30 episodes

From addiction to digital devices to the search for the roots of yoga, Al Jazeera correspondents take us on their journeys of discovery.

Al Jazeera Correspondent Al Jazeera English

    • News
    • 4.5, 8 Ratings

From addiction to digital devices to the search for the roots of yoga, Al Jazeera correspondents take us on their journeys of discovery.

    • video
    Without a legal trace: Eradicating statelessness in Kyrgyzstan | Talk to Al Jazeera

    Without a legal trace: Eradicating statelessness in Kyrgyzstan | Talk to Al Jazeera

    When the Soviet Union was dissolved in 1991, newly independent states emerged.

    These new borders meant that all of a sudden people found themselves on the wrong side - foreigners in a country they called their home, but were unable to prove or formally claim as such.

    The United Nations refugee agency estimates that at least 280 million people lost their citizenship during the formation of post-Soviet republics, including in Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, and Kyrgyzstan.

    Nearly 30 years later, thousands across the region live without any legal trace - many of them having inherited their statelessness from their parents.

    Azizbek Ashurov is a Kyrgyz lawyer, and founder of the Ferghana Lawyers Without Borders association. He has spent more than a decade fighting for the rights of thousands of stateless people in his country.

    To access those in need, Ashurov and his team first had to figure out how many people lacked legal identity, and find ways to help them. With an estimated two-thirds of Kyrgyzstan's six million people living in rural areas, the team spent much of their time in the hills and villages of the Ferghana valley which spreads across parts of Uzbekistan, Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan.

    The work has had an effect.

    The NGO has helped more than 10,000 stateless people in Kyrgyzstan gain citizenship, and some 2,000 children now have access to education, health and a more promising future.

    Kyrgyzstan is now a leading example of how statelessness can be eradicated - there are no more known cases of people living there without a legal identity.

    Talk to Al Jazeera travelled to Kyrgyzstan to meet Ashurov and some of the people he has helped.

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    • 24 min
    • video
    Ali Ismael: Egypt's Musical Maestro | Al Jazeera World

    Ali Ismael: Egypt's Musical Maestro | Al Jazeera World

    Egypt's cinema was prolific from the 1940s to the 1960s, a time when the stars of the silver screen captivated a generation of movie-goers.

    But the films' soundtracks were just as much a part of the appeal of these Arab cinema classics, and the man behind the vibrant rhythms of more than 350 movies was the legendary composer, Ali Ismael.

    It was through playing the saxophone in the nightclubs of downtown Cairo that Ismael found his niche, and where he met the Greek film composer, Andre Ryder, who got him into movies.

    An ardent supporter of former Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser, Ismael also wrote many patriotic songs.

    Leave My Sky flew the flag during the Suez Crisis in the 1950s, and his music filled the airwaves during the 1967 Arab-Israeli War. Flags of Victory also inspired Egyptian forces when they reclaimed Sinai in 1973, and the song, Fida'i' or 'Warrior, also composed by Ismael, later became the Palestinian national anthem.

    Ismael's life and career were cut short in 1974 when he suffered a sudden, fatal heart-attack aged only 51. His military funeral was widely covered by the press and also shown in cinemas.

    Until today, his legacy remains as a prolific composer who brought joy to millions and whose songs became Arab classics.

    In this rich and colourful documentary, Al Jazeera World tells the multi-layered story of the musician's relatively short but successful life and career. Combining high-quality performances with incisive interviews, the film pays tribute to an Egyptian musical icon, whose popularity and cultural influence were felt by an entire generation across the Arab world.

    • 46 min
    • video
    ILO chief: Workers in informal economy face 'utter destitution' | Talk to Al Jazeera

    ILO chief: Workers in informal economy face 'utter destitution' | Talk to Al Jazeera

    The coronavirus pandemic has changed the way we live.

    Nearly every country in the world has been affected. There have already been millions of infections, and hundreds of thousands of deaths.

    And while scientists work on developing a vaccine, governments are focusing on reducing the number of infections through social distancing and other preventive measures.

    But these restrictions have brought with them countless financial losses across the globe. The coronavirus recession is considered to be the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression of 1929.

