216 episodes

JP Moery’s Association Hustle Podcast: Host JP Moery, President of The Moery Company, offers a weekly episode featuring insights and strategies – and, a little bit of hustle – to help 21st-century associations thrive in a progressively complex and competitive business landscape.

Association Hustle The Moery Company (JP Moery)

    • Non-Profit

JP Moery’s Association Hustle Podcast: Host JP Moery, President of The Moery Company, offers a weekly episode featuring insights and strategies – and, a little bit of hustle – to help 21st-century associations thrive in a progressively complex and competitive business landscape.

    PODCAST | Association Hustle Podcast – Episode 216: Building Strong Relationship between Associations and Consultants

    PODCAST | Association Hustle Podcast – Episode 216: Building Strong Relationship between Associations and Consultants

    Associations are outsourcing work and will be out sourcing even more in the years to come. Listen in as JP Moery taps into 30 years of being on both sides of the equation and provides six best practice tips for building and managing relationships for associations and consultants.



     



     



     



     



     







     



    Transcript:



    Hello, and welcome to JP Moery's Association Hustle Podcast. President of The Moery Company, JP's mission is to arm today's associations with insight and strategy to thrive in a progressively complex and competitive business landscape. Twenty-first century associations must move forward with a little bit of hustle and revenue development at their core. Here's JP.



    Today I've got some tips for associations and consultants alike: how to manage your relationship.



    In my 30 year career in the association and consulting space, I've spent almost equal time being the client (the association) and the consultant. I’ve got insights and perspectives that I’d like to share with you.



    The following six things might be helpful for you in managing these relationships better, and in a more productive way, in the year ahead.



    First, tell the consultant the real reason you're considering them. Why do you need their help? Too often the client talks in circles about why they need help or making up excuses as to why the association needs the help. And, in fact, I think it's empowering for the consultant, and very helpful, to know exactly the reason why they're being asked to be involved in this project, including, "I just don't want to do this." I've got a guy who mows my lawn every week. I can make up a bunch of reasons, however, the fundamental reason is: I don't want to do it. Go ahead and tell that consultant, and be very transparent, about the reason why you've asked them to become involved.



    Second tip I've got for you: let the consulting firm do it. Fully. If you don't want to do it in the first place then you're probably not very good at it anyway. Let the professionals do it. I have had more mistakes happen because the expert, or the specialist, wasn't doing the work. Or, the client wouldn't allow the consultant to actually do what they hired them to do. It's unproductive, it's a waste of the consultant’s time and, frankly, it's a waste of the association's money. Hire them and then get out of the way.



    The third thing that is productive is this: give the consultant the chance to get off the hook during the sales process. Ask them the following questions, "What is a red flag in terms of this project that I've described for you? Is there anything that's unreasonable or that I might not have right that you need to tell me about now?" Give that consultant the chance to answer that question.



    I'll give you an example that I used to see in membership recruitment all the time, "Hey, Moery Company! Hey, JP! We want you to sell membership for us."



    Fantastic! We're going to do it! Man, I'm fired up!



    “Okay, tell me about the program right now and how we can help!”



    "Well, we recruited five new members last year and we've got a new chairman. We've got a lot of people that are in this industry that we don't have as members. We want to recruit 5000 new members this year. It's a special program and initiative. We're calling it Project 5000." The numbers may be a bit expanded, however, it's pretty close to the truth of what a client told us during a sales call. That may sound crazy, yet, the consultant may not tell you that that because they don't want to jeopardize getting the business from you. I advise our association clients to ask the consultant this question, "Hey, this is what we think the project is about and ...

    • 9 min
    PODCAST | Association Hustle Podcast – Episode 215: Productivity Hacks for the New Year

    PODCAST | Association Hustle Podcast – Episode 215: Productivity Hacks for the New Year

    JP Moery shares his top three productivity hacks for the new year featuring advice from Andy Frisella, Kseniya Martin, and Tim Ferriss.



     



     



     



     



     







     



    Transcript:



    Hello and welcome to JP Moery's Association Hustle Podcast. President of The Moery Company, JP's mission is to arm today's associations with insight and strategy to thrive in a progressively complex and competitive business landscape. Twenty-first century associations must move forward with a little bit of hustle and revenue development at their core. Here's JP.



    For today's podcast I have three productivity hacks that I've received from other individuals that have helped me tremendously and I want to give them credit.



    The first is the Power 5 List from Andy Frisella, who has the MFCEO Project Podcast that I learn a great deal from. By the way, you should go download some of those episodes, they're very profane but I think very focused and very motivational. Five things that no matter what your schedule is or what you have in place or the number of meetings that you might have... What are the five things that you should do every day no matter what? And if you do all five, it's a win. Let me give you my Power 5 as an example.







