30 episodes

ANAM is dedicated to the training of the most exceptional young classical musicians from Australia and New Zealand. It is a place in which young musicians fulfil their potential as music leaders, distinguished by their skill, imagination and courage, and by their determined contribution to a vibrant music culture.

ANAM Musicians share the stage with the world’s finest artists, performing in over 180 concerts and events in venues across Australia. Alumni work in orchestras and chamber ensembles around the world, performing as soloists, contributing to educating the next generation of musicians, and winning major national and international awards.

ANAM Radio Australian National Academy of Music

    • Music

ANAM is dedicated to the training of the most exceptional young classical musicians from Australia and New Zealand. It is a place in which young musicians fulfil their potential as music leaders, distinguished by their skill, imagination and courage, and by their determined contribution to a vibrant music culture.

ANAM Musicians share the stage with the world’s finest artists, performing in over 180 concerts and events in venues across Australia. Alumni work in orchestras and chamber ensembles around the world, performing as soloists, contributing to educating the next generation of musicians, and winning major national and international awards.

    Bottesini's Double Bass Concerto (Ep 14 2020)

    Bottesini's Double Bass Concerto (Ep 14 2020)

    Episode 14, 2020: Bottesini’s Double Bass Concerto
    Wednesday 21 October 2020

    Giovanni Bottesini is considered to be one of the most colourful and mysterious celebrities of 19thcentury music. Although his Double Bass Concerto no. 2 is considered to be a staple in every double bassist’s repertoire, there is unfortunately no surviving orchestral score written in the composer’s hand. Bottesini’s lack of due diligence in preserving his manuscripts made him more interesting for modern bass players who continuously search for the missing compositions in the back streets of Italy.

    In this episode of ANAM Radio, ANAM alumnus Alexander Arai-Swale (double bass 2017) talks to Phil Lambert (ANAM Music Librarian) from Berlin, Germany where he gives his two cents on the mysterious world of the double bass, and shares interesting anecdotes of Bottesini’s time in Baden-Baden, Germany. Alexander is currently a scholarship holder at the Karajan Academy of the Berliner Philharmoniker under the tutelage of Matthew MacDonald.

    The performance recording featured in this episode is from Alexander’s ANAM recital in 2016. To watch Alexander's full performance visit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x7M3OYvx5zo&feature=youtu.be

    • 12 min
    Finnissy's Ru Tchou (The Ascent of the Sun) (Ep 13 2020)

    Finnissy's Ru Tchou (The Ascent of the Sun) (Ep 13 2020)

    Episode 13, 2020: Finnissy’s Ru Tchou (The Ascent of the Sun)
    Wednesday 7 October 2020

    A virtuoso pianist himself, British composer Michael Finnissy has been at the forefront of new music for the last fifty years. He composed Ru Tchou in 1975 for a concert series in Taiwan and intended it to be a musical ritual for welcoming the sunrise. A Canadian colleague advised him on taking advantage of “a small setup but using it thoroughly”. Earlier this year, Finnissy was able to watch ANAM percussionist Alexander Meagher’s performance of his composition and was thoroughly impressed by how Alex interpreted the piece.

    In this special episode of ANAM Radio, Phil Lambert (ANAM Music Librarian) chats with Michael Finnissy and Alex Meagher about Ru Tchou and the proportions of sound and non-sound that requires the player to perform it like a dance. Finnissy talks about how Alex gave a performance reminiscent of a stylised modern dance – something that is not only meant to be listened to, but also to be watched, a skill Alex credits to his early training in Karate.

    The performance you are about to see is from Alex’s 2019 ANAM Recital. To watch the performance recording, visit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cKjeLH0yGwc&feature=youtu.be

    • 11 min
    de Falla's Concerto for Harpsichord (Ep 12 2020)

    de Falla's Concerto for Harpsichord (Ep 12 2020)

    Episode 12, 2020: de Falla’s Concerto for Harpsichord
    Wednesday 23 September 2020

    When pianist Wanda Landowska asked composer Manuel de Falla to write a composition inspired by Baroque music, she envisioned the piece to be played on a harpsichord. To this end, Landowska also commissioned the French firm Pleyel to build the instrument for her which they indulged with four 7-and-a-half feet long harpsichords made up of metal frames more powerful than any harpsichord known to JS Bach. Although it took him three years to complete, de Falla, a devout Catholic, was able to translate his love for rituals and sacraments into his music. In the second movement of the composition, one can hear solemn plainchants and the clanging of cathedral bells in the bass notes of the cathedral which were inspired by the yearly Corpus Christi procession the composer witnessed in Seville, Spain in 1922.

