72 episodes

This is a podcast about Korean-American adoptees who return or repatriate to Korea to live and work in the country they were born in and separated from via international adoption. Funded by the US Fulbright program, the show seeks to educate the adoptive community, Korean people and the world at large about the experiences of these selected adult adoptees.

Adapted Kaomi Goetz

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.8, 44 Ratings

This is a podcast about Korean-American adoptees who return or repatriate to Korea to live and work in the country they were born in and separated from via international adoption. Funded by the US Fulbright program, the show seeks to educate the adoptive community, Korean people and the world at large about the experiences of these selected adult adoptees.

    Season 3, Episode 21: Kaomi Goetz

    Season 3, Episode 21: Kaomi Goetz

    Kaomi Goetz, 49, was adopted from Korea to the United States at the age of six months old. She grew up in rural Minnesota and was sexually abused by her adoptive father as a young girl. After producing more than 60 episodes of this podcast, Goetz has decided to share her story of how being an incest survivor has affected her and why freeing adoptee voices to frame their own adoption narrative has become so important to her. 
    This is the final episode of Season 3. 

    • 1 hr 14 min
    Season 3, Episode 20: Jae Hyun Shim

    Season 3, Episode 20: Jae Hyun Shim

    Jae Hyun Shim, 38, was adopted from Korea and grew up the youngest and only daughter and adopted child in their Minnesota family. But there were plenty of other adoptees in Shim's life from an early age and their parents took unusual steps to secure access to Korean-ness for Shim. That close relationship with their parents helped Shim to develop into the person they are. And meeting their biological family has also given Shim a perspective about the meaning of family. 

    • 1 hr 5 min
    Season 3, Episode 19: Daniel Kang Yoon Nørregaard

    Season 3, Episode 19: Daniel Kang Yoon Nørregaard

    This week, we'll hear from Daniel Kang Yoon Nørregaard, 33, adopted from Korea to Denmark at three months old, he talks about growing up in a predominately racially white environment, leaving his adoptive country to study design and eventually settling down in London. Though his career has been his focus, lately he's realized there are parts of himself that he's been disconnected from. And through his life experiences to date, he's been able to learn and explore his roots in a way that is meaningful for him right now. 

    • 44 min
    Season 3, Episode 18: Saschia Ryder

    Season 3, Episode 18: Saschia Ryder

    Growing up in the English countryside in a middle class family and attending private schools and later a boarding school, already would have set Saschia Ryder, 48, apart from many others with less-privileged backgrounds in the U.K. But she was also adopted from Korea --and like many transracially-adopted Koreans -- grew up in predominately white environments where she began to feel increasingly uncomfortable and invalidated through the years. Ryder talks about how she's been able to do some healing and come to terms with her own story, and the revelations that have followed. 

    • 1 hr 23 min
    Season 3, Episode 17: Kurt RuKim

    Season 3, Episode 17: Kurt RuKim

    Kurt RuKim [he/him], 34, was adopted from Korea and raised in the suburbs of Minneapolis, Minnesota. His identity has evolved over time, from living in predominately white spaces to embracing his authentic self as an Asian male and claiming his own body, being a dancer and racial equity activist and ally for others. RuKim also shares some of his experiences and observances being part of an interracial couple (Asian man and black woman), and resisting stereotypes and assumptions. 

    • 1 hr 4 min
    Season 3, Episode 16: Sooki Jalali

    Season 3, Episode 16: Sooki Jalali

    Sooki Jalali, 56, was adopted from Korea at the age of 12 or 14. She's not sure, and her paperwork gave her a different name and birth date, making her at least several years younger. Jun Sukja would take on a new name and identity in the U.S., but her new life often didn't seem like an escape from her old one in the orphanage. As a first wave internationally adopted Korean, she grew up in a small town in the Midwest where no one had seen a family like hers before. Ultimately, she learned to rely on herself and her own determination and self-care to help her find the path she is on today. 

    • 1 hr 21 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
44 Ratings

44 Ratings

SGM-joon ,

Incredible

Listening to these stories made me aware, informed, & empathic about adoptees, struggles, & their resilience.

reet roo ,

Great podcast

I am neither Asian nor adopted and I have learned so much from this podcast. It is always interesting and has certainly updated my views about adoption in general and transracial and transnational adoption. I highly recommend it.

the_ex_adoptee ,

More than a podcast...

I’ve been listening to Adapted for a while now and am beyond happy that this important work continues. I’m a Korean adoptee like those Kaomi interviews and features on Adapted. Growing up, there were very few Asian perspectives and voices that were accessible to me as mirrors or guides to my developing sense of identity as an Asian American. The same was even more true in regard to my Korean adoptee identity. This was before the internet, social media, and podcasts became ubiquitous.

Even now as a husband, father, and man aged fifty, I still find that I am on the journey of adoptee experience that began as a child leaving Korea to join an American family in the mid-seventies. The sense of connection and community that comes from hearing other Korean adoptees tell their stories, share their insights, and discuss their struggles and victories is almost beyond words.

When I say Adapted is more than another podcast, this is the meaning behind that. It’s a window into a shared experience. Listening to Adapted provides the opportunities to examine how these experiences compare and contrast and in doing so lend validity to each other’s variety of being and being adopted. I highly and I’m the most heartfelt way recommend listening to Adapted and don’t be surprised if the more you listen, the more you’ll take away.

Thank you Kaomi Goetz for this great gift to our community. 💕💕💕

Top Podcasts In Society & Culture

Listeners Also Subscribed To