170 episodes

Ask Me Anything, hosted by Pastor J.D. Greear, gives quick answers to some of your toughest theological, ethical, and leadership questions. For both mature and new believers alike, Ask Me Anything will help listeners grow in their understanding of a topic and point them to helpful resources to continue learning on their own. For more information, visit JDGreear.com.

Ask Me Anything Podcasts J.D. Greear

    • Religion & Spirituality
    • 4.8 • 528 Ratings

Ask Me Anything, hosted by Pastor J.D. Greear, gives quick answers to some of your toughest theological, ethical, and leadership questions. For both mature and new believers alike, Ask Me Anything will help listeners grow in their understanding of a topic and point them to helpful resources to continue learning on their own. For more information, visit JDGreear.com.

    How Can I Know Where God Is Moving?

    How Can I Know Where God Is Moving?

    This week, listen into one of Pastor J.D.’s recent sermons on the life of King David as he answers the question, "How can I know where God is moving?"



    Show Notes:



    David doesn’t figure out what he wants to do and ask God to bless it; he asks God what God wants to do and seeks to follow him. We see countless examples of this, like the question that opens chapter 2: “After this, David inquired of the Lord, ‘Shall I go up into any of the cities of Judah?' And the Lord said to him, ‘Go up.’ David said, ‘To which shall I go up?’ And he said, ‘To Hebron.’ 2 So David went up there…”



    One of the phrases we have started using around the Summit Church is that success in our ministry means joining God in what he is doing around us. Success is not attempting great things for God and asking him to bless us; success is discerning where God is at work and joining him in that. 



    A lot of us go through life backwards. We assume that God has put us into the world to figure stuff out and fix everything, so our general attitude is; “God, this is what I think needs to be done; help me in it.” 

    But in every epoch of Scripture, God is the primary actor. God is the one bringing salvation and blessing to the earth. Our job is to discern where he is at work and join him. 

    Jesus explained in John 5 that this was his whole ministry philosophy. He said, “My Father is always at work around me, and my job is to figure out what he is doing and join him in it.”



    A person after God’s own heart seeks to join God in what he is doing.



    You say, “But what does that mean exactly?” How do you discern where God is at work? Great question!



    Sometimes it can take the form of a divine call that comes to you through an opportunity the Spirit invites you into. Think of Paul who got the vision of the man from Macedonia saying, “Come and help us.” Paul discerned that God was calling him to go over and be a part of what he was doing in Macedonia. Now, you may not get an actual vision, but God might let you sense some opportunity where you are positioned and gifted to help, and you sense the Spirit saying, “Come and join me in what I’m doing.”

    Or maybe it’s in a conversation that you sense God has been at work in someone’s heart and he’s put you in a place to participate. That’s what Jesus did with the woman at the well in John 4. He sensed the Father had created a sense of dissatisfaction in her and put him there to point out where she could find living water. All my sharing Jesus on an airplane or in a coffee shop are like that. I ask questions, and get a sense that God is at work in someone’s life, and I join him in that.

    Sometimes you discern where he is at work by experiencing unusual success in something. As a church, we have been involved in lots of different initiatives, but we’ve never experienced the success like we have in missions and church planting—it’s like there is a divine wind blowing behind us. We’ve sent out close to 1600 of our members on church planting teams. Other pastors ask, “How do you do this? What leadership strategies?” It’s not my leadership. I know that because a lot of other good ideas I’ve tried here have failed.” This is just an area where God is at work, and we’ve sought to join him. 



    One of my prayers for 2023 is that God would open up my ears to hear the sound of his marching so that I can join him. For most of my life, I’ve done the opposite. I’ve assumed it’s my responsibility to fix everything, and seek his help. No, that’s his job. My job is to join him in what he’s doing. At the end of the day, your greatest Strategy for Success = Submission.



    Good news: this year, I’m not responsible to win my neighbors or friends to Christ. The Holy Spirit does that. I’m not responsible to grow this church—numerically or spiritually. He does that.

    • 12 min
    What Do the Best Friendships Do?

    What Do the Best Friendships Do?

    This week, listen into one of Pastor J.D.’s recent sermons on the life of King David and his friendship with Jonathan and discover what makes the best friendship.



    Show Notes:



    Here's what David's friendship with Jonathan did:



    1. It shielded David.



    * Jonathan alerted David to danger that he was unaware of. He saw things that David could not see.

    The central point is that together is better. 

    And that’s partially because our friends see danger in our lives before we do. The definition of a blind spot is something you can’t see because you are blind to it. If you knew about it, it wouldn’t be a blind spot. You can’t see it, but quite often your friends can. Often that blind spot is in our own hearts: Proverbs 18:1, “An isolated man seeks his own desire and rages against all sound judgment.” When you get isolated, selfish heart deformities begin to grow unchecked. 

