69 episodes

Start each workday with digestible nuggets on the benefits of running a lean organization. We cover 5 topics in 5 days in about 5 minutes.

1. Leadership- Discover key concepts for successfully leading your organization during its lean transformation.
2. Culture/Intrapreneurship- Learn how to support your intrapreneurs, those who are driving change within your organization.
3. Lean Topics- Still catching on to lean principles and methodologies? We’ll help you with the basics and advanced topics.
4. Industry 4.0- Learn how smart manufacturing, smart factories, the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), and more will change the face of business.
5. Interviews- Hear from others that are on their lean journey and learn their secrets to success!

Learn more about American Lean at www.americanlean.com
Tom Reed can be reached at tom@americanlean.com

American Lean Weekday: Leadership | Lean Culture & Intrapreneurship | Lean Methods | Industry 4.0 | Case Studies Tom Reed: Lean Enthusiast & President of American Lean

    • Management
    • 5.0, 3 Ratings

Start each workday with digestible nuggets on the benefits of running a lean organization. We cover 5 topics in 5 days in about 5 minutes.

1. Leadership- Discover key concepts for successfully leading your organization during its lean transformation.
2. Culture/Intrapreneurship- Learn how to support your intrapreneurs, those who are driving change within your organization.
3. Lean Topics- Still catching on to lean principles and methodologies? We’ll help you with the basics and advanced topics.
4. Industry 4.0- Learn how smart manufacturing, smart factories, the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), and more will change the face of business.
5. Interviews- Hear from others that are on their lean journey and learn their secrets to success!

Learn more about American Lean at www.americanlean.com
Tom Reed can be reached at tom@americanlean.com

    Level Three Leadership in Lean

    Level Three Leadership in Lean

    Level Three Leadership – Production: Making Things Happen Separates Real Leaders  For the past few weeks, this blog has been reviewing “The Five Levels of Leadership” by John Maxwell and how those levels relate to lean leadership. This week’s blog will discuss Level 3: Production.


    The 5 Levels are like a staircase – all the higher levels rest on the lower ones. Every leader must pass through every level to get to the next one. For example, Level 2 builds on Level 1. You cannot be a Level 3 leader until you’ve mastered Level 2. But once you’ve built a relationship with your people, you’re ready to focus on producing results.


    The Production level is where leadership takes off and advances to another level. Production qualifies and separates true leaders from people who merely occupy leadership positions. Good leaders always make things happen. They get results. They can, and usually do, make a significant impact on an organization. Not only are they productive individually, but their teams are productive. This ability gives Level three leaders confidence, credibility, and increased influence.


    Good leaders know their team. Great leaders leverage the talents of their team to accomplish goals. Level three is about creating a winning team. As Peter Drucker—considered to be the person who invented management and the foundations of modern business—said, “There are two types of people in the business community; those who produce results, and those who give you reasons they didn’t.”


    Lean leadership is defined by the ability to empower and enable people. It revolves around the concept of helping people achieve professional and personal growth allowing them to take pride in both themselves and their work. As a Level three leader, you have built trust and respect at Level 2, and, as a result, others will follow you. This kind of leadership promotes the development of a continuous improvement culture in an organization, through worker interaction, decision-making, and communication.


    Using a skills matrix will help you discover the skills and talents of your team and ensure you are using them to further the vision of the organization. A skills matrix considers five levels of capability:


    I don’t know how to do something


    I can do it generally


    I can do it well


    I am certified as capable of doing it


    I can teach others to do it.


    It is the role of the leader to use a skills matrix to determine the key processes, who need training in what areas, and who is best able to teach those skills. Once there is clarity, the leader can coach the members of the group to facilitate skills development.


    See the blog for the skills matrix


    No one can fake Level three leadership. Either you’re producing for the organization and adding to its bottom line or you’re not. Thomas Watson, the founder of IBM, noted, “The outstanding leaders of every age are those who set their quotas and constantly exceed them.” That is a good description of Level three leaders. They are self-motivated and productive. As a result, they create momentum and develop an environment of success, which makes the team better and stronger.


    Some people never move from Level 2 Permission to Level 3 Production. Why? They can’t produce results. When that is the case, it’s usually because they lack the self-discipline, work ethic, or organization skills to be productive. If you want to go to higher levels of leadership, you have to produce. There is no other way around it.


    Leadership Assessment1Read the following ten statements and place a checkmark next to each one that you agree is true for you. Answer using your first instinct. Please do not skip questions, and do not go back and change any of your responses.


    I consistently hit targets and goals in my work.


    Good people always want to work with me and my team.


    People see

    • 6 min
    Learn what this Essential Business is Doing to Keep Employees Safe

    Learn what this Essential Business is Doing to Keep Employees Safe

    One of the key elements on my American Lean Weekday podcast are the weekly interviews that I conduct with companies on their Lean Journey. These companies are from various industries and are all different sizes. I have interviewed leaders from family-owned businesses to multi-national organizations. This podcast can be found here (http://www.americanlean.com/podcast) . It is episode sixty-seven of the American Lean Weekday podcast


    KV Engineering (http://www.kvengineering.com) is a machine shop located in Santa Ana, California and primarily supports the Aerospace and Defense industry. Established in 1984 starting with one manual mill in a garage, they have grown into a 22,000 square foot facility with 60 employees and thirty machines. They have machining, sheet metal and assembly under one roof.


