100 episodes

Admissions Straight Talk is a weekly discussion of what's new, thought-provoking, and useful in the world of graduate admissions. Linda Abraham, leading admissions consultant and author, covers the application process for MBA, law school, medical school, and other graduate programs.

Admissions Straight Talk Linda Abraham

    • Education
    • 4.4 • 42 Ratings

Admissions Straight Talk is a weekly discussion of what's new, thought-provoking, and useful in the world of graduate admissions. Linda Abraham, leading admissions consultant and author, covers the application process for MBA, law school, medical school, and other graduate programs.

    The Only Online Ivy League Executive MBA Program

    The Only Online Ivy League Executive MBA Program

    Find out what's new at Wharton's Global EMBA program [Show Summary]







    Wharton’s first-ever online Global MBA Program for Executives is here and Dean Peggy Bishop Lane is diving into everything this exciting program has to offer for students across the globe.







    Interview with Peggy Bishop Lane, Vice Dean of the Wharton MBA Program for Executives [Show Notes]







    Welcome to the 490th episode of Admissions Straight Talk, Accepted's podcast. Thanks for tuning in. Before I dive into today's interview, I want to invite you to download Ace the EMBA: Expert Advice for the Rising Executive. This free guide will complement today's podcast and give you suggestions on how to choose the right Executive MBA program, differentiate yourself from your competition in a positive way, and present yourself effectively as a future business leader who will bring credit to any program lucky enough to have you. Download Ace the EMBA at accepted.com/aceemba.







    It gives me great pleasure to have, for the first time on Admissions Straight Talk, Peggy Bishop Lane, the Vice Dean of the Wharton MBA Program for Executives. Dean Bishop Lane earned her PhD in Accounting from Northwestern University. She started her professorial career at NYU Stern and then moved to Wharton in 1997. She has been the Vice Dean for the MBA Program for Executives and an Adjunct Professor of Accounting since 2012.











    To start, can you give an overview of the Wharton Global Executive MBA program, focusing on its more distinctive elements? [2:14]







    Absolutely. I think the main thing to know is that we intend for this global cohort to look very much like our existing Philadelphia and San Francisco cohorts. It's going to be the same curriculum with essentially the same faculty and the same admissions requirements. I hope that it's actually more similar to what people already know about our program than it is different. 







    Of course, what's unique is that you don't have to be in-person every other weekend as you do in Philadelphia and San Francisco. What we've created is a remote opportunity to do our program. With that said, it's very important to us that it's not fully remote because we know how important an in-person experience can be to the student experience. 







    The truly unique part for us is the residential factor here, and we've got six different residential weeks that we've incorporated into the program. The first two are purposely very close together because we want the students to create some relationships and then solidify them very shortly after. Right now, our Philadelphia and San Francisco cohorts start together in Philadelphia and we're going to start our Global cohort with them. So all three groups will start at the same time for about a week in Philadelphia, and our Global cohort will stay on a little bit longer to give them that opportunity to really get to know each other well. Then about three months later, we'll bring them back together in San Francisco. They'll get to see that campus and feel the connection to our group out in San Francisco for about a week as well. The third week to cap off their first year together will probably be in some location outside of the United State, but it’s still to be determined. Then we'll have three more residential weeks in the second year so that they can keep those bonds really alive.

    • 32 min
    How to Get Into Georgetown Law

    How to Get Into Georgetown Law

    Dreaming of a spot at Georgetown Law? Here's all you need to know [Show Summary]







    It’s hard to get a law education any closer to the heartbeat of policy and legal action than at Washington D.C.’s Georgetown Law School, labeled by the Washington Post as “the country’s most popular law school.” Andrew Cornblatt, the Dean of Admissions explains exactly what it takes to get accepted to this top-ranked and highly competitive program.











    Interview with Andrew Cornblatt, Dean of Admissions at Georgetown Law [Show Notes]







    Thanks for joining me for the 489th episode of Admissions Straight Talk. Are you applying to law school this cycle? Are you planning ahead to apply to law school next year or perhaps later? Are you competitive at your target programs? Accepted's Law School Admissions Quiz can give you a quick reality check. Just go to accepted.com/law-quiz, complete the quiz, and you'll not only get an assessment but also tips on how to improve your chances of acceptance. Plus it's all free. 







