89 episodes

Anesthesia Guidebook is the go-to guide for providers who want to master their craft. We help anesthesia providers thrive in challenging, high-stakes careers through our relevant, compelling guides. You’re on a path to becoming a master anesthesia provider. We’re your go-to guide for deepening your anesthesia practice.

Anesthesia Guidebook Jon Lowrance

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.8 • 143 Ratings

Anesthesia Guidebook is the go-to guide for providers who want to master their craft. We help anesthesia providers thrive in challenging, high-stakes careers through our relevant, compelling guides. You’re on a path to becoming a master anesthesia provider. We’re your go-to guide for deepening your anesthesia practice.

    #89 – Distraction in the OR with Heather Turcotte, DO

    #89 – Distraction in the OR with Heather Turcotte, DO

    What’s up y’all this is Jon Lowrance and this is episode 89 – Distraction in the OR with Heather Turcotte, DO. Y’all, I am so stoked to bring you this conversation… I caught up with Dr Turcotte earlier this summer as she was finishing her residency in anesthesia and I’m pumped to finally get this out to you in early September of 2022. This topic was the focus of her residency project and senior grand rounds presentation and it definitely created a stir in our group as CRNAs, physicians, residents & SRNAs grappled with how to appropriately use cell phones and other technology in their practices.







    Since it’s late summer, early fall… I gotta give a shout out to all the residents & SRNAs out there who graduated this summer. It’s always fun to see yall wrap up clinicals & residency projects and transition into your new jobs or fellowships.







    I love getting texts & photos from SRNAs of their board results with the word PASS printed in the middle of the page… It’s such an incredible moment that makes all of the hard work worth it. So thanks to all of you who have reached out by email, text & social media recently with your passing boards photos, positive reviews & ratings of the podcasts and questions. This podcast puts me in touch with so many amazing people… I’ve recently heard from experienced providers to newly minted CRNAs on the day they pass boards, to brand new CA1’s to ICU nurses who found the podcast and are on the path to becoming anesthesia providers. Wherever you are in your own journey, my hope is that Anesthesia Guidebook will be a go-to guide for you as you seek to get your learn on and master your craft.







    Heather Turcotte, DO joins me in this is fascinating conversation that weaves through the considerations around using cell phones in the OR, checking email/internet, music that’s playing, conversations, door swings and other forms of distraction in the operating room.







    Dr Turcotte was born and raised in the great state of Maine. She earned a doctorate in physical therapy and practiced as a physical therapist for 4 years before going back to medical school in 2014 at the University of New England. Dr Turcotte finished her residency in anesthesiology at Maine Medical Center in 2022 and entered into private practice. Outside of medicine, she enjoys spending time with her husband and 3 kids, who are 9, 6, and 1 years old at the time of this recording, going to the beach, and drinking lots of coffee!







    In this conversation, Dr Turcotte brings this discussion to life with a case study where an anesthesia provider settled out of court in a dispute on negligence in a case where the patient experienced hypotension and a PEA arrest, survived the case but died a few days later. The anesthesia provider had used their cell phone and anesthesia station computer to check email and online news stories. Interestingly, an expert anesthesia witness testified that the actions of the anesthesia provider in managing the patient were flawless. But just because the provider had used their cell phone & surfed the internet on the work computer, the legal team advised they settle to avoid a jury verdict on the case.







    Cell phone use, open internet access including email, music playing the OR and so many other forms of distraction are common elements in operating rooms across the United States. Some institutions create policies that limit cell phone use in the OR. Others have policies that are more vague while others have no formal policies around cell phone use in the OR. There’s legitimate considerations for each of these… On one hand, how does a hospital enforce a policy that is very strict?

    • 37 min
    #88 – Combat Trauma Anesthesia with Dustin Degman, MSN, CRNA – Part 3

    #88 – Combat Trauma Anesthesia with Dustin Degman, MSN, CRNA – Part 3

    This is episode 88 and it’s part 3 off a three-part series with Dustin Degman, a CRNA formerly with the United States Army.







    In the first episode, we discussed Dustin’s experience in Afghanistan serving at a forward operating base in Paktika Province in 2012.  We talk about what makes up forward surgical teams and the role of CRNAs as the sole anesthesia provider on these teams.







    In part two, we discussed the principles of damage control resuscitation.







