32 episodes

Anamnesis is a podcast from MedPage Today where health professionals share stories reveling in intangible lessons beyond EMRs and ICD codes. We honor and highlight the humanity and soul of caring for people -- patients and one another. Each episode features 2 or 3 physicians who share their stories around a particular theme with musical interludes from musician doctors and clinicians. In-between-isodes feature reports from recent medical conferences about stories shared there and a brief rundown of top studies and developments.

Anamnesis: Medical Storytellers | from MedPage Today MedPage Today

    • Science
    • 4.8 • 74 Ratings

Anamnesis is a podcast from MedPage Today where health professionals share stories reveling in intangible lessons beyond EMRs and ICD codes. We honor and highlight the humanity and soul of caring for people -- patients and one another. Each episode features 2 or 3 physicians who share their stories around a particular theme with musical interludes from musician doctors and clinicians. In-between-isodes feature reports from recent medical conferences about stories shared there and a brief rundown of top studies and developments.

    A Nurse. A Pandemic. An Addiction.

    A Nurse. A Pandemic. An Addiction.

    Over the holidays, a nurse in recovery from opioid use disorder struggled to keep her addiction in check. She was caring for coronavirus patients on the front lines in an ICU outside Seattle. She asked her hospital for more support, and received little. She reached out to her family, but that just made things worse. On Sunday, January 3, 2021, Tiffany Swedeen relapsed.

    Tiffany's story highlights the fact that when it comes to substance use disorders, our healthcare system has one standard for patients and another for nurses. And while nurses have responsibilities not only to themselves, but to the public, it's worth remembering that substance use disorder is still a chronic but treatable brain disease, and not a moral failing.
    This episode of Anamnesis features discussions of drug abuse and suicide that may be disturbing to some listeners. Discretion is advised.

    Chapter 1. Blacked Out on Fentanyl for a Day (2:40) -- A nurse in recovery shares one of her loneliest moments.

    Chapter 2. Job, License, and Livelihood on the Line (11:09) -- After diverting drugs, the foundation begins to crack for this nurse.

    Chapter 3. Nurses Are Not Unbreakable (26:20) -- We as a society need to serve nurses better.

    Episode produced by Shannon Firth
    Special thanks to Crystal Phend
    Sound engineering by Emily Hutto
    Theme music by Palomar

    • 40 min
    Scar Tissue: Emotional Vulnerability in Clinical Practice

    Scar Tissue: Emotional Vulnerability in Clinical Practice

    Our theme this month is "Scar Tissue."

    And I don’t mean the surgical scar tissue, the ones from the fall we took ice skating when we were 6, or the ones we give patients when we take out their appendixes or sew up their lacerations — this is about the emotional vulnerability that we all have in clinical practice — and that accepting what we feel is the first step in healing.

    Now, this is a hard one for us as clinicians. We all fancy ourselves healers — but don’t always like to acknowledge that in the process, we need healing ourselves. Because the burdens we elicit from our patients, we often shoulder ourselves — whether subconsciously, or in empathy — and those burdens can chip at us, like they do any human.

    But that’s what we are — human.

    Chapter 1. I Can't Do This Again (3:28) -- A physician reaches his limit. Story by Taison Bell, MD.

    Chapter 2. When the Patient Becomes the Healer (16:17) -- A doctor finds hope from an unexpected place. Story by Ashanda Saint Jean, MD.

    Chapter 3. It Is Not a Sin to Cry (29:09) -- How being a good doctor is being human. Story by Hannah Brooks, MD.

    Episode produced by Genevieve Friedman
    Hosted by Amy Ho, MD
    Sound engineering by Greg Laub
    Theme music by Palomar

    • 41 min
    Heal Thyself: When Work Hits Home

    Heal Thyself: When Work Hits Home

    What happens when you become the patient? That's what we're here to explore today -- with this episode's theme: Heal Thyself.

    Think about it. We diagnose and often intervene with medicines, surgeries, treatments. These interventions generally temporize and support the body, so that the body can heal itself.

    The concept of "healing" thyself, then, really does often have to accept that modern medicine can't do the healing. Sometimes we have to do it ourselves.

    And sometimes that's more mind than matter.

    Today, we have three incredible stories for you -- by three different doctors, of three different specialties, who all share a story of how they "Healed Thyself" of a disease in their very area of expertise.

    Chapter 1. Researcher Turned COVID Long-Hauler (3:04) -- A story of knowledge and recovery. Story by Paul Garner, MD.

    Chapter 2. I'm a Neurologist With Alzheimer's (15:52) -- How knowledge helped one doctor's uncertainty. Story by Daniel Gibbs, MD, PhD.

    Chapter 3. Prayer's Place in Treatment (25:50) -- "Dr. Hope" credits his remission, in part, to tens of thousands of strangers. Story by Gary Onik, MD.

