38 episodes

The Honkytonk Hitman, Mike Rodgers, a former professional boxer and country music singer hosts the About Nashville Podcast where he has casual conversations with the talented and interesting people that live in, around, or are just passing through Nashville.

About Nashville Podcast Mike Rodgers - Nashville - Country Music - Comedy - Tennessee - Acting - B

    • Music

The Honkytonk Hitman, Mike Rodgers, a former professional boxer and country music singer hosts the About Nashville Podcast where he has casual conversations with the talented and interesting people that live in, around, or are just passing through Nashville.

    Ep 37: Tyler Mahan Coe

    Ep 37: Tyler Mahan Coe

    Tyler Mahan Coe is the son of country music legend David Allan Coe.  Tyler hosts an incredibly entertaining and addictive podcast that's shaking up Music Row called, “Cocaine & Rhinestones".  We talked about him playing guitar in his father’s band, country music history, and his new podcast. The conversation heartfelt, candid, and raw in places; especially when we discussed his father. He tells a story involving Johnny Cash and his father that's almost too painful to hear.   

    • 1 hr 34 min
    Ep: 36: Top 18 in 2018 That Are Not Mainstream

    Ep: 36: Top 18 in 2018 That Are Not Mainstream

    The top 18 country music acts in 2018 you need to hear if you haven't already who are not mainstream.

    • 1 hr 57 min
    Trailer

    Trailer

    Previously, on About Nashville with Chris Hardwick, Tom Segura, Steve-O, Ray Scott, Jesse Case and Tommy Emmanuel.

    • 3 min
    Ep 35: The Day After CMA's

    Ep 35: The Day After CMA's

    CMA AWARDS/MOVIE REMAKES/THE WALKING DEAD Mike and Holly talk about the CMA awards, current movie remakes, the results of the presidential election, and then Mike makes another bold prediction about what's about to happen in 'The Walking Dead' television series.

    • 44 min
    Ep 34: Leon Everette

    Ep 34: Leon Everette

    RCA RECORDING ARTIST/ACTOR/ENTREPRENEUR Leon Everette was a successful RCA country music recording artist when he walked away from the music business while still on the top on the charts. His music career peaked between 1977 and 1985. He recorded eight studio albums, including five for the RCA Nashville label. He charted several singles during this time. He reached the top 10 of the country music charts with the singles "Over", "Giving Up Easy", "Hurricane", "Midnight Rodeo", "Just Give Me What You Think Is Fair", "Soul Searchin'", "My Lady Loves Me (Just as I Am)" and "I Could'a Had You". His story is phenomenal and is very inspirational. He didn’t shy away from any of the painful details. He was very candid and brutally honest. I’m glad he shared his story with us.

    • 1 hr 59 min
    Ep 33: Ray Rodgers

    Ep 33: Ray Rodgers

    GOLDEN GLOVES/SILVER GLOVES/CUTMAN Ray Rodgers, who was born in Oklahoma but grew up in Conway, was inducted into the Silver Gloves Hall of Fame in 2001, the Golden Gloves Hall of Fame in 2002 and the Arkansas Sports Hall of Fame in 2007. The late Billy Bock, a 1996 Arkansas Sports Hall of Fame inductee who was a well-known amateur boxer and later was among the pioneers of high school baseball in the state, told the Arkansas Democrat in 1990: “If it weren’t for Ray Rodgers, there would not be boxing left in Little Rock.” Silver Gloves is for amateur fighters ages 10-15. Golden Gloves is for amateur fighters ages 16 and older. Based in part on the Golden Gloves’ tie back to the Chicago Tribune, newspapers long have been among the main sponsors of amateur boxing events. The New York City Golden Gloves tournament, which has been around for 85 years, is sponsored by the Daily News. Rodgers told an interviewer in 2008: “It has a natural attraction to kids who are basically adventuresome and want to do something no one else does. That’s a lot of it. The dynamics of it hooked me in the fifth grade, and I’ve never been out of it one day. “In boxing, as in life and everything else, desire is half the deal. … I’m a great believer in amateur boxing. I think it’s one of the greatest sports ever devised. It’s a cliche, but it’s true. In boxing, you don’t have anybody to hand off to or to lateral or pass it off to. You’re on your own, brother. “The only discipline that lasts is self-discipline. You can stand a kid in a corner and whip his butt with a paddle. But once he learns self-discipline and the desire to do better in the ring, that sticks with him all his life.” Jermain Taylor is the most prominent example of the hundreds of boys (now men) Rodgers has helped through the years. Born in Little Rock in 1978, Taylor and his three younger sisters were abandoned by their father when the future champion was 5. Taylor began boxing at age 13 with Ozell Nelson as his trainer. Taylor’s Olympic bronze medal came in 2000 and his professional boxing debut was on Jan. 27, 2001, at Madison Square Garden against Chris Walsh. As noted in yesterday’s post, Rodgers has served as the cut man in Taylor’s corner throughout Taylor’s professional career. Taylor once said of Rodgers: “He’s the type of guy who comes in the dressing room and makes you feel comfortable. I’ve never seen him mad, not one time, and I’ve known him since I was 12. I’ve never seen him with a mean face. He’s the type of guy who always wants to see you smiling.” Rodgers’ father, who worked for 49 years for an oil company that eventually became part of Mobil, moved the family from Oklahoma to Conway so he could serve as a pump station engineer in Arkansas. Young Ray was already addicted to boxing at the time of the move. Ray Rodgers’ office at the Golden Gloves Education Center, which is adjacent to the Junior Deputy baseball fields just off Cantrell Road in Little Rock, now serves as sort of a museum of this state’s boxing history. There is, for example, a photo of Bock and Rodgers in 1959 at the state AAU boxing tournament with Miss Arkansas in between. “We were her escorts,” Rodgers says. Famous names in Arkansas business, sports and politics crop up as you look at the programs and bout sheets Rodgers has collected through the years. For instance, Buddy Coleman of Little Rock was the state AAU boxing chairman one year. Rodgers delights in talking about his 14-year amateur boxing career, delivering pithy quotes such as this one: “My left jab was so good the judges thought the other guy was sucking my thumb.” The Arkansas River Valley — from Fort Smith all the way down to Little Rock –was a boxing hotbed in those days. Rodgers tells of going across a low-water bridge to make it to a boxing tournament a

    • 1 hr 2 min

Customer Reviews

kaityn potts ,

Title is Kaitlyn Potts

You can FaceTime me right now

themusicfan07 ,

Inspiring

Mike has a great way of getting to the point with humor and honesty!

Natalie Bach-Hils ,

Great Source of Knowledge for a Newbie

As a New Yorker, I didn’t know very much about Nashville, country music, or that the two were even connected, but this was a good introduction for me even if it wasn’t geared to be. The Hitman is also a great host and excellent guide through the country world. Keep up the good work!

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