11 episodes

For more than 40 years, University at Buffalo student attorneys and faculty in the clinics have provided access to justice through the legal system for people and organizations who need our help. This podcast has been developed to share relevant aspects of our work, as well as work of our community partners, with a wider audience. DISCLAIMER: The information in this podcast episode “episode” is provided for general informational purposes only and may not reflect the current law in your jurisdiction. By listening to our episode, you understand that there is no attorney client relationship between you and the University at Buffalo School of Law’s Clinical Legal Education attorneys and podcast publisher. No information contained in this episode should be construed as legal advice from University at Buffalo School of Law’s Clinical Legal Education and/or the individual author, hosts, or guests, nor is it intended to be a substitute for legal counsel on any subject matter. No listener of this episode should act or refrain from acting on the basis of any information included in, or accessible through, this episode without seeking the appropriate legal or other professional advice on the particular facts and circumstances at issue from a lawyer licensed in the recipient’s state, country or other appropriate licensing jurisdiction.

AccessiBULL Justice - A Podcast of #UBLawResponds UBLaw Clinics

    • Education
    • 5.0 • 1 Rating

For more than 40 years, University at Buffalo student attorneys and faculty in the clinics have provided access to justice through the legal system for people and organizations who need our help. This podcast has been developed to share relevant aspects of our work, as well as work of our community partners, with a wider audience. DISCLAIMER: The information in this podcast episode “episode” is provided for general informational purposes only and may not reflect the current law in your jurisdiction. By listening to our episode, you understand that there is no attorney client relationship between you and the University at Buffalo School of Law’s Clinical Legal Education attorneys and podcast publisher. No information contained in this episode should be construed as legal advice from University at Buffalo School of Law’s Clinical Legal Education and/or the individual author, hosts, or guests, nor is it intended to be a substitute for legal counsel on any subject matter. No listener of this episode should act or refrain from acting on the basis of any information included in, or accessible through, this episode without seeking the appropriate legal or other professional advice on the particular facts and circumstances at issue from a lawyer licensed in the recipient’s state, country or other appropriate licensing jurisdiction.

    AccessiBull Justice Episode 11: Season Finale - The Niagara River Corridor and Ramsar Designation

    AccessiBull Justice Episode 11: Season Finale - The Niagara River Corridor and Ramsar Designation

    This podcast explores how, with this designation, the Niagara River Corridor became the 40th Ramsar site in the United States and joins more than 2,300 wetlands worldwide recognized for their rare and unique habitat, wildlife, and biological diversity. Ramsar sites are recognized as being of significant value not only for the country or the countries in which they are located, but for humanity as a whole.

    The work is not yet complete, as the Canadian designation is underway, which will hopefully lead to the first trans-national boundary Ramsar site in North America in the near future! Stay tuned to future episodes for updates on the progress.


    Guests:
    Jajean Rose-Burney –  Niagara River Ramsar Designation Steering Committee (US Co-Chair); Deputy Executive Director, Western New York Land Conservancy. Jajean is a planner focused on landscape conservation, bird conservation, and public engagement. He has lead important conservation efforts in Western New York and in Latin America, several of which have been recognized by local, national and international professional planning and conservation organizations. He is always available to help communities identify their important natural resources and find ways to protect them.
    Jocelyn Baker – Niagara River Ramsar Designation Steering Committee (Canadian Co-Chair); Co-ChairResearcher at Brock University / Sessional Instructor at Niagara College School of Environment. An innovative leader with over 25 years public service experience, working with all levels of government and academia including binational collaboration. Integrated, natural resource management, restoration and remediation, advanced project management expertise, including private sector initiatives.

    Host:
    Kim Diana Connolly - Professor of Law; Director, Clinical Legal Education Program; Director, Environmental Advocacy Clinic. 

    DISCLAIMER: The information in this podcast episode “episode” is provided for general informational purposes only and may not reflect the current law in your jurisdiction. By listening to our episode, you understand that there is no attorney client relationship between you and the University at Buffalo School of Law’s Clinical Legal Education attorneys and podcast publisher. No information contained in this episode should be construed as legal advice from University at Buffalo School of Law’s Clinical Legal Education and/or the individual author, hosts, or guests, nor is it intended to be a substitute for legal counsel on any subject matter. No listener of this episode should act or refrain from acting on the basis of any information included in, or accessible through, this episode without seeking the appropriate legal or other professional advice on the particular facts and circumstances at issue from a lawyer licensed in the recipient’s state, country or other appropriate licensing jurisdiction.
    Support the show (https://ubfoundation.buffalo.edu/giving/index.php?gift_allocation=01-3-0-08679)

    • 29 min
    AccessiBull Justice Episode 10: e-Law Center Clinic - A Guide to Entity Selection

    AccessiBull Justice Episode 10: e-Law Center Clinic - A Guide to Entity Selection

    This week, our episode is hosted by two current University at Buffalo School of Law Student Attorneys from the Entrepreneurship Law (e-Law) Center Clinic, Alex Kaczmarek '21 and Josh Roetzer '22. Alex and Josh provide educational information as to how entrepreneurs and start-ups (mainly in New York) decide which is the best entity to create when starting out and the factors that should be considered when starting the process of entity selection. The e-Law Center Clinic is directed by Matthew Pelkey, Esq. and information about the clinic can be found at: http://www.buffalo.edu/research/business/landing-pages/law-services-for-startups.html and https://www.law.buffalo.edu/beyond/clinics/entrepreneurship-law-center-clinic.html. 

