263 episodes

Dedicated to the promotion of a free and virtuous society, Acton Line brings together writers, economists, religious leaders, and more to bridge the gap between good intentions and sound economics. 
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Acton Line Acton Institute

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.7 • 132 Ratings

Dedicated to the promotion of a free and virtuous society, Acton Line brings together writers, economists, religious leaders, and more to bridge the gap between good intentions and sound economics. 
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    Anne Bradley & Iain Murray on socialism and poverty

    Anne Bradley & Iain Murray on socialism and poverty

    In this episode, we’re bringing you another conversation from our recent Poverty Cure Summit.
    The Poverty Cure Summit provided an opportunity for participants to listen to scholars, human service providers, and practitioners address the most critical issues we face today which can either exacerbate or alleviate poverty. These speakers discussed the legal, economic, social, and technological issues pertaining to both domestic and global poverty. Rooted in foundational principles of anthropology, politics, natural law, and economics, participants had the opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of the root causes of poverty and identify practical means to reduce it and promote human flourishing.
    In this conversation, moderator Scot Bertram talks with Anne Rathbone Bradley, the George and Sally Mayer Fellow for Economic Education and the academic director at The Fund for American Studies, and Iain Murray, vice president for strategy and senior fellow at the Competitive Enterprise Institute and author of the recent book, “The Socialist Temptation.” They discuss the reasons why socialism is not an effective method for reducing poverty and helping the poor regain their dignity. 
    Highlighting the inconsistencies in thought that prevent it from ever working in practice, the panel addresses why socialism seems to be an attractive option to some young Americans and how economic freedom can point the way toward a more prosperous country for all.
    Anne Rathbone Bradley - The Fund for American Studies
    Iain Murray - Competitive Enterprise Institute
    Scot Bertram - Hillsdale College
    The Socialist Temptation - Iain Murray
    Anne Rathbone Bradley on eliminating poverty through economic freedom - Acton Line
    Anne Rathbone Bradley on why Christians must support economic freedom - Acton Lecture Series
    The socialist temptation with Iain Murray - Acton Line
    Poverty Cure Summit
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    • 49 min
    Tim Carney on Alienated America (Rebroadcast)

    Tim Carney on Alienated America (Rebroadcast)

    Today’s episode is a rebroadcast that originally aired in March of 2019, but holds incredible relevance to conversations we’re still having today.
    This conversation with Tim Carney, editor at the Washington Examiner and a visiting fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, explores the subject matter of his 2019 book, “Alienated America: Why Some Places Thrive While Others Collapse." 
    To the extent that the "American Dream" is fading away in parts of the country, the problem isn't pure economics. Nor is it a case of stubborn old white men falling behind because they refuse embrace progress. Carney argues that the root cause of our problems – crumbling families, despair, and political dysfunction – is the erosion of community and local, civil institutions, most especially church. The result of a secularizing country is a plague of alienation for the working class, as people struggle to build families and improve their lives without the support structure they need.
    Alienated America: Why Some Places Thrive While Others Collapse - Tim Carney
    Video: Tim Carney On The Threat To Liberty From Big Business
    More churches, more flourishing: The secret to success in middle America - Joseph Sunde
    Lyman Stone on the decline of religiosity in the United States - Acton Line
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    • 32 min
    Rev. Robert Sirico on what we learned in 2020

    Rev. Robert Sirico on what we learned in 2020

    It’s been a challenging year.
    A global pandemic, violent unrest in the streets of major American cities, and a divisive presidential election have all challenged us in different ways, testing the strength of civil society and institutions at both the local and national level
    Throughout the year, Acton’s president and co-founder, Rev. Robert Sirico, has offered commentary on these events as they unfolded.
    Now, at the end of the year, Rev. Sirico reflects on the year as it comes to a close, to see how we handled the unique trials we encountered in our public life in 2020, and how the principles articulated by the Acton Institute guided us through these trying times and will continue to provide a mechanism for gaining understanding and perspective on our world in 2021.
    Rev. Robert Sirico's COVID-19 commentaries
    Rev. Robert Sirico on the Grand Rapids riots

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    • 37 min
    Maryann & Barry Keating on rebuilding social capital