    Even without the magnificent harpsichords that the composition was first performed on, ANAM Associate Artist Peter de Jager was still able to give justice to the composition when he performed it with fellow ANAM musicians in 2014. Both Peter and Phil Lambert (ANAM Music Librarian) agree that de Falla envisioned this piece with big sonorous sounds, so suitable amplification of the harpsichord is needed for its sound to match the rest of the ensemble. In this ANAM Radio episode, Peter further talks about how de Falla was able to come up with a composition of great strength that seems to look beyond the instrument.

    The performance featured here is from ANAM alumna Jessica Foot’s fellowship concert in 2014. Watch the video recording at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a-cb5tIip04&feature=youtu.be

    • 9 min
    Vivaldi's The Four Seasons(Ep 11 2020)

    Vivaldi's The Four Seasons(Ep 11 2020)

    Episode 11, 2020: Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons
    Wednesday 9 September 2020

    It was in 1725 in the city of Amsterdam when Venetian virtuoso and composer, Antonio Vivaldi’s Il cimento dell’armonia e inventione or The Contest between harmony and invention was published. The composition was made up of twelve sets of concertos for violin, strings and continuo. Its first four concertos, dedicated to a particular season quickly became popular and have since become known as The Four Seasons, a division from the whole Vivaldi did not foresee. The Four Seasons disappeared in the concerto circles after Vivaldi’s death only to resurface in 1948 after a recording of it by Louis Kaufmann. Today it is considered one of the most recorded works of all time, with over 400 versions by different musicians.

    One of the most interesting features about this Vivaldi composition are the introductory sonnets for each concerto believed to be written by Vivaldi himself. ANAM violinist Harry Ward thought that each sonnet helps set the scene for each concerto and decided to have one person from the orchestra read the sonnet that accompanies each concerto when he performed and directed The Four Seasons with fellow ANAM Musicians last year. In this week’s episode of ANAM Radio, Harry and Phil Lambert (ANAM Music Librarian) chat about remarkable musical details of this classic masterpiece.

    The Four Seasons performance featured in this episode is from Harry’s recital concert at ANAM in 2019 with ANAM strings and Peter de Jager. Harry was recently recognised as one of Musica Viva’s FutureMakers.

    Watch the full performance recording athttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OM2FYe5jcss&feature=youtu.be

    • 10 min
    Chopin's Barcarolle (Ep 10 2020)

    Chopin's Barcarolle (Ep 10 2020)

    Episode 10, 2020: Chopin’s Barcarolle
    Wednesday 19 August 2020

    It is surprising to know that Frédéric François Chopin wrote the Barcarolle without having had the chance to visit Venice during his lifetime. A barcarolle is a Venetian gondolier's song, and Chopin wrote his in 1845. ANAM Alumnus Adam McMillan (piano 2017) tells ANAM Music Librarian Phil Lambert about Chopin’s love for the opera as a possible inspiration for this composition as some of the arias written around that time were written in the Barcarolle style.

    In this episode, you will also hear Adam talk about how performing this piece feels like being “in a dream the whole time.” The recording featured on this episode is from Adam’s ANAM Recital in 2017. Watch out for Phil’s favourite moment of suspense that begins about 6:51 into the video that he calls a good “moment of suspense.”

    Watch the full performance at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ALs_LlGkKSA&feature=youtu.be

    • 7 min
    Mozart's Six German Dance (Ep 9 2020)

    Mozart's Six German Dance (Ep 9 2020)

    Episode 9, 2020: Mozart’s Six German Dances
    Wednesday 12 August 2020

    This week we revisit Mozart’s first time in Prague in 1787 where he wrote the first of his ten sets of German Dances. But first, Phil Lambert (ANAM Music Librarian) clarifies that the music in the elegant ballroom scenes in film adaptations of Jane Austen’s novels where couples dance and change partners is not a German dance. On the contrary, in a German dance each dancer only has one partner – no sharing.

    In this episode Phil and ANAM alumnus Nicholas Young (piano 2017) chat about how Mozart, who was known as a procrastinator, wrote this piece in a spur of the moment to celebrate his final few days in Prague during his first visit. Phil calls it a dance track; a musical composition to get up and dance to. Nicholas also shares how the piece’s lack of tempo markings gave him the freedom to experiment with it to bring delightful music to his audience.

    The performance featured on this episode is from a 2017 ANAM Soundbite concert.

    • 8 min

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