34 episodes

A New York Minute In History is a podcast about the history of New York and the unique tales of New Yorkers. It is hosted by State Historian Devin Lander, Saratoga County Historian Lauren Roberts and Don Wildman. Jesse King and Jim Levulis of WAMC produce the podcast.

A New York Minute In History is a production of the New York State Museum, WAMC Northeast Public Radio and Archivist Media.

Support for the project comes from The William G. Pomeroy Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities and a Humanities New York Action Grant.


Find us on social media! Twitter: @NYHistoryMinute

A New York Minute In History WAMC

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.6 • 37 Ratings

A New York Minute In History is a podcast about the history of New York and the unique tales of New Yorkers. It is hosted by State Historian Devin Lander, Saratoga County Historian Lauren Roberts and Don Wildman. Jesse King and Jim Levulis of WAMC produce the podcast.

A New York Minute In History is a production of the New York State Museum, WAMC Northeast Public Radio and Archivist Media.

Support for the project comes from The William G. Pomeroy Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities and a Humanities New York Action Grant.


Find us on social media! Twitter: @NYHistoryMinute

    Georgia O'Keeffe and Her Visit to Wiawaka | A New York Minute in History

    Georgia O'Keeffe and Her Visit to Wiawaka | A New York Minute in History

    On this episode, Devin and Lauren discuss how the poor conditions of female textile workers in Capital Region cities led to the creation of a retreat where women could “escape” the cities. Wiawaka was founded by Mary Fuller, an advocate for women workers in Troy, and the wealthy philanthropists Katrina and Spenser Trask. Wiawaka originally included a planned artist’s retreat, called Wakonda, where Georgia O’Keeffe was invited to stay as a young artist and member of the Arts Students League. This introduction to Lake George had a monumental effect on O’Keeffe’s life and art, and she spent several years working in the area.









    Marker of Focus: Georgia O'Keeffe, Lake George, Warren County









    Guests: Doreen Kelly, executive director of Wiawaka, and Karen Quinn, art historian and curator at the New York State Museum







    A New York Minute In History is a production of the New York State Museum, WAMC, and Archivist Media, with support from the William G. Pomeroy Foundation. This episode was produced by Jesse King. Our theme is "Begrudge" by Darby.















    Further Reading:



    Messinger, Lisa Mintz. Georgia O'Keeffe. London: Thames & Hudson, 2001.



    O'Keeffe, Georgia. Georgia O'Keeffe. New York: Viking, 1976.



    Wiawaka Holiday House: https://upstatehistorical.org/items/show/84?tour=7&index=10



    Capital Region Textile Industry: https://www.albanyinstitute.org/textile-industry.html



    The Collar City by Don Rittner: https://rensselaer.nygenweb.net/article11.htm



    Collar Maid Cuffed Bosses by Pam Trudeau: https://rensselaer.nygenweb.net/article4.htm



    More on Georgia O’Keeffe: https://www.okeeffemuseum.org/about-georgia-okeeffe/













    Follow Along







    Devin: Welcome to A New York Minute in History. I'm Devin Lander, the New York state historian.







    Lauren: And I'm Lauren Roberts, the historian for Saratoga County. On this episode, we're taking a deeper look at a marker located along Route 9L on the eastern shores of Lake George, which is located in Warren County. The title of the marker is “Georgia O'Keeffe,” and the text reads: “Georgia O'Keeffe, 1887 to 1986. American artist who stayed at Wakonda in June 1908 on a scholarship from the Art Students League. William G. Pomeroy Foundation, 2016.”



    The artist Georgia O'Keeffe is pretty much a household name, but I'm guessing many of our listeners haven't heard of Wakonda, which is the lodge Georgia O'Keeffe stayed in, or the Art Students League. So let's take a step back and talk about what brought this young artist to the shores of Lake George in the summer of 1908.