    And in this final episode of the series, we talk about the path to becoming a military CRNA, a little bit more about Dustin’s personal journey and the importance of supporting our troops. Now, I know the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have fortunately come to an official end and that right now in August of 2022 we are in a period of time where United States troops are not in active combat roles. However, the United States still have the world’s largest military with approximately 1.3 million active service members and nearly 200,000 personnel actively deployed oversees. What Degman shares in this episode about how to engage with and support active service personnel is a powerful message for each of us. These individuals continue to make a sacrifice to serve the mission that our nation has given them. That we support them and how we support them matters. And so we’re going to talk a bit about that in this episode. And again, in terms of direct relevance to anesthesia, this episode has incredible traction for those of you who are or want to become military CRNAs or physician anesthesiologists or those of you who work with, are friends with or in families with these individuals.







    This series was originally recorded in early 2015, just a year or so after Dustin had returned from Afghanistan and while the war there was still raging.  At the time, I was completing my anesthesia training at Western Carolina University and working on launching From the Head of the Bed… the podcast the preceded Anesthesia Guidebook.  Dustin was one of my professors and clinical faculty at WCU and was kind enough to volunteer his time for these interviews back then.  The reason I’m bringing them forward here is that they’re chock full of wildly fantastic details on the experience of a forward-deployed military anesthesia provider and the principles of trauma anesthesia, which are absolutely relevant today.







    Dustin served with the Unites States Air Force from 1998 – 2002 as a critical care Registered Nurse.  He was honorably discharged and went on to complete his anesthesia training outside of the military.  In 2010, he re-enlisted with the Army Reserves as a CRNA and was deployed in November 2012 to Forward Operating Base Orgun-E in Paktika Province, Afghanistan where he was the sole anesthesia provider on a forward surgical team providing damage control resuscitation to injured soldiers.  Most recently, Dustin serves as the chief CRNA at PeaceHealth’s Peace Harbor Medical Center in Florence, Oregon.  In 2021, Dustin was awarded the PeaceHealth Mission & Values award and the organization put together an incredible video tribute to Dustin.  Degman is the real deal… he was the real deal a decade ago when he was serving in Paktika Province, Afghanistan, which he talks about in these next 3 episodes and he’s still the real deal as he serves as a CRNA with Peace Harbor Medical Center out on the coast of Oregon.







    I think you’re going to really enjoy hearing from Dustin on combat trauma anesthesia and with that,

    • 27 min
    #87 – Combat Trauma Anesthesia with Dustin Degman, MSN, CRNA – Part 2

    #87 – Combat Trauma Anesthesia with Dustin Degman, MSN, CRNA – Part 2

    What’s up yall this is Jon Lowrance with Anesthesia Guidebook.  I am so pumped to bring you this series of 3 episodes on Combat Trauma Anesthesia!  







    This is episode 87 and it’s part 2 off a three-part series with Dustin Degman, a CRNA formerly with the United States Army.







    In the first episode, we discussed Dustin’s experience in Afghanistan serving at a forward operating base in Paktika Province in 2012 to 2013.  We talk about what makes up forward surgical teams and the role of CRNAs as the sole anesthesia provider on these teams.







    In this part – part two, we discuss the principles of damage control resuscitation in the context of forward surgical bases and combat zones. While this discussion is focused on combat trauma anesthesia, the core underlying principles of damage control resuscitation hold true for civilian trauma centers.







    And then in part three, we’re gonna come back and talk about the path to becoming a military CRNA and the importance of supporting our troops.  







    This series was originally recorded in early 2015, just a year or so after Dustin had returned from Afghanistan and while the war there was still raging.  At the time, I was completing my anesthesia training at Western Carolina University and working on launching From the Head of the Bed… the podcast the preceded Anesthesia Guidebook.  Dustin was one of my professors and clinical faculty at WCU and was kind enough to volunteer his time for these interviews back then.  The reason I’m bringing them forward here is that they’re chock full of wildly fantastic details on the experience of a forward-deployed military anesthesia provider and the principles of trauma anesthesia, which are absolutely relevant today.







    Dustin served with the Unites States Air Force from 1998 – 2002 as a critical care Registered Nurse.  He was honorably discharged and went on to complete his anesthesia training outside of the military.  In 2010, he re-enlisted with the Army Reserves as a CRNA and was deployed in November 2012 to Forward Operating Base Orgun-E in Paktika Province, Afghanistan where he was the sole anesthesia provider on a forward surgical team providing damage control resuscitation to injured soldiers.  Most recently, Dustin serves as the chief CRNA at PeaceHealth’s Peace Harbor Medical Center in Florence, Oregon.  In 2021, Dustin was awarded the PeaceHealth Mission & Values award and the organization put together an incredible video tribute to Dustin.  Degman is the real deal… he was the real deal a decade ago when he was serving in Paktika Province, Afghanistan, which he talks about in these next 3 episodes and he’s still the real deal as he serves as a CRNA with Peace Harbor Medical Center out on the coast of Oregon.