    For today's interview, I'm delighted to have Andrew Cornblatt, Metta and Keith Krach Dean of Admissions and Associate Vice President of Graduate Admissions and Enrollment at Georgetown Law. A graduate of Harvard University and Boston College School of Law, Dean Cornblatt has been a member of the Georgetown community since 1980. He became Dean of Admissions at Georgetown Law in 1991 and served as Dean of Admissions at the Georgetown Public Policy Institute, now the McCourt School of Public Policy from 2002 to 2016. It's hard to find someone with more experience in admissions.







    Can you give an overview of the more distinctive elements of the Georgetown Law School JD program? [2:36]







    I think the two things that are most unique about Georgetown are its size and its location. Georgetown Law is a large law school. I think it's among the largest in the United States, with 575 entering students. Even though it’s a big law school, we work very hard to make it a big law school with a small law school feel. These are small classes and the campus is beautiful. It's like a small college with lots of different buildings. We pay particular attention to individual students and their needs. We have big programs, but we have individual people who deserve individual attention and that's what we focus on. 







    As far as location goes, we’re right at the heart of Washington D.C. in the center of law in the USA. This is where everything gets made, interpreted, enforced, and implemented. That all happens within a 10-block radius of where I'm sitting right now in my office. When you have that as a resource, and that's available to you, it enhances the electricity of what you're studying. It's hands-on stuff, but it allows Georgetown to be at the crossroads of theory and practice.







    When I went to law school all those years ago, and when people go to law school now, so much of it is about the theory of law and what happened way back then and cases from the 1800s. All of that's important. I'm not saying it isn't. But this generation of law students is hands-on. They watch it happen on video.

    • 49 min
    Approaching Your MBA Application

    Approaching Your MBA Application

    Expert tips on how to approach your MBA application [Show Summary]







    What’s the right way to approach an MBA application? Like a productivity challenge? A jigsaw puzzle? A to-do list? Linda Abraham weighs in and shares her expert tips to master this process. 







    Linda Abraham, Founder and CEO of Accepted, shares her insights into how best to approach your MBA application [Show Notes]







    Welcome to the 487th episode of Admissions Straight Talk. Thanks for joining me. Today is going to be a solo show where I answer common questions while also providing information on how to approach your MBA application. If you're not applying for an MBA, there's still going to be a lot for you to learn from this episode, specifically from its strategic approach to the application process and its focus on using every element of the application to your advantage, not to mention thinking about where you want to end up after you get the degree.







    For you, MBAs, when you finish listening to this episode, you're invited to take a free six-question quiz at Accepted.com/MapMBA to see how well you've absorbed the lessons in this show. You'll also gain access to other relevant resources, both free and paid, that you can use as you attempt to incorporate the advice contained in this podcast into your strategy for a successful MBA application. 







    I realize it is an enormous effort to apply successfully to an MBA program, especially if you're applying to top MBA programs with acceptance rates like 6%, 10%, and 20%. That means they reject the overwhelming majority of applicants who submit applications.







    Indeed, the elite programs reject many, if not most, admissible candidates. You have a challenge, even if you have good stats, and that challenge is even greater if you don't. Actually, it's really a few challenges:







    * How can you make your application as impressive as possible?* How are you going to tell your story and effectively present the non-statistical elements of your application, specifically the essays and, when necessary, a video?* How can you make the process efficient?







    Those are the questions I'm going to address. Listen in. There's a lot to cover here.







    How to choose the right schools [2:47]







    The foundation of any effective application process is choosing the right schools to apply to. In order to determine what those schools are, you must have professional direction, defined for MBAs as having a preferred industry in which you want to work and a function you would like to perform. Note that this is not necessarily what you want to study. It's different. The basic question is, where do you want to end up? What's your goal for the MBA? Because that goal, or direction, becomes your north star in the application process and when you arrive on campus.







    You also need competitive academic qualifications. You're going to have to show through your application that you can handle both the communications and quantitative demands of a top MBA program. These qualifications are usually revealed via your transcript and your test score, but they can also be revealed via certifications and work experience, your application itself, your writing,

    • 19 min
    How to Get Accepted to Cornell Johnson MBA

    How to Get Accepted to Cornell Johnson MBA

    Tune in to hear all that Cornell Johnson's dynamic MBA program has to offer, and more [Show Summary]







    Eddie Asbie, Executive Director of Admissions and Scholarship at Cornell Johnson Graduate School of Management, dives into this dynamic program that equips students for careers in finance, tech, healthcare, and more. 