    In the 19th century, the city of Troy in Rensselaer County was known as the "Collar City," because Troy produced the majority of detachable shirt collars in the country. Detachable collars are now a thing of the past, but in the 19th Century, they were really popular. The collar was usually the dirtiest part of the shirt, and it needed to be laundered most frequently, and in the days before washing machines, this was really a pain. So someone in Troy — there's a couple of conflicting stories about who a

    • 29 min
    Early Auto Racing in New York | A New York Minute in History

    Early Auto Racing in New York | A New York Minute in History

    On this episode, Devin and Lauren discuss a William G. Pomeroy marker recognizing a 1900 auto race in Suffolk County, New York, and the importance of racing in automobile history. Was that race to Babylon really the first of its kind in the U.S.? And how did Watkins Glen International get its start?

    • 29 min
    Margaret Hastings, the “Shangri-La WAC” | A New York Minute in History

    Margaret Hastings, the “Shangri-La WAC” | A New York Minute in History

    In honor of Women's History Month, Devin and Lauren highlight a Pomeroy marker in Tioga County and tell the story of Corporal Margaret Hastings, a member of the Women's Army Corps who survived 47 days in a New Guinea jungle during World War II.













    Marker of Focus: World War II, Owego, Tioga County









    Guests: Mitchell Zuckoff, author of Lost in Shangri-La; Emma Sedore, Tioga County historian



    A New York Minute In History is a production of the New York State Museum, WAMC, and Archivist Media, with support from the William G. Pomeroy Foundation. This episode was produced by Jesse King. Our theme is "Begrudge" by Darby.























    Further Reading:



    Lost in Shangri-La by Mitchell Zuckoff



    Women For Victory Vol 2: The Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC) (American Servicewomen in World War II: History & Uniform Series, 2) by Katy Endruschat Goebel



    The Ghost Mountain Boys: Their Epic March and the Terrifying Battle for New Guinea--The Forgotten War of the South Pacific by James Campbell







    Teaching Resources:





    Women in the Army: The Creation of the Women’s Auxiliary Corps



    U.S. Army Center of Military History: “The Women’s Army Corps: A Commemoration of World War II Service” By Judith A. Bellafaire



    PBS Learning Media: Corporal Margaret Hastings

















    Follow Along

















    Devin: Welcome to A New York Minute in History. I'm Devin Lander, the New York state historian.



    Lauren: And I'm Lauren Roberts, the historian for Saratoga County. In honor of Women's History Month, we have a fascinating account for you that includes tragedy, survival, ingenuity and an amazing plan of rescue. We begin the story in the village of Owego, which is located in Tioga County, in the Southern Tier region of New York. The William G. Pomeroy historic marker is located in front of 106 McMaster Street, and the text reads: “World War II. Home of Shangri-La WAC, Corporal Margaret J. Hastings, who survived 47 days in New Guinea jungle after May 13, 1945 plane crash. William G. Pomeroy Foundation, 2016.”



    So there's quite a lot to unpack from those few lines of text. But let's start at the beginning. The sign is marking the former home of Corporal Margaret Hastings, so who was she? We spoke with Tioga County Historian Emma Sedore, who told us a little bit more about what Margaret's life was like growing up in Owego.



    Emma: One day at the museum,

    • 29 min
    Rapp Road and the Great Migration | A New York Minute in History

    Rapp Road and the Great Migration | A New York Minute in History

    On this episode, hosts Devin and Lauren delve into the history of Albany County's Rapp Road Community, an African American neighborhood built by southern immigrants who moved north for a better life in the late 1920s.









    Marker of Focus: Rapp Road Community Historic District, Albany County









    Guests: Stephanie Woodard, board member of the Rapp Road Historical Association; Dr. Jennifer Lemak, chief curator of the history collection at the New York State Museum, and author of Southern Life, Northern City: The History of Albany’s Rapp Road Community



    A New York Minute In History is a production of the New York State Museum, WAMC, and Archivist Media, with support from the William G. Pomeroy Foundation. This episode was produced by Jesse King. Our theme is "Begrudge" by Darby.