    *  Work out.

    *  Bible study and a 10 minute meditation. I have found meditation and Bible study so helpful to me.

    *  Thank you notes. I write one to at least one person a day.

    *  Twenty contacts with clients or prospects about the company or opportunities that we see and to do business together.

    *  Tell my family that I love them.







    Those are the five things that, no matter what happens and I do those five things, it's been a good day. I also write down, in my journal, those five things. Did I finish them or not? And, if I did, that means that day was a win.



    The second productivity hack is selecting a theme for 2020, or a theme for the new year. I got this from our Communications Director, Kseniya Martin. I found it to be so helpful that I've already developed my theme for 2020 and I'll tell you about it in a few moments. But first I want to give you a little context on what this all means. Pick one word that will be your theme, your North Star, or a specific focus for the year or a select time frame ahead. The word, or theme, can be focus, motivate, sober, prey, health, action, lead, etc. One-word themes that will become the filter and stay at the top of your mind and dictate your activity, your program, your priorities, your action. And it will from year to year.



    As an example, my focus is on business.



    Over the last ten years I've spent much of my time in the business: selling, doing client work, working on things inside of the business instead of on the business. And now, as The Moery Company goes into its next decade, it's really important for me to work on the business. That means working at our pricing structure, looking at new services, considering collaboration or partnerships, or buying new companies, dropping or renewing new clients, communicating the culture to our team, making sure that we have the right people on the bus and in the right seats. Much of my focus in 2020 is going to be on business. Now, that doesn't mean that I won't still be doing some of this client work or I won't be doing some proposals or working with my colleague Mike Thomas on some of those things. But be clear, the theme is on business in 2020, at least for JP Moery. So, what's your theme? Make it an action word if possible.



    The third, and final item, is conducting a calendar audit. I received this from Tim Ferriss from his Tools of Titan's book. First,

    • 8 min
    PODCAST | Association Hustle Podcast – Episode 214: Competing in the Digital Age

    PODCAST | Association Hustle Podcast – Episode 214: Competing in the Digital Age

    Associations are thinking about their competition more than ever, however, their biggest competition is now the internet. And it's not going away. You don’t have to do it all when it comes to competing in the digital age but you have to do it. And you have to do it at scale. Listen in as JP Moery provides insights into how The Moery Company has been able to scale content and the effort's impact on the bottom line.



     



     



     



     



     







     



    Transcript:



    Hello and welcome to JP Moery's Association Hustle Podcast. President of the Moery Company, JP's mission is to arm today's associations with insight and strategy to thrive in a progressively complex and competitive business landscape. Twenty-first century associations must move forward with a little bit of hustle and revenue development at their core. Here's JP.



    I'm going to talk about competition. Oh, baby, I love to compete. And I know your associations are thinking about competition more than ever before.



    Let's talk about competing in a digital world, especially in the area of communications. I got news for you: this internet thing is not going away.  It's the biggest deal since the printing press. The iPhone is the new television. You can broadcast live right now, if you want to. Associations need to capture that kind of feel.



    This new digital age of communication is set up for organic, new, fast-moving, and authentic communications. It means you have no choice but to do it. And you have to do it at scale; that's the challenge that many of our organizations run into. We're used to controlled, stay-on-message, respond, chain of command, and it's almost like those characteristics are the antithesis of communicating in today's digital world. So, that's the challenge for our associations.



    People are on their phone all the time; they can broadcast immediately. Think about the power of going to Capitol Hill with your members and doing Facebook Live about their experiences. Are you willing to do that? Are you willing to hear a member say something a little bit different than what you might expect? Yeah? But the upside is you're showing value in real time. That's what's really important. So, my challenge to you is, loosen the rope. Give yourself some bandwidth to innovate, to experiment, to try some new things, to do some live videos, to start a podcast. Launch it this year. Launch it now!



    I've got so many association clients that are wringing their hands about email open rates, wringing their hands about a newsletter, wringing their hands about a magazine and the business model behind it. Yet they have no live video, they don't have a YouTube channel, they don't have a podcast. Man, they're looking backwards! The ability to look forward is really what the opportunity is of embracing this new methodology.



    By the way, here's the other part of this: we're talking about reaching the member of the future, reaching the members of our association that may be coming up the management ranks right now. They're not thinking about, "Man, the magazine's late!" They're thinking, "Oh my gosh, what are they doing on all these new platforms?!" That's what they're looking for. If you want to get new demographics, if you want to get new members, if you want to meet the up-and-coming folks that are in your industry... Believe me, they're on mobile. Believe me, they're on digital. Believe me they're on audio. That's where they are and if you want to reach them, that's where you need to put your content. That's my simple perspective.