    DISCLAIMER: The information in this podcast episode (“episode”) is provided for general informational purposes only and may not reflect the current law in your jurisdiction. By listening to our episode, you understand that there is no attorney client relationship between you and the University at Buffalo School of Law’s Clinical Legal Education attorneys and podcast publisher. No information contained in this episode should be construed as legal advice from University at Buffalo School of Law’s Clinical Legal Education and/or the individual author, hosts, or guests, nor is it intended to be a substitute for legal counsel on any subject matter. No listener of this episode should act or refrain from acting on the basis of any information included in, or accessible through, this episode without seeking the appropriate legal or other professional advice on the particular facts and circumstances at issue from a lawyer licensed in the recipient’s state, country or other appropriate licensing jurisdiction.
    Support the show (https://ubfoundation.buffalo.edu/giving/index.php?gift_allocation=01-3-0-08679)

    • 1 hr 10 min
    AccessiBull Justice Episode 9: The History of UB Law Clinics - A Discussion with former Dean Nils Olsen

    AccessiBull Justice Episode 9: The History of UB Law Clinics - A Discussion with former Dean Nils Olsen

    This week, we are thrilled to host former Dean of the University at Buffalo School of Law Nils Olsen. On this episode, Dean/ Professor Olsen and Vice Dean Kim Diana Connolly discuss the School of Law's long history which has a demonstrated commitment to access to justice through the experiential & clinical programs dating back decades. Our history has paved the way for our many pro bono initiatives, and the School of Law's call to respond to important legal issues with #UBLawResponds. 

    DISCLAIMER: The information in this podcast episode (“episode”) is provided for general informational purposes only and may not reflect the current law in your jurisdiction. By listening to our episode, you understand that there is no attorney client relationship between you and the University at Buffalo School of Law’s Clinical Legal Education attorneys and podcast publisher. No information contained in this episode should be construed as legal advice from University at Buffalo School of Law’s Clinical Legal Education and/or the individual author, hosts, or guests, nor is it intended to be a substitute for legal counsel on any subject matter. No listener of this episode should act or refrain from acting on the basis of any information included in, or accessible through, this episode without seeking the appropriate legal or other professional advice on the particular facts and circumstances at issue from a lawyer licensed in the recipient’s state, country or other appropriate licensing jurisdiction.


    Support the show (https://ubfoundation.buffalo.edu/giving/index.php?gift_allocation=01-3-0-08679)

    • 29 min
    AccessiBull Justice Episode 8: A Commitment to Access to Justice - A Discussion with Dean Aviva Abramovsky

    AccessiBull Justice Episode 8: A Commitment to Access to Justice - A Discussion with Dean Aviva Abramovsky

    The week, we are honored to host Dean Aviva Abramovsky to our newly rebranded podcast, "AccessiBULL Justice." On this episode, Dean Abramovsky and Vice Dean Kim Diana Connolly discuss the School of Law's commitment to access to justice through the experiential & clinical programs, pro bono initiatives, and the School of Law's call to respond to important legal issues with #UBLawResponds. 

    DISCLAIMER: The information in this podcast episode (“episode”) is provided for general informational purposes only and may not reflect the current law in your jurisdiction. By listening to our episode, you understand that there is no attorney client relationship between you and the University at Buffalo School of Law’s Clinical Legal Education attorneys and podcast publisher. No information contained in this episode should be construed as legal advice from University at Buffalo School of Law’s Clinical Legal Education and/or the individual author, hosts, or guests, nor is it intended to be a substitute for legal counsel on any subject matter. No listener of this episode should act or refrain from acting on the basis of any information included in, or accessible through, this episode without seeking the appropriate legal or other professional advice on the particular facts and circumstances at issue from a lawyer licensed in the recipient’s state, country or other appropriate licensing jurisdiction.
    Support the show (https://ubfoundation.buffalo.edu/giving/index.php?gift_allocation=01-3-0-08679)

    • 21 min
    BullShare Episode 7: COVID-19, Intimate Partner Violence and Communities of Color

    BullShare Episode 7: COVID-19, Intimate Partner Violence and Communities of Color

    *Warning* This Podcast may contain subject matters that may be triggering or difficult to hear.  Please note that this episode was recorded in November 2020.

    This podcast explores how minority survivors of Intimate Partner Violence (“IPV”) and Domestic Violence (“DV”) have been and continue to be impacted by pandemic, and how their safety has been increasingly compromised as a result of social distancing and isolation necessitated by COVID-19.  We explore how, for women of color, in particular, systemic and institutionalized racism has led to high rates of poverty, lower educational attainment, limited job resources, language barriers, and, for those who are undocumented, fear of deportation, which have made it increasingly difficult to find help and support services.  Our guests help us to understand how IPV and DV are often underreported in minority communities due to religious beliefs that may legitimize abusive behavior experienced; fear of isolation and alienation; loyalty to immediate and extended family; and distrust of law enforcement, among other factors.  Our guests also explain what may impact a survivor’s willingness or ability to report IPV they’ve either experienced or witnessed, and how BIWOC and Latinx are disproportionately and negatively impacted by the pandemic.  We also discuss ways in which we, as a community, can identify survivors who may need help and provide meaningful and effective resources to them.

