1 hr 6 min

267 Diversity and Inclusion in the Workplace with Cheya Dixon A Tale of Two Hygienists Podcast

    • Natural Sciences

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THIS EPISODE COUNTS FOR CE! - but read the disclaimers it might not count for your state.
Go here to take the test and get your free CE Credit!

On this week’s A Tale of Two hygienists, we’re focusing on how companies and clinics can work to foster a more diverse and inclusive workplace. Our guest for this episode is actually in charge of that role at her own workplace.
 
For this interview, Andrew was able to speak to Cheya Dixon, the Director of Diversity for the professional oral health care association at Procter & Gamble, where she’s happily and enthusiastically worked for the last 21 years. Andrew is additionally joined by Brittany Duncan, the A Tale of Two Hygienists’ director of sales and marketing and the person who keeps everything on this audible ship running smoothly.
 
In this episode, Cheya discusses what it’s like to work in a consistently inclusive environment, explains how a little bit of singing got her started on the path to becoming the Director of Diversity, and reveals how some oral care brands are reaching out to their communities in the midst of quarantine.
 
 
EPISODE HIGHLIGHTS:
 
Interview starts: 14:20

 
- The most essential reason for why Cheya has worked with the same company for over two decades.
 
- How P&G’s take on American Idol provided Cheya with a new source of pride and an opportunity to improve the country.
 
- Why selling is a valuable skill for any oral health professional.
 
- Cheya’s advice for those about to transfer or considering transferring to sales.
 
- How P&G helped make the 40 most difficult days of Cheya’s life more bearable.
 
- Cheya explains how the Bridges Virtual Summits are an effective new way for Crest and Oral B to serve their community.
 
- The big and little things you and your workplace can do to create a more inclusive and welcoming environment.



 
QUOTES:
 
“If you ever talk to me and I ever have to sell you something, it should feel less like a sale and more like a conversation.”
 
“Do not sell anything you are not passionate about.”
 
“If you can't tell by the end of this podcast, I have the gift of gab.”
 
“I'd come to work everyday with 150% of myself there.”
 
“We're working to create patient education materials... that are reflective of the communities we serve.”
 
“Put on somebody else’s shoes and learn a little bit about their journey!”
 
“I think it's incredibly important that we learn from our history so that we don't repeat it.”
 



LINKS:


Donate to Andrew's Walking Campaign: https://www.ataleoftwohygienists.com/andrew-walks-for-charity/andrew-walks-for-charity/ 
 
Cheya’s email - dixon.cr@pg.com 
Dental Care homepage - https://www.dentalcare.com/en-us 
 
ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:
Pew Research Andrew Mentioned: https://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/articles/2016/05/12/dental-health-is-worse-in-communities-of-color?fbclid=IwAR0OweskTik11IXxRQtO_nUIKH9G7ba-W6WjfISatbxXj8LOrknA-f0BRjg
According to the National Center for Biotechnology Information, African-American children had higher levels of dental caries and in 2009–2010, the prevalence of untreated caries for African American children aged 3–5 was significantly higher than Caucasian children (19% vs. 11%, respectively) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6427601/#:~:text=According%20to%20a%20report%20produced,as%20African%20American%20%5B48%5D

Homophily, the tendency to bond with those who are similar, may be a potential facilitator for overcoming patient–provider mistrust and oral health disparities. According to a report produced by the American Dental Association, African Americans comprise 12.4% of the population while only 3.8% of dentists self-identified as African American [48]. This, too, may be the result of the historical structural barriers which prevented dentists of color from studying, gain

Please Leave a Review! 
 
THIS EPISODE COUNTS FOR CE! - but read the disclaimers it might not count for your state.
Go here to take the test and get your free CE Credit!

On this week’s A Tale of Two hygienists, we’re focusing on how companies and clinics can work to foster a more diverse and inclusive workplace. Our guest for this episode is actually in charge of that role at her own workplace.
 
For this interview, Andrew was able to speak to Cheya Dixon, the Director of Diversity for the professional oral health care association at Procter & Gamble, where she’s happily and enthusiastically worked for the last 21 years. Andrew is additionally joined by Brittany Duncan, the A Tale of Two Hygienists’ director of sales and marketing and the person who keeps everything on this audible ship running smoothly.
 
In this episode, Cheya discusses what it’s like to work in a consistently inclusive environment, explains how a little bit of singing got her started on the path to becoming the Director of Diversity, and reveals how some oral care brands are reaching out to their communities in the midst of quarantine.
 
 
EPISODE HIGHLIGHTS:
 
Interview starts: 14:20

 
- The most essential reason for why Cheya has worked with the same company for over two decades.
 
- How P&G’s take on American Idol provided Cheya with a new source of pride and an opportunity to improve the country.
 
- Why selling is a valuable skill for any oral health professional.
 
- Cheya’s advice for those about to transfer or considering transferring to sales.
 
- How P&G helped make the 40 most difficult days of Cheya’s life more bearable.
 
- Cheya explains how the Bridges Virtual Summits are an effective new way for Crest and Oral B to serve their community.
 
- The big and little things you and your workplace can do to create a more inclusive and welcoming environment.



 
QUOTES:
 
“If you ever talk to me and I ever have to sell you something, it should feel less like a sale and more like a conversation.”
 
“Do not sell anything you are not passionate about.”
 
“If you can't tell by the end of this podcast, I have the gift of gab.”
 
“I'd come to work everyday with 150% of myself there.”
 
“We're working to create patient education materials... that are reflective of the communities we serve.”
 
“Put on somebody else’s shoes and learn a little bit about their journey!”
 
“I think it's incredibly important that we learn from our history so that we don't repeat it.”
 



LINKS:


Donate to Andrew's Walking Campaign: https://www.ataleoftwohygienists.com/andrew-walks-for-charity/andrew-walks-for-charity/ 
 
Cheya’s email - dixon.cr@pg.com 
Dental Care homepage - https://www.dentalcare.com/en-us 
 
ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:
Pew Research Andrew Mentioned: https://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/articles/2016/05/12/dental-health-is-worse-in-communities-of-color?fbclid=IwAR0OweskTik11IXxRQtO_nUIKH9G7ba-W6WjfISatbxXj8LOrknA-f0BRjg
According to the National Center for Biotechnology Information, African-American children had higher levels of dental caries and in 2009–2010, the prevalence of untreated caries for African American children aged 3–5 was significantly higher than Caucasian children (19% vs. 11%, respectively) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6427601/#:~:text=According%20to%20a%20report%20produced,as%20African%20American%20%5B48%5D

Homophily, the tendency to bond with those who are similar, may be a potential facilitator for overcoming patient–provider mistrust and oral health disparities. According to a report produced by the American Dental Association, African Americans comprise 12.4% of the population while only 3.8% of dentists self-identified as African American [48]. This, too, may be the result of the historical structural barriers which prevented dentists of color from studying, gain

1 hr 6 min