    I think you’re going to really enjoy hearing from Dustin on combat trauma anesthesia and with that, let’s get to the show!







    To close each of these 3 episodes out, I’d like to encourage you to make a donation to the Pat Tillman Foundation in honor of Army Ranger Pat Tillman who was killed in Afghanistan in 2004.  The Pat Tillman Foundation awards academic scholarships to military service members, veterans and their spouses.  Dustin Degman identified this as one of the several service organizations that he believes in and encourages you to give to either the Pat Tillman Foundation or an organization ...

    • 39 min
    #86 – Combat Trauma Anesthesia with Dustin Degman, MSN, CRNA – Part 1

    #86 – Combat Trauma Anesthesia with Dustin Degman, MSN, CRNA – Part 1

    What’s up yall this is Jon Lowrance with Anesthesia Guidebook.  I am so pumped to bring you this next series of 3 episodes!  







    This is episode 86 and it kicks off a three-part series with Dustin Degman, a CRNA formerly with the United States Army on combat trauma anesthesia.  







    In this first episode, we discuss Dustin’s experience in Afghanistan serving at a forward operating base in Paktika Province in 2012 to 2013.  We talk about what makes up forward surgical teams and the role of CRNAs as the sole anesthesia provider on these teams.







    In part two, we discuss the principles of damage control resuscitation and the context of operating in a combat zone.







    In part three, we talk about the path to becoming a military CRNA and the importance of support our troops.  







    This series was originally recorded in early 2015, just a year or so after Dustin had returned from Afghanistan and while the war there was still raging.  At the time, I was completing my anesthesia training at Western Carolina University and working on launching From the Head of the Bed… the podcast the preceded Anesthesia Guidebook.  Dustin was one of my professors and clinical faculty at WCU and was kind enough to volunteer his time for these interviews back then.  The reason I’m bringing them forward here is that they’re chock full of wildly fantastic details on the experience of a forward-deployed military anesthesia provider and the principles of trauma anesthesia, which are absolutely relevant today.







    Dustin served with the Unites States Air Force from 1998 – 2002 as a critical care Registered Nurse.  He was honorably discharged and went on to complete his anesthesia training outside of the military.  In 2010, he re-enlisted with the Army Reserves as a CRNA and was deployed in November 2012 to Forward Operating Base Orgun-E in Paktika Province, Afghanistan where he was the sole anesthesia provider on a forward surgical team providing damage control resuscitation to injured soldiers.  Most recently, Dustin serves as the chief CRNA at PeaceHealth’s Peace Harbor Medical Center in Florence, Oregon.  In 2021, Dustin was awarded the PeaceHealth Mission & Values award and the organization put together an incredible video tribute to Dustin.  Degman is the real deal… he was the real deal a decade ago when he was serving in Paktika Province, Afghanistan, which he talks about in these next 3 episodes and he’s still the real deal as he serves as a CRNA with Peace Harbor Medical Center out on the coast of Oregon.







    I think you’re going to really enjoy hearing from Dustin on combat trauma anesthesia and with that, let’s get to the show!







    To close each of these 3 episodes out, I’d like to encourage you to make a donation to the Pat Tillman Foundation in honor of Army Ranger Pat Tillman who was killed in Afghanistan in 2004.  The Pat Tillman Foundation awards academic scholarships to military service members, veterans and their spouses.  Dustin Degman identified this as one of the several service organizations that he believes in and encourages you to give to either the Pat Tillman Foundation or an organization you connect with.  If we each give $10-20, our collective impacts will make a huge difference.







    Resources:





















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    • 29 min
    #85 – The McLott Mix – Part 2 with Jason McLott, MSN, CRNA

    #85 – The McLott Mix – Part 2 with Jason McLott, MSN, CRNA

    Jason McLott, MSN, CRNA developed a mix of medications for doing opioid-free anesthesia that came to be know as the McLott Mix. It’s a combination of dexmedetomidine, lidocaine, ketamine and magnesium.







    Jason is clear that the McLott Mix helps achieve opioid-free anesthesia, not opioid-free analgesia, recognizing the role of opiates, if needed, in post-operative analgesia plans.







    Jason completed his anesthesia training at Oakland University’s Beaumont Nurse Anesthesia program and works in a CRNA-only practice at Blue Ridge Hospital in rural North Carolina. He regularly mentors SRNAs from Western Carolina University, giving them exposure to a CRNA-only practice, extensive regional anesthesia experience and opioid-free anesthesia techniques. Jason also instructs regional anesthesia courses with Twin Oaks Anesthesia.