    Guests:
    Aldiama Anthony – JD Candidate at University at Buffalo School of Law, 2020-2021 President of the Black Law Students Association at University at Buffalo School of Law, Honorary Law Student for the Women’s Bar Association of the State of New York Western New York Chapter
    Judy Torres – Director of Domestic Violence Services at Hispanics United of Buffalo, retired Dispatcher with the Buffalo Police Department

    Hosts:
    Peter Farrugia, JD Candidate at University at Buffalo School of Law, and Health Law & Policy and Healthcare Management MBA Candidate
    Lindsay Lougen, JD Candidate at University at Buffalo School of Law with a Concentration in Family Law Studies

    DISCLAIMER: The information in this podcast episode “episode” is provided for general informational purposes only and may not reflect the current law in your jurisdiction. By listening to our episode, you understand that there is no attorney client relationship between you and the University at Buffalo School of Law’s Clinical Legal Education attorneys and podcast publisher. No information contained in this episode should be construed as legal advice from University at Buffalo School of Law’s Clinical Legal Education and/or the individual author, hosts, or guests, nor is it intended to be a substitute for legal counsel on any subject matter. No listener of this episode should act or refrain from acting on the basis of any information included in, or accessible through, this episode without seeking the appropriate legal or other professional advice on the particular facts and circumstances at issue from a lawyer licensed in the recipient’s state, country or other appropriate licensing jurisdiction.
    Support the show (https://ubfoundation.buffalo.edu/giving/index.php?gift_allocation=01-3-0-08679)

    • 45 min
    BullShare Episode 6: How Survivors of Domestic Violence and Intimate Partner Violence, and Their Children, are Impacted by COVID-19

    BullShare Episode 6: How Survivors of Domestic Violence and Intimate Partner Violence, and Their Children, are Impacted by COVID-19

    *Warning* This Podcast may contain subject matters that may be triggering or difficult to hear.  Please note that this episode was recorded in November 2020.
    This podcast explores how survivors of Intimate Partner Violence (“IPV”) and Domestic Violence (“DV”), and their children, notably, have been and continue to be impacted by pandemic, and how their safety has been increasingly compromised as a result of social distancing and isolation necessitated by COVID-19.  We explore how prior to the pandemic, the CDC had reported that at least 1 in 7 children had experienced child abuse and/or neglect, while nearly 1,770 children died of abuse and neglect in the U.S., and how those numbers have likely increased significantly throughout the pandemic thus far, and may continue to increase if attention is not brought to the issue.  Our guests help us to better understand the impact child abuse and neglect can have on a child’s health and wellbeing into adulthood, and how exposure to violence has been proven to increase a child’s future risk of injury, violence, victimization, substance abuse, delayed brain development, lower educational attainment, and limited employment.  Families being forced to remain in close quarters for extreme amounts of time has proven socially, financially and psychologically stressful, to adults and children, and this stress has seeped into familial relationships, creating a second pandemic of dangerous and increasingly frequent family violence.  Our guests explain how survivors’ ability to access meaningful help is limited, as is a child’s ability to do so, given that schools are largely closed, and teachers and school counselors cannot easily access them.  Our guests suggest ways in which we, as a community, can identify survivors and/or children who may need help and provide meaningful and effective resources to them. 
    Guests:
    Hon. Mary G. Carney – Erie County Family Court Judge, Member of the New York State Bar Association, Women Lawyers of Western New York and the Womens Bar Association of Western New York
    Cameron Balon – Training specialist at Crisis Services Erie County and manager of Volunteer Advocates at Crisis Services

    Hosts:
    Peter Farrugia, JD Candidate at University at Buffalo School of Law, and Health Law & Policy and Healthcare Management MBA Candidate
    Lindsay Lougen, JD Candidate at University at Buffalo School of Law with a Concentration in Family Law Studies


     DISCLAIMER: The information in this podcast episode “episode” is provided for general informational purposes only and may not reflect the current law in your jurisdiction. By listening to our episode, you understand that there is no attorney client relationship between you and the University at Buffalo School of Law’s Clinical Legal Education attorneys and podcast publisher. No information contained in this episode should be construed as legal advice from University at Buffalo School of Law’s Clinical Legal Education and/or the individual author, hosts, or guests, nor is it intended to be a substitute for legal counsel on any subject matter. No listener of this episode should act or refrain from acting on the basis of any information included in, or accessible through, this episode without seeking the appropriate legal or other professional advice on the particular facts and circumstances at issue from a lawyer licensed in the recipient’s state, country or other appropriate licensing jurisdiction.


    Support the show (https://ubfoundation.buffalo.edu/giving/index.php?gift_allocation=01-3-0-08679)

    • 49 min

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