    Interview with Eddie Asbie, Executive Director of Admissions and Scholarship at Cornell Johnson Graduate School of Management [Show Notes]







    Welcome to the 488th episode of Admissions Straight Talk. Thanks for tuning in. Before we speak with our wonderful guest, I want to invite you to take advantage of a fantastic tool at Accepted, the MBA Admissions Quiz. Are you ready to apply to your dream MBA programs? Are you competitive at those programs? Accepted's MBA Admissions Quiz can not only give you a quick reality check, but also tips on how to improve your qualifications. Plus, it's all free. Use the calculator at accepted.com/mbaquiz.







    It gives me great pleasure to have, for the first time on Admissions Straight Talk, Eddie Asbie, Executive Director of Admissions and Scholarship at Cornell Johnson Graduate School of Management. Eddie earned his bachelor's in communications from the University at Buffalo and a masters from SUNY Buffalo in Student Personnel Administration. Between his undergraduate and graduate degrees, he worked at SUNY Buffalo and while in grad school, he served as an Admissions Advisor at the University of Buffalo. He joined the Johnson School in 2012 as an Assistant Director of Admissions and Financial Aid and became the Executive Director of Admissions and Scholarship in June 2021. 











    Can you give an overview of the Cornell Johnson full-time MBA program, focusing on its more distinctive elements? [2:16]







    We're located in Ithaca, New York, which is in central New York. Our MBA program is a general management MBA program that allows our students to really get the basic business fundamentals while also expanding personally and professionally throughout their career goals. We are known for elements of our program, such as our immersion learning program, which gives our students the opportunity to immerse themselves in their particular career paths. This happens in the spring semester of their first year. It gives students that hands-on experience while taking advanced level courses in their particular immersions so they can ultimately be able to hit the ground running with the internship itself.







    We also have Cornell Tech, MBA program located in New York City. If you are looking for a residential two-year program, there are opportunities for our program to collaborate with the Cornell Tech campus in New York City. 







    There are a lot of other great features like flexibility in the program to work with other departments. Our program really gives you the opportunity to customize the program the way you best see fit. We understand it's a business school, but we also understand the direction that our students are going into spans so many different industries, whether it is hospitality, healthcare, tech, or anything else. We have some great programs here at Cornell that allow students to be able to tap into other areas.







    Is there anything new at Cornell Johnson that you'...

    • 47 min
    How to Get Accepted to Graduate Engineering Programs

    How to Get Accepted to Graduate Engineering Programs

    All you need to know when applying to graduate engineering programs [Show Summary]







    How should you approach an application to a graduate engineering program? Dr. Karin Ash, a top-notch admissions consultant and career coach for aspiring engineers, shares everything you need to know. 







    Interview with Dr. Karin Ash, Accepted consultant and former Dir. of the Career Management Center at Cornell’s Johnson School, career coach at Cornell’s College of Engineering, and Dir. of Cornell Career Services [Show Notes]







    Welcome to the 486th episode of Admissions Straight Talk. Thanks for tuning in. Do you know how to get accepted to graduate engineering programs? Dr. Karin Ash does, and she shares her knowledge and insight in Accepted's guide, “Applying to Engineering Programs: What You Need to Know.” Download your free copy at accepted.com/486download. 







    Our guest today is Dr. Karin Ash, author of the guide that I just mentioned, and the former Director of Cornell University's Career Services, Director of the Career Management Center at Cornell Johnson School, and a career coach at Cornell's College of Engineering. Dr. Ash joined Accepted in 2015 as an admissions consultant and career coach. She has been guiding clients to acceptance at leading masters and PhD programs in engineering at top universities, including UC Berkeley, Carnegie Mellon, Cal Tech, Cambridge University, Columbia, Cornell, Duke Georgetown, Harvard, MIT, Northwestern, NYU, Stanford, UCLA, USC, University of Michigan, UT, UVA, and University of Washington, among others. She's here to discuss how to get accepted to graduate engineering programs.







    Much of your experience before joining Accepted was in the career guidance side of graduate and undergraduate education, how do employers influence admissions decisions? [2:16]







    They can influence it in a couple of ways. Let's say all of a sudden, a lot of employers decide they need more computer scientists. The programs at a university might expand the number of candidates that they are willing to bring in. It can also make a difference if they emphasize certain areas within an academic area. For example, they can say they need more calculus because the new hires are coming in with not as much math skills as they might need. So they can affect the curriculum. 