    Let me give you a story about our company. About two to three years ago we started live video, we started podcasting, we started blogging at scale.

    • 5 min
    PODCAST | Association Hustle Podcast – Episode 213: How Associations Tell Their Stories

    PODCAST | Association Hustle Podcast – Episode 213: How Associations Tell Their Stories

    Associations don’t need to tell their stories, they need to tell their members' stories! This episode explores the three types of stories you should be telling about how your association helps you members.



     



     



     



     



     







     



    Transcript:



    Hello and welcome to JP Moery's Association Hustle Podcast. President of the Moery Company, JP's mission is to arm today's associations with insight and strategy to thrive in a progressively complex and competitive business landscape. Twenty-first century associations must move forward with a little bit of hustle and revenue development at their core. Here's JP.



    Association storytelling... it sounds like that's a session at some ASAE convention! I'm going to give you a little bit of my perspective. The associations need to tell their members' story more. I realize that's more work. You've got to capture that content. A lot of the association communication, even about their value proposition, even about the success stories of the organization is more about the association rather than the members. And, what I'm finding increasingly around membership development, it's the stories that members have that are most important for the organization.



    So, let me give you a couple of examples. And, by the way, I think this is a fantastic opportunity in the digital communication's Internet 2.0 world, or whatever the heck we're in right now! It's built for this kind of organic, rough, authentic type of communication. Which is, by the way, what you're going to get from your association members. So, as an example, I have a story from a member about how they've been affected by a regulatory issue and how an association helped them. I use this example often, because it's true and it happened, association member prospect had a problem they didn't even know existed about a regulation in California. They had product that was going to be illegal to sell to consumers in that state. They didn't know about it until the association made them familiar with it. That was an easy sell once they were aware of it, once they knew the association was monitoring the situation and, in fact, they were negotiating with the regulatory body about some of the provisions in this regulation. Oh my God, that association prospect signed up right away. So that's the kind of information or storytelling that we need.



    Education. If you have an educational or training program worth its salt, I know that you have individuals that could tell a story about how it made them a better executive. How they became a better executive made their company better, more profitable, more innovative, more relevant in the industry. That's the thing that's missing in the educational storytelling that might be valuable to your industry and, not only your prospective members, but your existing members because they're the people that buy the training and the educational programming the most.



    Finally, I want to talk about business development and storytelling. Oh my gosh, folks, if we don't have stories about how your members are working together, or how they're collaborating on projects, then we've got a real problem with our value proposition. I was in a manufacturing association meeting the other day where a member told a story about how they were getting ready to buy a new piece of equipment. They called a competitor, and another manufacturing member, that had the piece of equipment so they could visit and see that piece of equipment in action. That's only possible in associations. Those are the stories that we must tell because it's relevant, because it's real, because it actually happened and the people in the industry are the storytellers themselves. This is essential in this world that we're in.

    • 4 min
    PODCAST | Association Hustle – Episode 212: What’s in Your Membership Toolbox

    PODCAST | Association Hustle – Episode 212: What’s in Your Membership Toolbox

    There is a handful of fundamental "items" that need to be in your association's membership toolbox. Listen in as JP Moery, president of The Moery Company, explains the three main items you should focus on for successful membership recruitment and management.



     



     



     



     



     







    Transcript:



    Hello and welcome to JP Moery's Association Hustle Podcast. President of the Moery Company, JP's mission is to arm today's associations with insight and strategy to thrive in a progressively complex and competitive business landscape. Twenty First Century associations must move forward with a little bit of hustle and revenue development at their core. Here’s JP.



    Hi, welcome to the Association Hustle Podcast. Today's question is: what's in your membership toolbox?



    I think there are some fundamental things that you got to put in that toolbox that you've got to take to work every single day so let me give you a few thoughts. Number one is the value proposition of your organization. Not what you put in a brochure ten years ago and you just continue to update and put some different graphics around it. What is the true value proposition of your organization according to the members of your organization? I want their real-life stories. Why they join, what they gained in terms of value from the organization. Tell me about a specific situation where the legislative affairs program helped them. I'll give you an example. The other day I heard from a member of a manufacturing association that understood from a webinar [about] potential tariffs that were coming into their industry. They pre-purchased a lot of commodities because of the tariffs that we're getting ready to happen and saved possibly millions of dollars. I want those specific stories.



