12 episodes

AACR 2013 Annual Meeting ecancer

    • Medicine

    • video
    Prevention of squamous cell carcinoma: Dr Kenneth Tsai - MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA

    Prevention of squamous cell carcinoma: Dr Kenneth Tsai - MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA

    Dr Kenneth Tsai talks to ecancer at the 2013 AACR Annual Meeting in Washington DC about his research on squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) for which he was awarded the Sixth Annual Landon Foundation-AACR INNOVATOR Award for Cancer Prevention Research.

    • 3 min
    • video
    Racial disparities in cancer outcomes: Dr Camille Ragin - Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, USA

    Racial disparities in cancer outcomes: Dr Camille Ragin - Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, USA

    Dr Ragin talks to ecancertv at the annual AACR congress, Washington DC, 6-10 April 2013, about disparities in cancer outcomes by race.

    Some cancers have higher rates in certain populations, this can be due to poor socio-economic status but also can have a biological basis.

    Dr Ragin discusses her work with the African-Carribean Cancer Consortium which carries out epidemiological research and notes how disparities might be addressed.

    • 7 min
    • video
    The aims of the WIN Consortium: Dr John Mendelsohn – MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA

    The aims of the WIN Consortium: Dr John Mendelsohn – MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA

    Dr John Mendelsohn talks with ecancer at the 2013 AACR Annual Meeting in Washington DC about the goals of the WIN Consortium and collaboration between clinical oncologists and pharmaceutical research scientists.

    Dr Mendelsohn explains the goals of the consortium and how they aim to develop procedures and a knowledge base for clinicians in order for their treatments to be most effective.

    • 3 min
    • video
    Myc inhibition in pre-clinical mouse models: Dr Laura Soucek - Vall d'Hebron Institute of Oncology

    Myc inhibition in pre-clinical mouse models: Dr Laura Soucek - Vall d'Hebron Institute of Oncology

    Dr Laura Soucek talks to ecancer at the 2013 AACR Annual Meeting in Washington DC about the inhibition of the Myc pathway in mouse models.

    The work conducted by the Mouse Models of Cancer Therapy group at the VHIO, led by Dr Laura Soucek, shows that Myc can be controlled and inhibited through a mutant called Omomyc that hijacks Myc and prevents it from acting.

    In the study, multiple lung tumours were induced in the mouse (up to 200 tumours in each individual) and Myc inhibition episodes were achieved by activating Omomyc expression for 4-weeks, followed by 4-week rest periods. This therapy - known as metronomic therapy - was maintained for more than a year, regularly checking tumour progress in each mouse.

    • 7 min
    • video
    Use of tobacco during cancer treatment: Dr Samantha Sobus – Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY

    Use of tobacco during cancer treatment: Dr Samantha Sobus – Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY

    Dr Samantha Sobus talks with ecancer at the 2013 AACR Annual Meeting in Washington DC about the continuation of nicotine use during radiation therapy.

    Continuing to smoke after cancer diagnosis has dramatic effects on both treatment and outcome, including drug resistance, tumour growth and increasing side effects of treatment.

    • 2 min
    • video
    Genome-wide methylation patterns suggest differences in breast cancer biology in American women of African and European ancestr

    Genome-wide methylation patterns suggest differences in breast cancer biology in American women of African and European ancestr

    Dr Ragin talks to ecancertv at the annual AACR congress, Washington DC, 6-10 April 2013, about disparities breast cancer biology by ancestry.

    European-American (EA) woman have a higher overall incidence of breast cancer than African American (AA) women, yet AA woman have poorer survival outcome, even after controlling for factors related to socioeconomic status.

    AA women are diagnosed at a younger age with aggressive breast tumours, more frequently ‘triple negative’ due to lack of estrogen and progesterone receptor (ER and PR) expression and negative for HER-2 amplification, as well as, high proliferative indices.

    These ‘triple negative’ breast cancers are most lethal since hormonal- or anti-HER2 therapy are not effective; therefore, fewer treatment options are available. Currently, the reason for racial disparities in breast cancer biology and early age of onset in AA women is largely unknown.

    Future analyses include screening a larger cohort of 1000 FFPE tumour DNAs to effectively compare differential methylation with age at onset, and a variety of tumour characteristics and risk factors. Funded by 1 R01 CA133264 to CBA, KD, and MJH, and by Cancer Center Support Grant CA16056 to RPCI.

    • 10 min

Top Podcasts In Medicine

More by ecancer