    The other way is if I'm sitting on an admissions committee and I going through files trying to decide who should be interviewed for a possible spot and an applicant’s story seems very clear, and it seems like they would not have a hard time finding employment. It can make a difference if I think the story doesn't make sense, and I don't think they're going to have an easy time getting employment. It doesn't mean they're totally out of the picture, but I might put them in another pile because schools get ranked somewhat based on what percentage of graduates find employment and what their salary level is. Those are some ways employers can influence admissions.







    I think teamwork has been a skill that employers have increasingly valued over the last 20-40 years. Is that something schools are emphasizing more in admissions decisions? [4:19]







    Absolutely. That's a good point, Linda. I think that's been true in the MBA world for quite a while, but with engineers,

    • 27 min
    How To Get Accepted To Washington University School Of Medicine in St. Louis

    How To Get Accepted To Washington University School Of Medicine in St. Louis

    What's new at Washington University School of Medicine? [Show Summary]







    Dr. Valerie Ratts, Associate Dean for Admissions at Washington University School of Medicine, shares what's new in the program, including the Gateway Curriculum and the virtual interview experience. 







    Interview with Dr. Valerie Ratts, Associate Dean for Admissions at Washington University School of Medicine [Show Notes]







    Welcome to the 485th episode of Admissions Straight Talk. Thanks for joining me today. Are you ready to apply to your dream medical schools? Are you competitive at your target programs? Accepted's Med School Admissions Quiz can give you a quick reality check. Just go to accepted.com/medquiz, complete the quiz, and you will not only get an assessment, but also tips on how to improve your chances of acceptance. Plus, it's all free. 







    Today's guest, Dr. Valerie Ratts, earned her MD at Johns Hopkins, where she also did her residency in obstetrics and gynecology as well as a fellowship in reproductive endocrinology. She joined the Washington University faculty in 1994 and currently serves as Associate Dean for Admissions and a Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Washington University School of Medicine. 











    Can you give us an overview of the WashU School of Medicine program focusing on its more distinctive elements? [1:52]







    Well, actually, our curriculum has changed since I last spoke to you. We're very excited about it. It's called the Gateway Curriculum. We're reimagining how we should best be educating medical students for the future and we deliver that in three phases.







    In phase one, we concentrate on the fundamentals and foundational modules in medicine. But we're integrating it the entire time. When you're getting basic science courses, we're integrating clinical problems, social sciences, health equity, and justice. All of those things come up during phase one. We also have clinical immersions during that period where students go into the clinical spaces for three weeks at three times during phase one. They’ll go to inpatient, outpatient, and peri-procedural spaces. The goal is not to be the physician. Yes, you get some clinical skills. Yes, you see how the different units work. But the goal is to get a perspective of how all the other healthcare providers in that space, including social workers, nurses, and pharmacists, work together. We think that medical students, at that point in their education, haven't quite learned all the bad habits that physicians get. They have a very unique perspective. We have small group sessions where the medical students will meet with other medical students and their professors to talk about the things that they observed in those spaces, good and bad. The thought is that when they become the physician down the road, they can reflect upon that period of time, and it will hopefully make them better doctors in the future. That's one of the things that we're doing in phase one, getting them very quickly into the clinical spaces and using that unique perspective that an early medical student has. 







    Then we have phase two. This is the gateway to clinical medicine.

    • 46 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
42 Ratings

42 Ratings

Nareg Keshishian ,

Very Insightful!

Linda does a great job answering many of the questions that are on students’ minds. These podcasts give greater insight into what schools are looking for in applicants that would otherwise be difficult to find elsewhere. I would highly recommend them to other applicants who are looking for more information about the admissions process for particular schools.

ShelbieJean ,

Very informative— A must listen

I first tuned in on the episode All About Duke’s Top-Ranked PA Program. There was various information presented that reached a good depth of understanding. Since that episode I have cycled back through other episodes and tune in on my daily commute to work. Thank you for sharing this knowledge!

CC_Babi ,

I wish this existed when I was younger!

Linda provides so much valuable information on the college admissions process. I just wish this resource existed when I was younger! So glad to refer this show to anyone who has a family member going to college soon because this show answers so many questions. -Valerie Zaric

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