    The second [tool] is testimonials and referrals. Pick half-a-dozen association members that are willing to send a quick email [or] leave a voicemail message, in some way endorse or refer prospects to you. We need someone during the sales process at a strategic time to speak on our behalf and tell a story that goes something like this, "Hey, I was a small business, too. I wasn't sure if the association was a fit for me. My perception was it was for big businesses but then once I joined and I went to the annual meeting I was able to meet some of the VIPs of this industry. I do work for them now and my business has grown exponentially because I was a member of the association. I was in the same situation you were and I decided to make the move and it's absolutely changed my business.” Hard stop. But we need those kinds of testimonials. You're probably not going to get them at scale but, man, two or three of those will be very helpful.



    My third thing [that should be] in your toolbox is Salesforce CRM, or something similar to it. We've got a golden rule in this company: if it's not in Salesforce it didn't happen. I realized that's a double negative but you've got to log every single contact you have with a prospect. Over time you start to learn what's effective. You start to identify how many calls it might take to close a deal. You might see the tactics that work. Is it better to email? Is it better to make a direct phone call? Is it better to have a face-to-face meeting? You start to really learn the cadence of your membership development work. But if you don't put it into a Salesforce [type] system, or a CRM where you can get a pipeline on a moment's notice, or you can't generate an activity report when somebody requests it... you've got a problem because your process isn't sound.



    Let's revisit these real quick!



    One: value proposition from the members perspective. Why?



    Second: testimonials and referrals from members that have something tangible to ta...

    • 6 min
    Association Hustle - Episode 211: The State of Association Membership Sales

    Association Hustle - Episode 211: The State of Association Membership Sales

    Tune in as JP Moery, president of The Moery Company, talks about what's working, what's not working, and the trends he's seeing in association membership sales backed by data.



     



     



     



     



     







     



     



    Transcript:



    Hello and welcome to JP Moery's Association Hustle Podcast. President of The Moery Company, JP's mission is to arm today's associations with insight and strategy to thrive in a progressively complex and competitive business landscape. Twenty-first century associations must move forward with a little bit of hustle and revenue development at their core. Here's JP.



    It's JP Moery, I'm glad to be with you today. I'm doing a session on the state of association sales and I'm going to specifically stay on the topic of membership.



    Association membership sales but, frankly, I know I've got a lot of folks that are entrepreneurs and they're in just all the types of sales. I think it's going to apply to you too.



    Here's what I see working in the association field right now: they're starting to be some real improvements in the value proposition and membership category modernization. You're updating your benefits, you're updating your services, you're letting new entrants come into the space, you're developing membership categories for them. Very positive. The dues levels that you're developing better reflect the industry realities. We're seeing a lot of organization, as an example, taking off the dues cap because their membership based on revenue is growing so much so you're modernizing those levels. It's a good step forward.



    The other thing: there's an improvement of membership retention and engagement.



    My friends at Marketing General, their 90 percent retention rate in trade association membership is absolutely fantastic. The other thing that I think is starting to happen is we've got a better acceptance that business development and sales can be an accepted component of a non-profit mindset. When I got into this business a few years ago, and business development was frankly a dirty word, now it's becoming a more accepted practice in our nonprofit organizations.



    The challenges, or what is not working: chief staff executives really have an apathy toward revenue generation. They don't want to get their hands dirty with it, yet we see some of the most successful association executives of all time be very good at raising money and they have the resources to accomplish missions. Tangible data for reasons to join, renew, engage, or drop the membership is lacking. We're collecting information but we're not utilizing that data to make decisions about why people are joining, why they're being engaged, and why they're actually not renewing.



    That stuff is so critical to move forward and develop strategies to either compensate, alleviate, or take advantage of those scenarios. A lack of sales process and reporting is still in place.



    Association management systems, in my experience and what I've heard from my clients, are not great sales CRMs. If you listen to a lot of our podcasts, we use Salesforce. It generates weekly reports, pipelines, activity. It measures the sales metrics of closed ratios, number of activities, etc. It can be very valuable.



    There's a commitment to legacy programs in your membership, regardless of whether there's a business justification for it.



    There are some member benefits and programs and services, sometimes in the affinity area, that frankly need to go away. You're wasting your time and your energy on those projects and frankly they don't move the needle for your members anyway. When members don't see value in a program it actually lowers their impression of the value p...

    • 6 min

Customer Reviews

Scott from DC ,

Must Listen for Association Professionals

JP offers practical ideas from his years of experience and challenges his listeners to take their organizations to new heights.

sophie/maddie ,

Amazing Podcast

Best podcast I’ve heard in a while. Excellent insight

ARLCAE ,

Must Listen for Association Execs

JP provides food for thought and good reminders for best practices

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