him than a compliment.  Just because He associated with those considered to be sinners does not mean that He was a participant in sin, in that which was opposed to God in any way, or that He encouraged or condoned such a

Several weeks ago I walked into the local Wal-Mart and was immediately reminded about the time of year we were entering into.  You know that time of year, when fear, hate, terror, and the occult are glamorized and embraced with passion and excitement, reaching its peak on a day we call Halloween.  I’ve written since 2011 what my position is regarding this day that comes every year, and that hasn’t changed, but I want to take a different approach to the subject this year.

 

Each year the question is asked as to whether Christians should have anything to do with Halloween, or not.  And each year it only divides those who are opposed to it and those who think it’s okay for one reason or another.  You would think that the answer to the question is a simple one, and it really is, but when we determine our answer according to our personal opinions and feelings, instead of what Scripture has to say about it, then the answer becomes nothing less than complicated and divisive within church circles.

 

When we see that day approaching, it’s not uncommon to see and hear of churches gearing up and planning what they will do on Halloween.  Usually, the rationale they will embrace will go along one of two lines of thought; 1) they want to offer a Halloween alternative, or 2) they want to provide a safe place for children and adults.  But is Halloween something that Christians and churches should be involved with?  Unlike Christmas and Easter, holidays that some argue have both Christian and pagan roots, there is absolutely nothing Christian or God honoring when it comes to Halloween.  In fact, everything Halloween represents is anti-God and contrary to the mind and character of Jesus.  So, why is it that churches seem to believe that it’s okay to participate in one way or another on this holiday?

 

I’ve heard it argued by one pastor that even though their church has a community event on Halloween, an event where those who are organizing and putting it on incorporate costumes, various Halloween decorations, as well as activities that are clearly Halloween in nature, not to mention a name which is clearly a Halloween like name, that they are not participating in the Halloween festivities.  Well, I don’t know what his definition of participation is, but common sense for most people know that they are in fact participating in and celebrating Halloween.

 

There was a time several years ago that the United States was trying to befriend the nation of Iran, a country that is bent on nothing less than the total destruction of America and Israel.  It seemed like we were rolling out the red carpet of friendship with them, ignoring the fact that they did not share in that same endeavor.  As I observed what was happening, I couldn’t help but think of Halloween and how some churches and Christians seem to be okay with it.  Everything about Halloween and what it represents is anti-God, anti-Christ, anti-Bible, and anti-life, just to name a few.  There is absolutely nothing redeeming about it, yet we have churches and Christians trying to find creative ways to “Christianize” the celebration to justify their involvement with it.  Contrary to how many seem to view Halloween, we are told in Ephesians 5:11 not to have any part in the unfruitful works of darkness, but rather to expose them.  We are also told in 1 Thessalonians 5:22 to abstain from every form of evil, and in Deuteronomy 18:9-14 and Leviticus 19:30-31 we are told of some of those things God says are evil.

 

Some will argue that it’s okay to do so because Jesus was a friend of sinners, a term that was given more as an insult to Him than a compliment.  Just because He associated with those considered to be sinners does not mean that He was a participant in sin, in that which was opposed to God in any way, or that He encouraged or condoned such a

19 min

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