20 min

Alcohol Alert - June 2022 Alcohol Alert Podcast

    • News Commentary

Hello and welcome to the Alcohol Alert, brought to you by The Institute of Alcohol Studies.

In this edition:

International experts call for ban on all alcohol promotion 🎵 Podcast feature 🎵

‘No clear evidence’ MUP reduces harmful drinking

Vast difference in alcohol-related deaths remains between richest and poorest in Scotland

Contents Unknown: How alcohol labelling still fails consumers

‘No place for cheap alcohol: The potential value of minimum pricing for protecting lives’

Sobriety tags rolled-out further despite no evidence of efficacy

Irish Government makes moves to improve product labelling

Brexit Freedoms Bill could deliver pint-sized wine bottles

No and low alcohol sales double in the UK

Alcohol Toolkit Study: update

We hope you enjoy our roundup of stories below: please feel free to share. Thank you.

IAS Blogs

To read blogs click here.

International experts call for ban on all alcohol promotion 🎵 Podcast feature 🎵

Realising Our Rights, a new report launched on 28 June by Alcohol Focus Scotland (AFS) and a group of subject experts, calls on governments across the world to introduce comprehensive restrictions on alcohol marketing in order to improve health.

The publication explains how increasingly sophisticated marketing means that people are being constantly bombarded with positive messages about how alcohol enhances their lives. The alcohol marketing experts who helped develop the report point out that this seeks to build long-term relationships between people and alcohol brands, which reinforce alcohol as a social norm and ultimately contribute to high levels of consumption and harm across the world.

They particularly draw attention to at-risk population groups, with children and young people, and people at risk of an alcohol problem, more affected than others.

A number of additional pieces of research were commissioned to help develop the report, including research examining the impact of alcohol marketing on people with an alcohol problem. The complementary research found that this demographic has an increased susceptibility to alcohol marketing, which fosters positive alcohol-related emotions and increases their likelihood of drinking.

The group’s recommendations include:

Additional research for the report included analysing case studies from seven countries with marketing restrictions, to understand the processes, successes and challenges to introducing these restrictions. These case studies can be used by countries looking to introduce similar restrictions, to better understand issues around:

Utilising a window of opportunity

Opposition from the alcohol industry

How to frame regulations

Use of evidence and arguments

The AFS report includes a human rights-based approach to marketing restrictions, highlighting that states have a legal obligation to protect citizens’ rights – such as the right to health – and that commodities that infringe on these rights need further restriction.

AFS’ Chief Executive, Alison Douglas, said:

“The current self-regulatory approach to alcohol marketing is failing to protect people and has led to our communities being wallpapered with promotions for a product that harms our health.

“People don’t just have a need to be protected from alcohol marketing they have a right to be protected.  A number of other countries have already imposed bans on alcohol marketing, if we want to create a more positive culture where everyone can realise their right to health, the UK and Scottish governments must act to restrict alcohol marketing.”

The Scottish Government is consulting this year on marketing restrictions, and the Minister for Public Health, Maree Todd said:

“I welcome this report and will study carefully its detailed findings and recommendations. I am determined to tackle the harmful impacts that alcohol marketing can have on children and young people, as well as the triggering effect it can have on heavy drinke

Hello and welcome to the Alcohol Alert, brought to you by The Institute of Alcohol Studies.

In this edition:

International experts call for ban on all alcohol promotion 🎵 Podcast feature 🎵

‘No clear evidence’ MUP reduces harmful drinking

Vast difference in alcohol-related deaths remains between richest and poorest in Scotland

Contents Unknown: How alcohol labelling still fails consumers

‘No place for cheap alcohol: The potential value of minimum pricing for protecting lives’

Sobriety tags rolled-out further despite no evidence of efficacy

Irish Government makes moves to improve product labelling

Brexit Freedoms Bill could deliver pint-sized wine bottles

No and low alcohol sales double in the UK

Alcohol Toolkit Study: update

We hope you enjoy our roundup of stories below: please feel free to share. Thank you.

IAS Blogs

To read blogs click here.

International experts call for ban on all alcohol promotion 🎵 Podcast feature 🎵

Realising Our Rights, a new report launched on 28 June by Alcohol Focus Scotland (AFS) and a group of subject experts, calls on governments across the world to introduce comprehensive restrictions on alcohol marketing in order to improve health.

The publication explains how increasingly sophisticated marketing means that people are being constantly bombarded with positive messages about how alcohol enhances their lives. The alcohol marketing experts who helped develop the report point out that this seeks to build long-term relationships between people and alcohol brands, which reinforce alcohol as a social norm and ultimately contribute to high levels of consumption and harm across the world.

They particularly draw attention to at-risk population groups, with children and young people, and people at risk of an alcohol problem, more affected than others.

A number of additional pieces of research were commissioned to help develop the report, including research examining the impact of alcohol marketing on people with an alcohol problem. The complementary research found that this demographic has an increased susceptibility to alcohol marketing, which fosters positive alcohol-related emotions and increases their likelihood of drinking.

The group’s recommendations include:

Additional research for the report included analysing case studies from seven countries with marketing restrictions, to understand the processes, successes and challenges to introducing these restrictions. These case studies can be used by countries looking to introduce similar restrictions, to better understand issues around:

Utilising a window of opportunity

Opposition from the alcohol industry

How to frame regulations

Use of evidence and arguments

The AFS report includes a human rights-based approach to marketing restrictions, highlighting that states have a legal obligation to protect citizens’ rights – such as the right to health – and that commodities that infringe on these rights need further restriction.

AFS’ Chief Executive, Alison Douglas, said:

“The current self-regulatory approach to alcohol marketing is failing to protect people and has led to our communities being wallpapered with promotions for a product that harms our health.

“People don’t just have a need to be protected from alcohol marketing they have a right to be protected.  A number of other countries have already imposed bans on alcohol marketing, if we want to create a more positive culture where everyone can realise their right to health, the UK and Scottish governments must act to restrict alcohol marketing.”

The Scottish Government is consulting this year on marketing restrictions, and the Minister for Public Health, Maree Todd said:

“I welcome this report and will study carefully its detailed findings and recommendations. I am determined to tackle the harmful impacts that alcohol marketing can have on children and young people, as well as the triggering effect it can have on heavy drinke

20 min