21 episodes

After the ‘End of History’ is a podcast about International Relations Theory and History.

After the ‘End of History‪’‬ After the 'End of History'

    • History
    • 5.0 • 29 Ratings

After the ‘End of History’ is a podcast about International Relations Theory and History.

    Excerpt: Bonus Episode No. 2 -- Of Neurotics and NATO

    Excerpt: Bonus Episode No. 2 -- Of Neurotics and NATO

    The following is an excerpt of the upcoming release of Episode 22 on The Longer Telegram.

    To hear the full episode, please consider subscribing to our Patreon at patreon.com/afterhistory.  Subscribers receive early access to new episodes, including Bonus recordings and written material under the "For Subscribers" page of Hawks & Sparrows. 

    Thanks for your support. 

    • 7 min
    Trade Wars Are Class Wars: Part II - Smith, Ricardo, Containers, and Tax Law

    Trade Wars Are Class Wars: Part II - Smith, Ricardo, Containers, and Tax Law

    Welcome to Episode 20 of After the 'End of History.' 

    Adam Smith's thoughts on industrial specialization and David Ricardo's theory of comparative advantage take center stage in this week's discussion on Chapter 1 of Pettis & Klein's Trade Wars Are Class Wars. We also consider how the history of globalization has borne out their insights in light of the rise of containerization and the production of intermediate goods around the globe.

    While the world's economy operates in an increasingly interconnected manner, the methods by which economists traditionally track international trade have been disrupted by breathtaking Tax Avoidance schemes and overly simplified bilateral trade accounting. We discuss the role this plays in distorting the true extent of global economic integration, which can lead to harmful macroeconomic policy and create unnecessary tensions in the interstate system (chiefly between the US and China). 

    The music that you hear on After the 'End of History' is kindly provided by Jason King.

    If you're interested in becoming a subscriber of the show, please visit our Patreon at patreon.com/afterhistory. You can also find us at hawksnsparrows.com. 

    • 53 min
    Trade Wars Are Class Wars: Part I -- Hobson and Lenin on Imperialism

    Trade Wars Are Class Wars: Part I -- Hobson and Lenin on Imperialism

    After a hiatus, we return with a brief introduction to the thought and influence of JA Hobson, whose 1902 work "Imperialism" forms the intellectual pivot around which Pettis & Klein's "Trade Wars Are Class Wars" (2020, Yale University Press) presents its central thesis: inequality within countries intensifies trade conflicts between nations.

    This is the first in a multi-part discussion on Pettis & Klein's thoughtful book, a polemical take on the roots and dangers of global trade imbalances. Connecting this research to our last discussion on Mahbubani, we ask: How does the macroeconomic picture painted by Pettis & Klein contribute to our understanding of the growing rivalry between the US and China?

    Jason King provides the music you hear in After the 'End of History.'

     After the 'End of History' is part of the Hawks & Sparrows project. 

    • 41 min
    Has China Won? Part III -- Mahan, Island Chains and Carriers

    Has China Won? Part III -- Mahan, Island Chains and Carriers

    Episode XVIII takes a detour from Mahbubani's "Has China Won?" and looks closely at the military side of the burgeoning strategic conflict between the American hegemon and its rival to the East.

    Focusing on three texts by a group of naval experts, we discuss how Alfred T. Mahan has been central to China's grand strategy for the Pacific and how its military planners' view of the First Island chain, a simple but unfortunate geospatial reality, forms a critical aspect of their conception of China's place in the world. Finally, to Mahbubani's question, "Can the US make U-Turns?" we test the question against military expenditures on outdated platforms and weapons systems in the Pacific.

    We head into our final discussion on "Has China Won?" by sharing some thoughts on how these military-strategic works have reframed our earlier, perhaps overly optimistic view of China's successes. On the next episode, we'll continue exploring that question through the lens of economics, centrally focused on Pettis and Klein's "Trade Wars are Class Wars."

    Works under discussion:

    Michael J. Green: By More Than Providence
    T. Yoshihara and J. Holmes: Red Star Over the Pacific
    Jerry Hendrix: At What Cost a Carrier?

     Thanks for listening. 

    Jason King provides the music you hear in After the 'End of History.' 

    • 1 hr 16 min
    Has China Won? Part II -- Virtues, Alliances and Debates

    Has China Won? Part II -- Virtues, Alliances and Debates

    Part II drills into Mahbubani's discussion of "how other countries will choose" in the coming showdown between China, a burgeoning regional hegemon, and the United States, the ostensibly failing empire. 

    From there we review last year's debate between Mahbubani and John Mearsheimer which took place virtually, in the midst of the pandemic's first wave, at the Center for Independent Study. We're particularly interested in how each thinker frames his views on military conflict, counterbalancing and alliance building. We also share some thoughts on who won the debate, noting the stark differences in outlook -- somewhat panglossian in Kishore's case; hardcore realist in John's -- and revisit the ideas of our old friend Christopher Layne, whose recent work in Foreign Affairs sheds classical neorealist light on the debate. 

    Join us next week for a discussion on Pettis and Klein's "Trade Wars are Class Wars." 

    Jason King provides the music you hear in After the 'End of History.' 

    • 1 hr 42 min
    Has China Won? Part I -- Framing the Stakes of China's Rise

    Has China Won? Part I -- Framing the Stakes of China's Rise

    Episode 16: Sacred Cows, Institutional Orthodoxies

    Kishore Mahbubani, author of last year's "Has China Won? The Chinese Challenge to American Primacy," is an academic and diplomat, serving as Singapore's delegate to the UN for over ten years. On this week's episode of After the 'End of History' we introduce his work on the stakes of China's rise, which presents an "inevitable but avoidable" clash vis a vis American hegemony. It should be clear by the end of this week's discussion -- the first part of three -- that he answers his title's question with a resounding yes, challenging the institutional orthodoxies of American foreign policy thought.

    Mahbubani believes that America lacks the strategic vision necessary to engage an undeniably rising China in a rational and geopolitically productive manner. But, perhaps more damning, it also behaves inflexibly, failing to temper its ingrained "exceptionalist" thinking to concede a second-place or even equal position of economic, military and political power in the world. This failure to make "U-Turns," among other problems in American foreign policy with respect to China, provides the basis of our discussion this week.

    Our material for this series of conversations also includes a debate between Mahbubani and John Mearsheimer. The third part will consider the recent economic work of Pettis & Klein, whose acclaimed "Trade Wars are Class Wars"  helps makes sense of the rise of inequality in the age of globalization, a question that places China's steady integration into the international market front and center. 

    Thanks to Jason King, who provides the music that you hear on After the 'End of History.'  

    • 1 hr 6 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
29 Ratings

29 Ratings

Gig from Jersey ,

One Podcast to Rule Them All

Tom and Mario do the impossible — make my small squirrel brain think critically about complex global issues while still being easily digestible. Would recommend to anyone. Keep up the good work!

AJDP in LA ,

Excellent scholarly critique of American imperialism

The two hosts this podcast have certainly done their homework. Fascinating listen for anyone concerned about the American of Legacy of violence.

trudatnyc ,

not your usual politico wonks

this is a great listen if you want a fresh take on global politics. the hosts provide some keen insights through the lens of classic & contemporary books on IR theory. get your brain working again 🧠

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