    These are some key points taken from my interview with the President of KV Engineering, Christie Vu.


    1.  We are having the janitors wipe down door knobs, light fixtures and machines three times a day.


    2. “We are taking employees temperatures when they come to work. Everyone has to wear a mask for protection.”


    3.  We are limiting visitors into the building. They have to fill out a COVID form and we also take their temperatures.


    4. “Unfortunately, we have closed the lunch area to keep people from gathering for lunch. They have to eat outside or in their cars.”


    5. “We have added a third shift to spread out the employees.”


    6. “We are enabling many of the office employees to work from home.”


    As always, it is an honor to serve you and I hope that you and your company are getting better every day!


    Rate and Review Here (http://getpodcast.reviews/id/1499224100)


    More show notes are here (https://americanlean.com/blog/learn-what-this-essential-business-is-doing-to-keep-employees-safe/)


    Buy (https://www.amazon.com/dp/1645162818) the Lean Game Plan


    Follow me on Linked In (https://my.captivate.fm/www.linkedin.com/in/tomreedamericanlean)

    • 5 min
    Additive Manufacturing in Industry 4.0

    Additive Manufacturing in Industry 4.0

    Additive manufacturing (AM) or 3D printing is alreay being used in many people's homes. Did you know there were 7 types of AM? Learn more in this blog.

    • 6 min
    Developing Future State Value Stream Maps

    Developing Future State Value Stream Maps

    After you develop a current state VSM's, it is important to develop a future state value stream map to work toward. Learn how to do that here!

    • 4 min
    Three Tips to Help Your Team Make Good Decisions

    Three Tips to Help Your Team Make Good Decisions

    Here are three tips that you can use to help your teams make good decisions. Keep these in mind during your improvement activities for success!

    • 4 min
    Level Two Leadership in Lean

    Level Two Leadership in Lean

    Level Two Leadership – Permission – You Can’t Lead People Until You Like People 


    John Maxwell, in his book “The 5 Levels of Leadership” writes that this leadership level is about the human relationships that the leader has built up around him. Making the shift from Level 1 leadership -Position to Level 2 leadership- Permission is a person’s first real step into leadership.


    Leadership is influence, and when a leader learns to function on the Permission level, everything changes. This is where people do more than merely comply with orders. They start to follow. And they do so because they want to, not because they have to. Why? Because the leader influences people with relationships, not just position.


    Building relationships develop a foundation for effectively leading others. It also breaks down organizational silos as people connect across the lines between their job descriptions or departments. The more barriers come down and relationships deepen, the broader the foundation for leading others becomes.


    As a Level 2 leader, team management and team-building skills are skills that must be mastered. The most fundamental team management skill managers must master is the motivation of their team and their team members. You cannot accomplish your goals as a manager or team leader unless your team is motivated to perform, produce, and to deliver the results needed.


    Motivating each of the individuals on your team requires recognition by the manager or team leader that each team member’s motivation needs are different and that the primary source of their motivation comes from within the individual. And motivating the team requires a different approach from motivating the team members.


    Within lean management, teamwork is a further aspect of engaging individuals by getting them to build strong relationships across process steps, staff functions, and with suppliers. As Dr. Ishikawa once famously noted: the coworkers in the next step of the process are not our enemies, they are our customers.


    Motivation is relevant to lean because it's motivation through engagement. The article, (https://www.lean.org/balle/DisplayObject.cfm?o=1414) , by Michael Bale’, lists three key dimensions of motivation in a lean management system: autonomy, mastery, and purpose.


    Autonomy recognizes the need for individuals to have some control over what they do when they do it, who they do it with, and how they do it. The Andon system, for example, gives a very large amount of control to the individual worker over the entire chain. This is an essential part of lean management which requires careful nurturing and constant leadership to develop as it should.


    Mastery is about the drive to become better at what we do. Most of our organizations emphasize compliance over competence, an approach that kills engagement and kaizen every time. Mastery is about seeing your abilities not as finite but as infinitely improvable. This is the core of the kaizen spirit and this what people find so rewarding in kaizen when it is encouraged.


    Purpose is a strong need in most of us: we want to take part in something bigger, more enduring than our day-to-day. A key aspect of respect is to work hard at sharing the objectives of the company with every employee so they understand the larger picture.


    When people feel liked, cared for, included, valued, and trusted, they begin to work together with their leader and each other. And that can change the entire working environment. The old saying is true: people go along with leaders they get along with. You can like people without leading them, but you cannot lead people well without liking them. That’s what Level 2 is all about.


    Leadership Assessment1Read the following ten statements and place a checkmark next to each one you agree is true for you. Answer using your first instinct. Please do not ski

    • 6 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
3 Ratings

3 Ratings

fbentzz ,

Great idea!

Really useful idea - made even better with great content. Thanks Tom! Well done

Merman66 ,

American Lean

As a Six Sigma Black Belt I’m impressed with the short and simplistic approach Tom uses. Looking forward to more content.

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