    As COVID-19 measures halt international trade, shut down airports and leave businesses bankrupt, tens of millions of people have lost their jobs. And for many, being unemployed in the middle of a pandemic means not only losing their income but also losing access to healthcare.

    So, how can governments protect their workers and rebuild their economies?

    The director-general of the International Labour Organization (ILO), Guy Ryder, talks to Al Jazeera.

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    • 25 min
    • video
    Palestine Sunbird: A Stamp of Defiance | Al Jazeera World

    Palestine Sunbird: A Stamp of Defiance | Al Jazeera World

    Palestinian protest against Israeli occupation has taken many forms in the past seven decades - from all-out Arab-Israeli war, to the Intifadas and the Great March of Return.

    On a global level, Palestinian leaders continue to lobby for increased international recognition of the State of Palestine.

    Meanwhile, on a smaller scale, other forms of self-determination are emerging.

    In his own form of dissent, artist Khaled Jarrar designs postage and passport stamps for the State of Palestine, using the Palestine sunbird as the motif.

    His stamps have been officially recognised by the postal services in Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands, Norway and the Czech Republic.

    Jarrar’s is a protest in an artistic context, one that began in his home town of Ramallah in the occupied West Bank.

    There, he designed a Palestinian visa stamp saying 'State of Palestine' which he began offering to international visitors, including a Jewish American woman with dual US-Israeli nationality. He stamped both her passports with the Palestine sunbird, but when she later went through Israeli immigration, officials interrogated her and cancelled her passport.

    In this Al Jazeera World film, we watch as Jarrar achieves a major breakthrough when Germany’s Deutsche Post accepts his design. An initial print run of 4,000 postage stamps quickly sells out, and he soon sells more than 28,000 German Palestine sunbird stamps, while also stamping hundreds of passports of tourists on the streets of Berlin.

    This is one man’s story of a peaceful Palestinian protest - but with a difference. It is the journey of a charismatic artist’s creative yet provocative way of promoting the Palestinian cause across the world.

    • 46 min
    • video
    Samantha Power: 'US is pulling away from its democratic allies' | Talk to Al Jazeera

    Samantha Power: 'US is pulling away from its democratic allies' | Talk to Al Jazeera

    In September 2016, nearly two months before the then-presidential candidate Donald Trump's election, United States President Barack Obama spoke at the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA).

    "As I address this hall as president for the final time, let me recount the progress that we've made," he said, "A quarter-century after the end of the Cold War, the world is by many measures less violent and more prosperous than ever before …"

    But with millions displaced worldwide, unresolved conflicts from Yemen to Syria, Iraq to Afghanistan, and armed groups like ISIL (ISIS) and al-Qaeda launching attacks against civilians, was Obama's speech too optimistic?

    And in the years since, how has US foreign policy changed under President Trump? And what should have been done differently?

    Samantha Power served at the US ambassador to the UN from 2013 to 2017.

    As Obama's top UN diplomat at the time, she was responsible for securing international consensus on a variety of pressing issues at the UN Security Council (UNSC) and the UNGA.

    To discuss the Trump presidency, the difference between Trump and Obama's responses to global health crises, and China's increasing influence on international organisations, she talks to Al Jazeera.

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    • 25 min
    • video
    Qatar health minister: 'Coronavirus rate not high, but realistic' | Talk to Al Jazeera

    Qatar health minister: 'Coronavirus rate not high, but realistic' | Talk to Al Jazeera

    It has been nearly two months since Qatar implemented a series of measures to contain the outbreak of COVID-19, the highly infectious respiratory disease caused by the novel coronavirus.

    The government has since closed schools, issued stay-at-home orders and imposed travel bans on travellers from many countries.

    But while the number of deaths here remains low, infection rates continue to rise.

    On Talk to Al Jazeera, we speak to Qatar's minister of public health, Dr Hanan Mohamed al-Kuwari, about the government's efforts to tackle the COVID-19 pandemic.

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    • 24 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
8 Ratings

8 Ratings

thebigch7 ,

Eye opening, important

This is fantastic documentary filmmaking. Absolutely riveting. Changes my perspective with every new episode.

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