20 min

Author Interview: Connie Goldsmith, author of Kiyo Sato The Lerner Podcast

    • Books

Today on the Lerner podcast, I am joined by Connie Goldsmith, a retired registered nurse with a master's degree in health who writes books about history, health, and science for older children. Her most recent book has just come out: Kiyo Sato: From a WWII Japanese Internment Camp to a Life of Service. In 1941 Kiyo Sato and her eight younger siblings lived with their parents on a small farm near Sacramento, California. The Satos were an ordinary American family. Until they weren’t. On December 7, 1941, Japan bombed the US naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The next day, US president Franklin Roosevelt declared war on Japan and the United States officially entered World War II. Soon after, in February and March 1942, Roosevelt signed two executive orders that paved the way for the military to round up all Japanese Americans living on the West Coast and incarcerate them in isolated internment camps for the duration of the war. Kiyo and her family were among the nearly 120,000 internees. In this moving account, Sato and Goldsmith tell the story of the internment years, describing why the internment happened and how it impacted Kiyo and her family. They also discuss the ways in which Kiyo has used her experience to educate other Americans about their history, to promote inclusion, and to fight against similar injustices.

Today on the Lerner podcast, I am joined by Connie Goldsmith, a retired registered nurse with a master's degree in health who writes books about history, health, and science for older children. Her most recent book has just come out: Kiyo Sato: From a WWII Japanese Internment Camp to a Life of Service. In 1941 Kiyo Sato and her eight younger siblings lived with their parents on a small farm near Sacramento, California. The Satos were an ordinary American family. Until they weren’t. On December 7, 1941, Japan bombed the US naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The next day, US president Franklin Roosevelt declared war on Japan and the United States officially entered World War II. Soon after, in February and March 1942, Roosevelt signed two executive orders that paved the way for the military to round up all Japanese Americans living on the West Coast and incarcerate them in isolated internment camps for the duration of the war. Kiyo and her family were among the nearly 120,000 internees. In this moving account, Sato and Goldsmith tell the story of the internment years, describing why the internment happened and how it impacted Kiyo and her family. They also discuss the ways in which Kiyo has used her experience to educate other Americans about their history, to promote inclusion, and to fight against similar injustices.

20 min

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