    Are people close enough to you to speak into your life? Be honest. 



    Here’s the second thing this friendship did:



    2. It strengthened David.



    Jonathan spoke courage into David’s life when David was ready to give up. He reminded David that God had great plans for his life even when David’s world seemed to be collapsing around him.

    True friends multiply your strength. God designed our hearts to work that way. 

    God made us so that our strength multiplies when we pull together with a friend. Have you experienced that?

    Close friendships sustain and strengthen us: I was re-reading something Tim Keller said the other day about marriage. He said in times of distress, it’s not the romantic part of the marriage relationship that helps, but the friendship part. He talked about going through one of the most difficult seasons of his life, and says in the middle of it that it dawned on him: His wife helped sustain him but not because she was his wife—but because she was his friend. What I needed, he said, wasn’t sex, or a roommate, or someone I shared my bank account with. It was a true soul friend. 

    And so he says to married people, or those looking to get married: “You must do everything possible, you must pay any price, to be best friends with your spouse.” Good marriages, he says, are not basically romance garnished with friendship. They are friendships garnished with romance.

    And for those of you not married, it means that the most sustaining parts of marriage are available to you. It’s not sex or sharing a bed—it’s friendship. 



    So, this friendship shielded David, and strengthened him, and lastly:



    3. It shaped David.



    * Later on we’ll see David show extreme generosity and selflessness with others. After tragedy had struck Saul and Jonathan’s house, David asked if there was any of Jonathan’s descendants he could show kindness to. And David found Jonathan had one living relative, a boy named Mephibosheth, but he was crippled. David said, “Bring him to my table. He’ll never lack anything,” and for the rest of his life David treated him like a son. That’s a generosity of spirit he learned, at least in part, from Jonathan.

    Jonathan’s character shaped David’s character. That’s what Proverbs says will happen: Proverbs 13:20, “He that walks with wise men shall be wise, but the companion of fools shall be destroyed.”

    I’ve heard Pastor Craig Groeschel say that this verse means there is one place in your lives I can look right now to accurately predict our future. It's not your New Year’s resolutions. It’s who your close friends are.

    Craig says you become the average of your five closest friends. 

    You say, “That’s depressing.” The good news in that is that if you want to change your future and are not sure where to start, you have a very actionable step: change your close friendships.  

    • 17 min
    Can You Be Active In Church and Still Go to Hell?

    Can You Be Active In Church and Still Go to Hell?

    This week, listen into one of Pastor J.D.’s recent sermons where he explained a question based on Matthew, Chapter 7: “Can you be active in church and still go to hell?”



    Show Notes:



    On that final day there will be a lot of people, Jesus says, to whom he says, “You were active in my church; you were super religious; but you never really repented; so I never knew you.”



    Are you going to be in that number? Part of my own story of coming to Christ came after a Sunday School teacher confronted me with that in middle school. It was a Friday night and my whole small group had gone over to his house so we could go bowling. But before we went, he wanted to do a short Bible study, because that’s what you do in student ministry: you bait kids with things like bowling and then hit ‘em with Bible study. And I remember him reading this passage from Matthew 7, “Many will say to me…” And then he looked at us and said, “Boys, a bunch of y’all are going to be in that number.” And that was about all he said. I knew in my heart it was going to be me.



    I was super religious. Been in church all my life. And at my church, you had to go 3x a week for it to count: 3 to thrive! I always said that the only drug problem I had growing up was getting drug to church. So, I was plenty religious, but I had never repented and surrendered to Jesus as King.



    Here’s how you can know if you’ve substituted religion for repentance:



    A. Rationalization



    * You rationalize your sin. That’s what Saul did. Look at all the good things I’ve done!

    * You never think about your sin in terms of rebellion against God; only how you compare to others.

    * I’m not having an affair, it’s just pornography.

    * I may not be fully committed in my relationship with Jesus, but I’m a good person and go to church.



    B. Unchanged behavior



    * Your mouth says that Jesus is King, but your life says something different.

    * There are 2 ways to tell what you believe: what your mouth says and what your life says. If what your mouth says differs from what your life says, God accepts the testimony of your life.

    * With Saul’s mouth he said God was King. But his life said that he was.

    * Write this down: A repentance that does not change you in life won’t save you in death, either.

    * Jesus’ half-brother, James talks about this when he says, “You say you believe in God? Good. Even the demons believe and tremble… They believe so much that they tremble at the thought of God.” But demon’s aren’t saved. Why? Because their belief doesn’t lead to repentance.

