164 episodes

This weekly story-based show takes you behind the events, people, and nature that have shaped our National Parks, and the 421 units managed by the National Park Service.

America's National Parks Podcast RV Miles Network

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.8 • 639 Ratings

This weekly story-based show takes you behind the events, people, and nature that have shaped our National Parks, and the 421 units managed by the National Park Service.

    Restore Hetch Hetchy

    Restore Hetch Hetchy

    It might not be common knowledge that the Yosemite Valley one of the crown jewels of the American landscape, known for towering natural splendor in its pristine condition, has a sister valley, within the National Park, that was flooded to create a water reservoir for the city of San Fransisco. 
    For over 100 years, Hetch Hetchy canyon, named with an indigenous word for a type of wild grass, has been called Hetch Hetchy Reservoir. And while turning back is a real possibility one day, Hetch Hetchy is still an amazing place to visit. Or it would be if it were a little easier. 
    Restore Hetch Hetchy is an organization with a plan to do just that, and Executive Director Spreck Rosekrans is our guest today on the America's National Parks Podcast.

    Driverless Shuttles, Murder in Hot Springs, Pike Trail | National Park News

    Driverless Shuttles, Murder in Hot Springs, Pike Trail | National Park News

    Driverless National Park Shuttles are being tested, a new national trail is proposed, a homicide at Hot Springs, and more.  It’s time for this month’s news round-up episode of the America’s National Parks podcast.

    Kalaupapa

    Kalaupapa

    In the late 1800s, Hansen’s disease (also known as leprosy) was reaching epidemic proportions in the Hawaiian islands. Bacteria cause nerve damage in patients and can lead to crippling of the hands and feet, paralysis, and blindness. At the time, there was no cure and no known effective treatment, and health officials had no idea how the disease was spreading. This frightened officials in Hawaii, and in a desperate act to save their native populations, isolation seemed to be the only answer.

    National Parks That Need Entry Tickets or Reservations for Summer 2021

    National Parks That Need Entry Tickets or Reservations for Summer 2021

    Some National Parks will require entry reservations this summer — in this episode, we'll tell you which ones, and break down all the details.

    The Day it Rained Rocks

    The Day it Rained Rocks

    It was, literally, earth-shaking; so much so that a seismometer thousands of miles away picked up the vibrations. It contained enough force to push debris a mile under water, heaving it uphill onto the opposite shore, and generate a tsunami high enough to rival Seattle’s Space Needle.
    But this was no earthquake.
    Today on America's National Parks, they Icy Bay Landslide, a 60-second deluge of boulders, earth, and trees in a remote slice of Alaska’s Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve on October 17, 2015.

    Protecting Alaska for Generations to Come

    Protecting Alaska for Generations to Come

    One of the most significant land conservation measures in our nation’s history was an act that protected over 100 million acres of land, doubled the size of the country’s national refuge system, and tripled wilderness areas. It created or expanded nine national parks and preserves, six national monuments, sixteen national wildlife refuges, twenty-five wild and scenic rivers, and two national forests, including our nation’s largest: the Tongass in Southeast Alaska. This legislation also created a compromise between the needs of development and conservation and the competing interests that fought for them. While it was not perfect, it has shaped the history of our public lands and the National Park Service system itself.
    This week on America’s National Park: the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act, or ANILCA. 

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
639 Ratings

639 Ratings

potable (usually) ,

Required Listening

I don’t know where they find all these amazing stories about America and the National Parks, but every single one is required listening. You just don’t know what you’re missing.

Cap68 ,

Great show

I taught America history for 20 years. You nailed it on your Bunker Hill story! Well done and keep up the great work!

euphnut18 ,

Great stories and History

This podcast is great for people who want to learn a little about the history of the National Parks, even if you don’t have the chance to visit them yet. The short format makes it a great listen while doing chores, driving to work, or taking a quick escape from the grind.

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