    Episode produced by Judy George
    Hosted by Amy Ho, MD
    Sound engineering by Greg Laub
    Theme music by Palomar

    • 37 min
    Resilience: Being Tough in Tough Times

    Resilience: Being Tough in Tough Times

    Resilience is a core necessity in medicine. Resilience is toughness. Resilience is tenacity. Resilience is recovering and coming back for more.

    You need resilience to survive the long education and training for nearly every role in medicine. And as a patient, you need resilience to just make it through not only your acute care but the often weeks, months, or years of healing that happen afterward.

    Day in and day out, we call on our own resilience to get through difficult situations, tragic experiences, and more — so that we can keep doing what we do best.

    Resilience is a core necessity in medicine. Resilience is toughness. Resilience is tenacity. Resilience is recovering and coming back for more.

    You need resilience to survive the long education and training for nearly every role in medicine. And as a patient, you need resilience to just make it through not only your acute care but the often weeks, months, or years of healing that happen afterward.

    Day in and day out, we call on our own resilience to get through difficult situations, tragic experiences, and more — so that we can keep doing what we do best.

    Chapter 1. From Tragedy to Advocacy (3:00) — When the worst happened to his son, one father took the opportunity to help others. Story by Martin McNair.

    Chapter 2. Balancing Medicine and Country Music Stardom (17:00) — How one doctor’s story of following a passion turned out a few hits. Story by James Robert Webb, MD.

    Chapter 3. The Power of Social Media (32:22) — This doctor discovered a better way to communicate health information. Story by Austin Chiang, MD, MPH.

    Episode produced by Ryan Basen
    Hosted by Amy Ho, MD
    Sound engineering by Greg Laub
    Theme music by Palomar

    • 45 min
    Winning in Medicine: Victories Large and Small

    Winning in Medicine: Victories Large and Small

    This has been a bit of a tough summer for everyone in healthcare. Our worlds have been a bit topsy-turvy, to say the least.

    That makes this all the more important of a time to remember to celebrate wins, of all sizes. Times are tough, remember every day of our lives is still riddled with victories.
    Some are small — a patient who listened to your advice, a colleague who thought you were right, even the warm blanket you brought to a patient that cheered up their day a little bit. Some are big — a literal life saved, a life changed, sometimes even an entire community improved.
    Our impact as healthcare professionals is incredible, now more than ever. We influence our patients, our families, our communities and get an amazing opportunity to be listened to and respected so that we can expand our impact even more.

    Chapter 1. Early in COVID: A Win and a White House Call (2:47) -- Years of work led to wins during a difficult time. Story by Brian Garibaldi, MD.

    Chapter 2. Breaking Down Patients' Barriers (16:04) -- A doctor helps a reluctant patient thrive. Story by Fred Pelzman, MD.

    Chapter 3. A Victory for Cancer Prevention (27:21) -- A tale of engaging, educating, and advocating for patients. Story by Len Lichtenfeld, MD.

    • 40 min
    Empathy: The Most Critical Skill in Medicine

    Empathy: The Most Critical Skill in Medicine

    There are few things more core to the pillars of medicine than the concept of "empathy." Now empathy is something we hear about from day one in medical school, nursing school, or PA school. Hey, it's even something we hear in pre-med! It's probably something we even wrote about in our admissions essays. And that's because empathy is a critical part of care. You cannot care for a patient if you cannot relate, commiserate, and feel with them. In this episode, three storytellers have their own stories of empathy, all with a different spin on how it came out to them.

    Chapter 1. 'Can You Explain Why You're Sending Me to the ICU?' (2:57): Doctor-turned-patient reflects on empathy in medicine after the harrowing birth of her child. Story by Lauren Rissman, MD.
    Chapter 2. It Isn't the Dead Child Who Haunts Me (21:31): A doctor is reminded of an intern's reaction often. Story by Maryanne Chrisant, MD.
    Chapter 3. Treating Cancer Patients 'Like Cattle About to Be Slaughtered' (42:33): What "heartless" oncology in Russia taught this doctor. Story by Vadim Gushchin, MD.
    Episode produced by Amanda D'Ambrosio
    Hosted by Amy Ho, MD
    Sound engineering by Greg Laub
    Theme music by Palomar

    • 55 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
74 Ratings

74 Ratings

Scubadoc16 ,

excellent podcast

Thank you so much for doing this podcast. It helps me be a better doctor and feel connected to others in my "tribe" of healers.

Nikki, NP ,

Mid level provider

I enjoy this podcast. However, it’s quite offensive and archaic to call NPs “mid levels”. Please do better.

AnotherBurntOutDoc ,

Therapeutic!

I wish I had found this or something similar, before I completely burned out and stopped seeing patients. I still would have changed my career role ( I now have a purely administrative role, which I love.). But I believe this type of podcast would have helped with my understanding of these types of aspects in medicine. So nice to hear physicians discuss struggles, fears, as well as victories, and how patients actually impact the doctor personally. Keep up the excellent work!

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