    * It’s not what your mouth says that God takes as the indicator of what you believe. It’s what your life says.



    C. Worldly sorrow not godly sorrow



    * Several times in his life, Saul wept over his sin. He did it there in 1 Samuel 28.

    * A lot of people confuse worldly sorrow over repentance. Paul talks about it in 2 Corinthians 7:10. He says, “For godly sorrow produces a repentance that leads to salvation… whereas

    worldly sorrow produces death.”

    * There are two types of sorrow over sin. There is worldly sorrow--worldly sorrow arises for all kinds of reasons. The embarrassment of being caught. Self-pity. Self-condemnation. Fear. None of those things equal repentance.

    * Confessing your sin is not repentance. You may have just been trying to relieve your guilt or get something off your chest.

    * Repentance is the Greek word “meta-noia”, which means a change of mind. To repent means you change your mind about the Kingship of Jesus and adjust your life around that new reality.

    * No change, no Jesus.



    D. Partial compliance



    * This is a big one. You start obeying God in one area but not all. Repentance is one of those things that has to be total or it is me...

    • 9 min
    Should Christians Support Gay Marriage?

    Should Christians Support Gay Marriage?

    This week we wrap up our marriage and family series. Pastor J.D. jumps from talking about traditional marriage and family to answer a controversial family question.



    Show Notes:



    Two perspectives to this: 1. Is it biblically permissible? 2. Even if it isn’t, is this one of those ‘live and let live’ areas? Not everything Christians believe about morality do we believe should be put into laws others who don’t share our beliefs should live by.



    NOTE: Please listen to the full length episode for full context. Do not rely solely on these show notes as they do not paint the full picture of what Pastor J.D. is communicating.



    Part 1: Six biblical passages--every mention is negative, either prohibiting or condemning such behavior and all very clear. 1 Corinthians 6:9–11, for instance, refers to “men who have sex with men” as a vice that would prevent a person from entering the kingdom of God. The two Greek terms he used, malakoi and arsenokoitai, were the common terms of the day to refer to a broad range of homosexual relationships.



    Common objections: 



    * “Jesus never spoke about homosexuality.”





    This is a claim that is true only in the most technical and unhelpful sense. No, Jesus never uttered the word “homosexual.” He also never mentioned (by name) rape, child abuse, fraud, or idolatry. But his stance on each of those issues is, nevertheless, quite clear.

    There are two ways that Jesus could have established what was right and wrong in regards to sexuality. He could have talked about every possible variation of the wrong, condemning each aberration one by one. Or he could put forward a vision for what is right. Think of it like this: if five women were standing side by side, and one of them was my wife, I could identify her in two ways: I could say that each of the other four were not my wife; or I could say, “That wonderful woman there…she’s my wife.” Jesus repeatedly affirmed the Mosaic understanding of the sanctity of sex within heterosexual marriage, and by doing that he disallowed all deviations.

    Furthermore, saying “Jesus never talked about it” pits the words of Jesus against the rest of the Scriptures. But Jesus himself said that all of the Scriptures were inspired, which means that the black letters in our Bible have as much divine authority as the red ones.





    * “What Paul had in mind was not the same as homosexuality as we know it today.” 





    He was, they argue, thinking of male prostitution, rape, or pedophilia. Committed same-sex relationships didn’t exist in Paul’s day, so Paul’s words don’t apply.

    This is, simply put, not true. Historian Thomas Hubbard (not a Christian), wrote an exhaustive (and exhaustively long, nearly 600 pages) work on homosexuality in the ancient world, entitled Homosexuality in Greece and Rome. He demonstrates that homosexuality existed in a wide variety of forms, much like today. And that included committed, lifelong, same-sex partners. Had Paul wanted to distinguish between valid and invalid forms of homosexuality, he could have done so.

    Or consider Romans 1, in which Paul talks about humanity’s rejection of God’s authority. Because we rejected God’s authority, “God gave them [that is, us] up to dishonorable passions. For their women exchanged natural relations for those that are contrary to nature; and the men likewise gave up natural relations with women and were consumed with passion for one another” (Romans 1:26–27). As Richard Hays says concerning this passage, Paul depicts gay and lesbian activity as an outward epitome of the inward posture of sin—rejection of the Creator’s design.





    Part 2: But can’t we believe that it is wrong and still allow marriage? Christians don’t think every wrong thing should be illegal. J Budizewski says,

    • 15 min
    Should Christian Parents Buy Lots of Gifts for their Children at Christmas?

    Should Christian Parents Buy Lots of Gifts for their Children at Christmas?

    The presents may all be unwrapped, but how much is too much? It may be too late for this Christmas, but perhaps in the new year this is a question you'd like to wrestle with in your family.