    Maryann & Barry Keating on rebuilding social capital

    Social capital – the capacity of people to cooperate towards common aims – is an indispensable element of a free and prosperous society yet many studies demonstrate that it has been steadily eroded in recent decades.
    Social pathologies such as the breakdown of the family, addiction, and deaths of despair are strongly correlated with weakening social ties and norms. The decline in social capital has had devastating real world consequences.
    In this episode, Acton’s Dan Hugger talks with Maryann and Barry Keating, authors of the new book Rebuilding Social Capital, about the idea of social capital, its erosion, how economics and Catholic Social Teaching help to clarify the concept, and what their new research suggests is the path forward to rebuilding social capital.
    Rebuilding Social Capital at Acton Book Shop - Maryann & Barry Keating
    Excerpt from Rebuilding Social Capital - Maryann & Barry Keating
    Centesimus annus
     
    Gaudium et Spes
     
    Mater et Magistra
    ‘Values of Americans: A Study of Ethics and Character, Harris Interactive Report Produces by Boy Scouts of America Youth and Family Research Center’
    ‘4-H Experiences Contributing to Leadership and Personal Development of 4-H Alumni’
    ‘From Mutual Aid to Welfare State: How Fraternal Societies Fought Poverty and Taught Character’

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    • 38 min
    Philippa Stroud & Anne Bradley on pandemic and poverty

    Philippa Stroud & Anne Bradley on pandemic and poverty

    This week we’re bringing you another conversation from our recent Poverty Cure Summit.
    The Poverty Cure Summit provided an opportunity for participants to listen to scholars, human service providers, and practitioners address the most critical issues we face today which can either exacerbate or alleviate poverty. These speakers discussed the legal, economic, social, and technological issues pertaining to both domestic and global poverty. Rooted in foundational principles of anthropology, politics, natural law, and economics, participants had the opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of the root causes of poverty and identify practical means to reduce it and promote human flourishing.
    In this conversation, moderator Al Kresta talks with Baroness Philippa Stroud, CEO of the Legatum Institute, and Anne Rathbone Bradley, the George and Sally Mayer Fellow for Economic Education and the academic director at The Fund for American Studies, about poverty and the COVID-19 pandemic. 
    For decades, the number of individuals living in extreme poverty across the globe has fallen. Yet last month, the World Bank reported that COVID-19 could add approximately 100 million people to the ranks of those in extreme poverty by the end of 2020. The panelists examine how the pandemic has impacted poverty reduction efforts and how the marketplace has responded to the pandemic.
    Baroness Philippa Stroud - Legatum Institute
    Anne Bradley - The Fund for American Studies
    Poverty Cure Summit - Access now on-demand for only $19
    How to rebuild the economy after COVID-19 - Richard Turnbull
    A free-market agenda for rebuilding from the coronavirus - Henrik Rasmussen
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    • 47 min
    Walter Williams on Frederic Bastiat & American political culture

    Walter Williams on Frederic Bastiat & American political culture

    On December 2nd, 2020, the economist Walter E. Williams passed away at the age of 84.
    Williams worked his way out of grinding poverty in the Philadelphia housing projects to chair George Mason University’s economics department. Over his career he authored 10 books and more than 150 other publications, and become one of the most recognized commentators on our American public life of the last four decades. Williams spread his message of racial equality, the dignity of work, and the morality of capitalism through his syndicated newspaper column, PBS documentaries, and frequent radio and TV appearances.
    In this episode, we feature a conversation with Dr. Williams from 2014 for the Acton Institute’s podcast, then called Radio Free Acton. 
    Host Paul Edwards discusses with Williams the significance of Frederic Bastiat’s classic publication The Law, and the insights into modern America that come from reading that classic defense of limited government, authentic justice and human freedom. At that time, Williams had just penned a new introduction to The Law, which he said “created order in my thinking about liberty and just human conduct.”
    Walter Williams, RIP - Rev. Ben Johnson
    Ten quotes from economist Walter E. Williams - Sarah Stanley
    On liberty's moral superiority (Walter Williams interview in Religion & Liberty)
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    • 39 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
132 Ratings

132 Ratings

Ennio Piano ,

Godsend

Acton is today’s School of Salamanca :)

NC Boiler ,

Great content!

Please keep the episodes coming!

DCHCPA ,

Outstanding!

Great quality, fantastic podcast!

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