47 episodes

Astronomy 141, Life in the Universe, is a one-quarter introduction to
Astrobiology for non-science majors taught at The Ohio State University.
This podcast presents audio recordings of Professor Richard Pogge's
lectures from his Autumn Quarter 2009 class. All of the lectures were
recorded live in 1005 Smith Laboratory on the OSU Main Campus in Columbus,
Ohio.

Astronomy 141 - Life in the Universe Richard Pogge

    • Education
    • 4.7 • 158 Ratings

Astronomy 141, Life in the Universe, is a one-quarter introduction to
Astrobiology for non-science majors taught at The Ohio State University.
This podcast presents audio recordings of Professor Richard Pogge's
lectures from his Autumn Quarter 2009 class. All of the lectures were
recorded live in 1005 Smith Laboratory on the OSU Main Campus in Columbus,
Ohio.

    Welcome to Astronomy 141

    Welcome to Astronomy 141

    Welcome to the Astronomy 141 Lecture Podcasts. This is a brief message
    from me explaining the podcasts, and welcoming new and old listeners.
    University. Lectures will begin on Wednesday, 2009 Sept 23, and run
    through Friday, 2009 Dec 4. New lectures will appear shortly before 6pm
    US Eastern Time each day there is a regular class.
    Recorded live on 2009 Sep 23 in Room 1005 Smith Laboratory on the
    Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

    Lecture 1: Introduction

    Lecture 1: Introduction

    A brief overview of the topics we will cover in
    Astronomy 141, setting the stage for how we can make a serious
    scientific inquiry out of the question of whether or not there is life
    elsewhere in the Universe. It is a short lecture, the first half was an
    overview of course mechanics (tests, homework, office hours, etc.) that
    I did not record. Recorded live on 2009 Sep 23 in Room 1005 Smith
    Laboratory on the Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

    • 19 min
    Lecture 2: Astronomical Numbers

    Lecture 2: Astronomical Numbers

    An introduction and review of the basic notation and physical units we will be
    using throughout this course. In particular, we will be using the
    Metric (SI) system for lengths, masses, times, and temperatures, and
    special astronomical units for distances (AU and Light Years) and masses
    (Earth Masses and Solar Masses) appropriate when discussing
    interplanetary and interstellar scales. Recorded live on 2009 Sep 24 in
    Room 1005 Smith Laboratory on the Columbus campus of The Ohio State
    University.

    • 43 min
    Lecture 3: Imagining Other Worlds

    Lecture 3: Imagining Other Worlds

    What is the cultural history of our imaginings of other worlds and their
    possible inhabitants? I will draw examples from history, philosophy,
    literature, cinema, and popular culture. In the end,
    our imaginings about other worlds inform us more about ourselves, our
    hopes and our fears, than about extraterrestrial life. The scientific
    inquiry we are undertaking must therefore approach the problem from a
    different direction. Recorded live on 2009 Sep 25 in Room 1005 Smith
    Laboratory on the Columbus campus of The Ohio State University.

    • 40 min
    Lecture 4: The Copernican Revolution

    Lecture 4: The Copernican Revolution

    Modern science was borne of an effort over many centuries to understand
    the motions of celestial bodies. The Copernican Revolution of the 16th
    and 17th centuries was the crucial moment in history when we finally
    understood the nature of celestial motions, and opened the door to the
    modern world. This lecture reviews the problem of celestial motions,
    the two competing models for explaining them, and the final revolution
    in thought starting with Copernicus and ending with Newton. Mid-lecture
    my classroom AV system lost power, and the recovery slowed things down a
    bit. These are recorded live, after all. This lecture was conducted on
    2009 Sep 28 in Room 1005 Smith Laboratory on the Columbus campus of The
    Ohio State University.

    • 43 min
    Lecture 5: The Chemical Revolution and the Nature of Matter

    Lecture 5: The Chemical Revolution and the Nature of Matter

    What is the nature of matter, and how did we come to understand the
    chemical elements and atomic structure? This lecture is a brief and
    selective overview of the history of our understanding of the nature of
    matter and chemistry. We will also introduce spectroscopy and
    radioactivity, two very powerful tools that came out of the chemical
    revolution that are crucial for the inquiry in this class into the
    question of life on other worlds. Recorded live on 2009 Sep 29 in Room
    1005 Smith Laboratory on the Columbus campus of The Ohio State
    University.

    • 45 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
158 Ratings

158 Ratings

Camo.4 ,

Refreshing

A nice change from listening to hosts laughing at their own stupid jokes, and 20 min of nonsense to get to relevant topics. Just wish there were more current episodes!

nerdyhead ,

Very Good

Great classes and really interesting info laid out in an easy to understand manner. These are great if you are interested in astronomy!

Paul O'Gorman ,

Unreal

These hit the spot

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