99 episodes

After the Fact is a podcast from The Pew Charitable Trusts that brings you data and analysis on the issues that matter to you—from our environment and the sciences, to larger economic trends and public health. Experts from Pew and other special guests discuss the numbers and trends shaping some of society’s biggest challenges with host Dan LeDuc, then go behind the facts with nonpartisan analysis and stories.

After the Fact The Pew Charitable Trusts

    • Government
    • 4.6, 106 Ratings

After the Fact is a podcast from The Pew Charitable Trusts that brings you data and analysis on the issues that matter to you—from our environment and the sciences, to larger economic trends and public health. Experts from Pew and other special guests discuss the numbers and trends shaping some of society’s biggest challenges with host Dan LeDuc, then go behind the facts with nonpartisan analysis and stories.

    Fan Favorite: Scientists at Work—Why Do Mosquitoes Bite You?

    Fan Favorite: Scientists at Work—Why Do Mosquitoes Bite You?

    Story: With summer heating up, we’re again sharing our conversation with Pew biomedical scholar and Princeton scientist Lindy McBride about one of the peskiest and deadliest insects on the planet: the mosquito. Listen in for the facts about mosquitoes and why they find some people tastier than others.

    • 14 min
    The New American Library

    The New American Library

    Stat: 78 percent: About 8 in 10 adults feel that libraries help them find information that is trustworthy and reliable.
    Story: Everybody knows what happened on the Fourth of July, but what about the First of July? That’s the anniversary of America’s first free library. Established in 1731 by Ben Franklin, it marked the democratization of information. Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden—the first woman and African American in that role—talks about how libraries and librarians continue that mission to this day.
     

    • 16 min
    The Infodemic

    The Infodemic

    Stat: 87 percent: Americans who say they are following news about the coronavirus outbreak fairly or very closely.
    Story: According to the World Health Organization, people are not only living through an epidemic but also an “infodemic”—a surge of information about COVID-19 that has made it hard for people to know which news and guidance about the virus is accurate. In a conversation with Alan Miller, founder and CEO of the News Literacy Project, we discuss how to sort fact from fiction today.

    • 15 min
    Scientists at Work: The Big Idea Between a Small Fish and Heart Disease

    Scientists at Work: The Big Idea Between a Small Fish and Heart Disease

    Stat: 48% of U.S. adults have cardiovascular disease, according to the American Heart Association.
    Story: What do zebrafish have to do with human health? As it turns out, they can help researchers understand how and why heart disease happens. We spoke to Pew biomedical scholar (2002) Steven Farber at the Carnegie Institution for Science to learn more about his work, which is revealing new strategies to combat heart disease, diabetes, and obesity.

    • 15 min
    The Broadband Gap—Who’s Not Online in America Today?

    The Broadband Gap—Who’s Not Online in America Today?

    Stat: 21 million: The number of Americans not connected to broadband internet, according to the Federal Communications Commission.
    Story: While most Americans are managing remote work, learning, and even participating in social gatherings online during the pandemic, there are still millions of Americans who don’t have access to high-speed internet where they live. Kathryn de Wit, manager of Pew’s broadband research initiative, explains who’s not online and shares what some states and communities are doing to bridge connectivity gaps.

    • 12 min
    Re-Release: The Future of Learning--What Do We Know About the Brain Today?

    Re-Release: The Future of Learning--What Do We Know About the Brain Today?

    Story: With schools and universities closed and millions now learning and working from home because of the coronavirus, Pew’s latest edition of Trend magazine focuses on the topic of learning. In this rebroadcast featuring two Stanford University researchers with an essay in the magazine, you’ll hear about how breakthroughs in neuroscience and technology have given us insights into the human mind and how those findings are being applied in classrooms today.

    • 22 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
106 Ratings

106 Ratings

ok tr ,

Excellent

Good content and concise presentation.

LogeNonDorma ,

Very informative and non-ideological

This podcast is a great source for insights into emerging trends in American society, without an ideological axe to grind.

AshevilleintheFall ,

Great insight in short amount of time

Pew presents clear insights on a wide range of topics in a short amount of time. Great for those of us interested in a wide variety of subjects and curious about what we don’t know as well.

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