48 episodes

Join Shumita Basu and Duarte Geraldino every weekday morning as they guide you through some of the most fascinating stories in the news — and how the world’s best journalists are covering them.

Apple News Today Apple News Editors

    • Daily News
    • 3.5 • 3K Ratings

Join Shumita Basu and Duarte Geraldino every weekday morning as they guide you through some of the most fascinating stories in the news — and how the world’s best journalists are covering them.

    Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s legacy and the Supreme Court’s future

    Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s legacy and the Supreme Court’s future

    Apple News has a collection of the best coverage of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s legacy.

    The Washington Post has the latest on where President Trump stands on nominating the next Supreme Court justice.

    Vox breaks down the possibility of a Senate vote to fill Justice Ginsburg’s seat on the Supreme Court.

    CNN explains recent polling that indicates the opening on the Supreme Court is a more of a motivating election issue for Democrats than Republicans. 

    Politico looks at how Justice Ginsburg’s death will affect some of the key cases on the court's docket this fall.

    For the Atlantic, legal scholar Jeffrey Rosen presents an intimate interview with Justice Ginsburg.

    • 11 min
    Another allegation of sexual assault against President Trump

    Another allegation of sexual assault against President Trump

    The Guardian has exclusive reporting on the latest allegation of sexual assault levied against President Trump. In the Atlantic, E. Jean Carroll is publishing an ongoing series of interviews with fellow accusers of the president. Read the first three installments: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3.

    Vanity Fair reveals Republican congressman Matt Gaetz’s theory of gaining political influence through media appearances. 

    Bloomberg News reports that almost a third of office workers say they never want to go back to the office. Bloomberg News also says many CEOs aren’t so excited about employees working from home.

    Amanda Mull for the Atlantic reveals why so many products have been sold out during the pandemic.

    • 7 min
    Two candidates, two plans to address coronavirus

    Two candidates, two plans to address coronavirus

    Yesterday, the Trump administration announced its plan for vaccine distribution once a vaccine has received FDA authorization. USA Today lays out the plan, while the Washington Post explains how former Joe Biden would address the pandemic if elected president.

    The Intercept reports on whistleblower allegations that immigrant women are being sterilized without their knowledge or consent at an Immigration and Customs Enforcement detention facility in Georgia.

    The Washington Post reveals that more lower-income students are dropping out of college. 

    KCRW explains a recent trend that dentists have noticed during the pandemic: more patients with teeth problems related to grinding and clenching.

    • 7 min
    Climate change report predicts mass migration in the U.S.

    Climate change report predicts mass migration in the U.S.

    For ProPublica and the New York Times Magazine, Abrahm Lustgarten reports that the devastating effects of climate change will cause mass migration in the United States. And ProPublica also uses data to create maps that show how the changing climate will reshape the country.

    In a new investigation, NPR and PBS Frontline find that much of the plastic people think they’re recycling is ending up in landfills.

    Laura Secor for the New Yorker reveals that an Iranian scientist faced a yearslong legal battle after refusing to become an FBI informant.

    The Washington Post brings us a story of a letter delivered by the USPS after being lost in the mail for a hundred years.

    • 8 min
    The historic peace agreement between Israel and the UAE

    The historic peace agreement between Israel and the UAE

    The L.A. Times reports on President Trump’s visit to California and Joe Biden’s remarks about the wildfires in the state. The L.A. Times also explains the connection between climate change and California’s record-breaking wildfires. And MarketWatch outlines where Trump and Biden stand on environmental policy.

    As Israel and the United Arab Emirates sign a peace deal at the White House, NBC News reports that Bahrain will also move toward establishing a diplomatic relationship with Israel. The New Yorker’s Bernard Avishai, who’s been writing about Israeli foreign relations for decades, offers his analysis of the deal. Dennis Ross writes for the Washington Post that the agreement could cause other Arab nations facing crises to see a helpful ally in Israel. And Al Jazeera explains what it all means for Palestine.

    NBC News describes how issues with this year’s census could lead to a major undercount.

    National Geographic breaks down the recent discovery of a possible sign of life on Venus and the resulting debate in the science community.

    And “early voting” or “in-person absentee voting” begins today in six states. If you’re a voter in Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, South Dakota, Wyoming, or Virginia, check out our election guide to see if you can vote early in your county.

    • 8 min
    As wildfires spread in the U.S., so do conspiracy theories

    As wildfires spread in the U.S., so do conspiracy theories

    CNN details recent conspiracy theories — which law enforcement has made clear are untrue — that have emerged about the Oregon wildfires. And for Time magazine, Charlotte Alter spoke to voters across Wisconsin and found that conspiracy theories have become entrenched in the American psyche.

    Bloomberg Businessweek spoke with workers at several companies who say they were told not to discuss COVID-19 workplace cases. The Washington Post reports that after hundreds of meatpacking plants saw outbreaks among their workers, only two plants have been fined. And the Intercept reveals that employees who have gotten sick with the coronavirus are not receiving workers’ compensation.

    California Sunday Magazine breaks down how the vote-by-mail industry works.

    The Atlantic explains why smartphones can’t quite capture the red skies from recent wildfires.

    • 8 min

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5
3K Ratings

3K Ratings

Malcompliant ,

Left bias starting to show

What I like:
(1) Great interesting selection of stories I may not have heard of otherwise.
(2) Under 10 minutes.
(3) No ads.

What I don't like:
Mainstream stories are covered with a left bias. It wasn't so biased when the podcast started.

she who must not me named••• ,

I love it

The news today is so hard for me to sit through. This is a nice dose to keep me informed. I see a lot of ratings saying that it’s left biased, but in today’s world there isn’t a way to show the news without sounding biased. Your party did a bad thing? “That news is biased!”
Overall I thing they’re doing a great job

_thegery ,

Fair and centered. Can’t go wrong with this one.

Don’t believe the comments and haters saying that it’s biased!! Listen for yourself.

They do present a good selection of news from various sources. EVEN FOX News if I’m not mistaken. However, they won’t just present the latest lies and nonsense that Trump says without providing the actual truth. I appreciate this very much, as it saves me time from having to fact-check the news myself. If you think it’s biased or left-leaning, you might just be biased yourself.

I’ve also seen some comments about the music. As someone who’s worked as a musician and in production, I don’t believe the music is too loud or distracting. I think it’s very “newsy” and engaging. The intro grabs your attention and lets you know the show’s about to begin. But then it quiets down to almost nothing, except the occasional synth or basic of underneath the hosts’ voices.

Overall, I am impressed by Apple’s podcast, and I think more people should listen to it for an objective, informative, and concise look at the headlines.

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