    Show Notes:



    Christmas is about gifts, mostly the extravagant gift of Jesus. 

    Jesus calls us to follow him--how did he leverage his resources. Certainly, it’s wise to understand the times we are in, that we are in the richest country in the world, and that comes with responsibility.

    1 Corinthians 10:31, "So, whether you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do all to the glory of God" (ESV). 



    Our gift giving should glorify the gospel



    It’s lavish generosity: your gift ought to make me thank God for his generosity. When I see it cost you and you care about me.









    How we do it in our house: 



    Something you want, need, wear, read

    Biggest gift at Christmas goes to Jesus! 





    John Piper: Why do we give Christmas gifts?



    Gift giving is biblical

    God’s gifts to us:



    God gives us His Son (John 3:16)

    2 Corinthians 9:15, “Thanks be to God for his inexpressible gift!” The very essence of Christmas includes a divine overflow of generosity, kindness, grace, giving–doing for us, giving to us, what we could never do for ourselves or get on our own.





    Our gifts to God:



    We have a responsibility to give to Christ. 

    It’s dangerous in one sense to speak of giving to Christ because our giving to Christ dare not be seen as a paying him back, as if the transaction were done because he needs to get our services. 

    Our giving to Christ is an overflow of affection and thankfulness for our forgiveness.

    Part of worship is finding ways to show how much we admire and reverence and trust and value Jesus.





    Our gifts to others:



    The giving of God to us and our joyful readiness to show affection in giving to him overflow in our giving to others. 

    Hebrews 13:16, “Do not neglect to do good and to share what you have, for such sacrifices are pleasing to God.”

    2 Corinthians 8:2, “In a severe test of affliction, their abundance of joy and their extreme poverty have overflowed.”

    The giving of God to us and our joyful readiness to show affection in giving to him overflow in our giving to others. 

    Hebrews 13:16, “Do not neglect to do good and to share what you have, for such sacrifices are pleasing to God.”

    2 Corinthians 8:2, “In a severe test of affliction, their abundance of joy and their extreme poverty have overflowed.”

    Our gift giving should lead others to:



    Rejoice in God as the great and first giver of the greatest gift.

    Seek the mindset that offers back to Christ the gift of trust, hope, admiration, joy, and affection.

    Seek the mindset that overflows with joy in giving to others.















    Want to ask J.D. a question? Head to our Ask Me Anything hub to submit your question.



    As always, don’t forget to rate and review this podcast!



    Find Pastor J.D. on Twitter, a href="https://www.

    • 9 min
    Should Christians Have Big Families?

    Should Christians Have Big Families?

    This week, as we continue our marriage and family series, Pastor J.D. discusses how many kids Christians should consider having.



    Show Notes:



    Proverbs 24:27: Establish your work in the field, afterward build your house.



    Doesn’t mean you have to wait a long time or that you need to be rich. But you probably don’t want to be on the rocks. 





    In general, we are waiting too long to have kids and not having enough. Not high enough value on childbearing. 



    Genesis 1: Be fruitful and multiply.



    Many would-be-prophets are currently telling us: too many kids causes poverty, global warming. We are headed for an apocalypse because of too many people. Countries that have low birth rates are the one economically struggling so that argument doesn't hold up.





    Psalm 127: no magic number.





    But what about taking time to get to know each other? I get it, honeymoon phase. But I got to know my wife so much better after we had kids; I didn't get less of her when we had kids, I got more. 

    Have a parenting strategy: 



    Contrary to Beatles, love is not ALL you need. 

    Parenting catches you so off guard.







    Want to ask J.D. a question? Head to our Ask Me Anything hub to submit your question.



    As always, don’t forget to rate and review this podcast!



    Find Pastor J.D. on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook.

    • 9 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
528 Ratings

528 Ratings

Acoustic Selection ,

To the point quality info

JD does a phenomenal job breaking down questions we all face daily.

lily7645 ,

My question:

My favorite podcast! Wish it was longer or had more episodes throughout the week.
Here is my question for JD:
How does God view non-essential plastic surgery? It has become so normalized nowadays, and I just don’t know what to think.

The_Dunc ,

Ask Me Anything

JD is very candid and helpful in these podcasts. Sometimes I almost feel like he is reading my emails and texts! Great listening!!

Top Podcasts In Religion & Spirituality

Ascension
D-Group
Ascension
Proverbs 31 Ministries
iHeartPodcasts
AccessMore & Candy Rock

You Might Also Like

J.D. Greear Ministries
The Summit Church
Radical
Radical
The Gospel Coalition, Collin Hansen
The Gospel Coalition