    If you’ve followed Anesthesia Guidebook for any amount of time, you’ll probably remember that Western Carolina University is my alma mater. I would highly recommend WCU as a premier school for becoming a CRNA. The faculty & clinical sites are top notch and you can’t beat the location down in Asheville, North Carolina.







    In Part 1 of this conversation, we talked about Jason’s background, what led him to get into opioid-free anesthesia and the details of the McLott Mix and how he suggests it be used. In Part 2 of our conversation, we come back to talk in more detail on the nuances of how Jason uses the McLott Mix in his practice and how providers can instigate change in moving their practices and groups towards opioid-free anesthesia. Part 2 is a prime example of what Randy Moore & Desirée Chappell & I talked about in episode 82 on change management in healthcare. Hopefully these 2 shows with Jason McLott get you thinking about real ways that you can build opioid-free techniques into your anesthesia practice.







    Schenkel, L., Vogel Kahmann, I., & Steuer, C. (2022). Opioid-Free Anesthesia: Physico Chemical Stability Studies on Multi-Analyte Mixtures Intended for Use in Clinical Anesthesiology. Hospital pharmacy, 57(2), 246-252.

    • 33 min
    #84 – The McLott Mix – Part 1 with Jason McLott, MSN, CRNA

    #84 – The McLott Mix – Part 1 with Jason McLott, MSN, CRNA

    Jason McLott, MSN, CRNA developed a mix of medications for doing opioid-free anesthesia that came to be know as the McLott Mix. It’s a combination of dexmedetomidine, lidocaine, ketamine and magnesium. In this episode, Mr McLott himself unpacks the story of the mix’s development, efficacy and principles for opioid-free anesthesia. He’s clear that this mix helps achieve opioid-free anesthesia, not opioid-free analgesia, recognizing the role of opiates, if needed, in post-operative analgesia plans.







    Jason completed his anesthesia training at Oakland University’s Beaumont Nurse Anesthesia program and works in a CRNA-only practice at Blue Ridge Hospital in rural North Carolina. He regularly mentors SRNAs from Western Carolina University, giving them exposure to a CRNA-only practice, extensive regional anesthesia experience and opioid-free anesthesia techniques. Jason also instructs regional anesthesia courses with Twin Oaks Anesthesia.







    If you’ve followed Anesthesia Guidebook for any amount of time, you’ll probably remember that Western Carolina University is my alma mater. I would highly recommend WCU as a premier school for becoming a CRNA. The faculty & clinical sites are top notch and you can’t beat the location down in Asheville, North Carolina.







    In Part 1 of this conversation, we talk about Jason’s background, what led him to get into opioid-free anesthesia and the details of the McLott Mix and how he suggests it be used. In Part 2 of our conversation, we come back to talk in more detail on the nuances of how Jason uses the McLott Mix in his practice and how providers can instigate change in moving their practices and groups towards opioid-free anesthesia. Part 2 is a prime example of what Randy Moore & Desirée Chappell & I talked about in episode 82 on change management in healthcare. Hopefully these 2 shows with Jason McLott get you thinking about real ways that you can build opioid-free techniques into your anesthesia practice.







    Schenkel, L., Vogel Kahmann, I., & Steuer, C. (2022). Opioid-Free Anesthesia: Physico Chemical Stability Studies on Multi-Analyte Mixtures Intended for Use in Clinical Anesthesiology. Hospital pharmacy, 57(2), 246-252.

    • 43 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
143 Ratings

143 Ratings

WhitStitz ,

The best

Simply the best anesthesia podcast out there! As a new SRNA I appreciate the topics covered and I always learn something new!

UpcomingSRNAMarkt ,

Awesome content!

I came across to your podcast, and stumbled initially with “from the Head of the Bed”, and continued with your latest channel. Incoming SRNA next year, and I am anxious and excited at the same time. Listening to your podcast has given me a lot of insights as to what I am about to face once I start the program next year. You cover from preparation for school, while doing and after grad school. Your story has inspired me, especially the story when you almost failed out of school and picked up yourself from that, and thrive until you graduate and be a CRNA. Please continue doing this, you inspire a lot of people! 😊 All the best!

HaleynRN ,

Absolutely crucial

Love this podcast. This information is absolutely crucial for anesthesia providers to be familiar with. I’m regards to episodes 17-19, If you are transitioning from an ICU RN to an anesthesia student/provider- it’s important to realize that even though you may have given these medications in the ICU, as an anesthesia provider these are being given in a different scenario and you must consider the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics from a different perspective due to the fact that most patients will need to be able to emerge much quicker and medication choices must be considered on a deep level. I would recommend this entire podcast! 15/10 stars. Thank you for sharing knowledge so we can all continue to put in the work to be better anesthesia providers.

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