    Further reading:



    Southern Life, Northern City: The History of Albany’s Rapp Road Community Jennifer A. Lemak (2008)



    Black Protest and the Great Migration: A Brief History with DocumentsEric Arnesen (2002)



    The Southern Diaspora: How the Great Migrations of Black and White Southerners Transformed AmericaJames N. Gregory (2005)







    Teacher Resources:





    PBS Teaching Guide: Exploring the Great Migration



    National Archives- Harry S. Truman Library and Museum: The Great Migration Lesson Plan



    Stanford University, Stanford History Education Group: Great Migration



    National Geographic: The Great Migration- Educator Guide













    Follow Along







    Devin: Welcome to A New York Minute in History. I'm Devin Lander, the New York state historian.







    Lauren: And I'm Lauren Roberts, the historian for Saratoga County. This episode is focusing on a marker which recognizes the history of a small African American community located within the city of Albany that came into existence as a direct result of the Great Migration. Now, this sign isn't a traditional blue-and-yellow historical marker. It is brown, and has white text on it, and it recognizes the inclusion of this community on the National Register of Historic Places. Located at 28 Rapp Road in the city of Albany, the text reads: “Rapp Road Community Historic District has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2002 by the United States Department of the Interior. William G. Pomeroy Foundation, 2017.”



    The marker we'r

    • 29 min
    Thomas Paine's Lost Body | A New York Minute in History

    Thomas Paine's Lost Body | A New York Minute in History

     
    In the first episode of our new season, Devin and Lauren look to a William G. Pomeroy marker in Westchester County to learn about American patriot Thomas Paine, his influence on the American and French Revolutions — and just how and why his body went missing. Where is Thomas Paine today?
     
    Marker: Thomas Paine, New Rochelle, Westchester County, NY
     



    Guests: Dr. Nora Slonimsky and Dr. Michael Crowder of the Institute for Thomas Paine Studies at Iona College
    A New York Minute In History is a production of the New York State Museum, WAMC, and Archivist Media, with support from the William G. Pomeroy Foundation. This episode was produced by Jesse King. Our theme is “Begrudge” by Darby.
     
    Further Reading:
    Tom Paine and Revolutionary America, Eric Foner (1976)
    The Thomas Paine Reader, Thomas Paine, with an introduction by Michael Foot and Isaac Kramnick (1987)
    Thomas Paine: Enlightenment, Revolution, and the Birth of Modern Nations, Craig Nelson (2007)
     
    Teacher Resources:
    New York State Museum Educational ResourceDownload
    PBS Teaching Guide: Thomas Paine: Writer and Revolutionary
    C-SPAN Classroom: Lesson Plan: Thomas Paine and Common Sense
    National Humanities Center: America in Class: Thomas Paine’s Common Sense,

    • 29 min
    Historical Markers | A New York Minute In History

    Historical Markers | A New York Minute In History

    On this episode, Devin and Lauren tackle all of New York’s historical markers at once — sort of. Devin and Lauren discuss how the state’s historical marker program got started, what happened to it, and how communities can apply for a marker today. As an added bonus, Devin and Lauren speak with Susan Hughes of the William G. Pomeroy Foundation about the foundation’s new “Hungry for History” grant program — and they also speak with Bill Pomeroy himself, about his interest in history and some of his favorite markers.



    (more…)

    • 29 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
37 Ratings

37 Ratings

ETC 2958 ,

Listener

Very interesting
Well constructed presentation and easy to listen to.

Jeff from NY ,

Great Show

I’m really glad to see and listen to a podcast that not only shows New York City history, but also New York State! Very well put together show and hope that you keep them coming and cover every corner of the great state of New York!

NYC goil ,

Excellent!

These podcasts are like a very well produced audio documentary. Excellent content and delivery. Very enjoyable and informative. Please keep them coming!

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