117 episodes

An aviation podcast by aviation geeks for anyone who looks up when they hear an airplane fly overhead. Listen in as Ian Petchenik and Jason Rabinowitz bring you aviation news, views, and special guests every Friday. If you're a new avgeek or just can't get enough aviation in your life, get your avgeek fix with us.

AvTalk - Aviation Podcast Flightradar24

    • Leisure
    • 4.9 • 368 Ratings

An aviation podcast by aviation geeks for anyone who looks up when they hear an airplane fly overhead. Listen in as Ian Petchenik and Jason Rabinowitz bring you aviation news, views, and special guests every Friday. If you're a new avgeek or just can't get enough aviation in your life, get your avgeek fix with us.

    Is Boom all noise?

    Is Boom all noise?

    On this episode of AvTalk, we welcome aerospace journalists John Walton and Jon Ostrower to discuss United Airlines’ order for Boom’s Supersonic Overture jet, and the likelihood of the aircraft ever entering service.

    Our discussion of United’s order for Boom’s proposed supersonic jet covers the challenges Boom, and any airline seeking to fly the supersonic jet, will encounter.

    Technology

    BOOM’s Overture aircraft currently lacks a critical component for flight: engines. While Rolls Royce is in talks to provide an engine for Overture, there is no deal—or design—ready at the moment.

    Money

    Aircraft development is hard and expensive. Billions of dollars expensive. So far, Boom just doesn’t have enough cash to get it from paper to passenger airplane.

    No one likes a sonic boom

    Opposition to supersonic flights over land will be a main driver of where any future supersonic aircraft can operate. And that in turn, leads to…

    Economics

    The small market and multitude of constraints on any supersonic aircraft’s operations makes the economic case for such an airplane very challenging.

    Environmental costs and challenges

    Boom has said it’s designing the Overture to run on 100% ‘Sustainable Aviation Fuel’ (SAF). But that doesn’t solve the problem of having to burn many times more fuel than a comparable subsonic flight in the first place. Nor does it account for where the SAF is going to come from. SAF accounts for a tiny percentage of global fuel stocks at the moment and raising that share to the level necessary to support supersonic flights is by no means an easy feat.

    Let us know what you think (and let your friends know)

    Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us. And tell that friend who asked you for a podcast recommendation that AvTalk is the one they want to listen to next.

     

    • 46 min
    Shootin’ the Breeze

    Shootin’ the Breeze

    On this episode of AvTalk, we try to fit in as many Breeze Airways puns as we can as Jason fills us in on the airline’s inaugural flight. We also take stock of the situation in Belarus and see where things stand now. Plus, Airbus is getting ready to ramp up A320 family production in a big way.

    Jason puts wind in his sails on the Breeze inaugural

    Jason took the inaugural Breeze Airways flight and it carried him aloft, but it didn’t sweep him off his feet.

    Update on the situation in Belarus

    We discuss the current status of the situation in Belarus, which airlines have changed routes, and how Belavia, the Belarusian airline is adapting to increased restrictions on where it can fly.

    Boeing meets the FAA

    Boeing has halted deliveries of the 787 again. It has also reached a settlement with the FAA and agreed to pay a $17 million fine related to unapproved sensors on the 737NG and 737 MAX and possibly non-conforming slat tracks on the 737 MAX. We dig into both issues.

    Airbus’ assembly lines getting ready to pick up speed

    Airbus is preparing its suppliers for a big jump in the number of A320 family aircraft it produces every month over the next 4 years.

    Sure seems like things are improving

    We look at some of the positive steps and data points we’ve seen this week that makes us think we’re moving in the right direction.

    The winglet thingy

    HiFly is preparing to test a wing-tip device designed by The Aircraft Performance Company on one of its A330s that is intended to reduce fuel consumption beyond a standard winglet. We’ll let you see for yourselves.

    Let us know what you think (and let your friends know)

    Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us. And tell that friend who asked you for a podcast recommendation that AvTalk is the one they want to listen to next.

    • 33 min
    Ryanair flight 4978 forced to land in Belarus

    Ryanair flight 4978 forced to land in Belarus

    On this episode of AvTalk, we discuss the forcible diversion of a Ryanair flight from Athens to Vilnius to Minsk, Belarus and the ensuing international response.

    On 23 May, Ryanair flight 4978 was forcibly diverted by Belarus. Aviation journalist Seth Miller of PaxEx.aero joins us as we discuss what happened, the international reaction, and why all of this matters.

    Helpful links



    * Flight data for Ryanair flight 4978

    * Where Belarus-based airlines can now fly

    * Who was flying over Belarus before last week

    * Lawfare blog Seth mentions



    Other things that happened this week

    Supersonic start-up Aerion is no more, SpiceJet is under investigation for an onboard wedding in the middle of a COVID-19 outbreak, Emirates president Sir Tim Clark turns heads again with his comments on the 777X, and the US FAA downgrades Mexico to safety category 2.

    • 40 min
    They walked away from a mid-air collision

    They walked away from a mid-air collision

    On this episode of AvTalk, a Metroliner and SR22 collide over Denver and everyone walks away safely. A Boutique Air flight loses a door. And Boeing fixes the latest issue with the 737 MAX.

    Metroliner vs SR22

    A Cirrus SR22 and Key Lime Air Swearingen Metroliner collided near Denver’s Centennial Airport last week. Everyone walked away safely. We cover what we know so far.

    Boutique Air flight loses a door

    A Boutique Air flight from Minneapolis to Ironwood didn’t get very far last week. On the departure roll on the runway, the aircraft’s cargo door opened.

    737 MAX updates

    Boeing has developed a fix for the potential electrical grounding issue on some 737 MAX aircraft. Some airlines have already repaired theirs and put them back into service, while Boeing has begun delivering the aircraft once again.

    Which airlines are on the move, and which are still grounded?

    JetBlue is finally, actually flying to London with tickets going on sale this week from New York to both Heathrow and Gatwick airports. PLAY airlines, founded by a group of former WOW executives, is set to launch next month from Iceland. And Porter Airlines, which has been been grounded since last year due to the pandemic border restrictions between the US and Canada, has extended its suspension of service through at least July.

    Koru Care

    Air New Zealand’s special Koru Care flight was this week and 50 kids with disabilities or terminal illnesses got the flight of a lifetime.

    Is Alaska, is not Alaska?

    Ian takes issue with the phrase “Proudly all Boeing” and invites you to set him straight.

    Big podcast news!

    We’re moving to a weekly format! You’ll hear Ian and Jason twice as often beginning next week. The show format will stay similar, but we’ll likely keep the episodes a bit shorter. Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.

    • 40 min
    NTSB Investigator Sean Payne, Part 2

    NTSB Investigator Sean Payne, Part 2

    On this episode of AvTalk, we continue our conversation with NTSB investigator Sean Payne to discuss the NTSB’s most wanted list and their call for crash protected recorders to be installed in all passenger carrying commercial aircraft.

    More MAX news

    The FAA issued its airworthiness directive saying some 737 MAX with electrical grounding issues need to be fixed before they can fly again. But Boeing is still working on the service bulletin to tell operators how to do that.

    Separately, an airworthiness directive mandates checks on some CFM LEAP-1B engines that power the 737 MAX. These checks are due to ‘pressure transducer corrosion following extended storage periods.’

    ZeroAvia makes ‘off airport landing’

    ZeroAvia’s hydrogen-powered prototype made an ‘off airport landing’ earlier this week. The aircraft’s left wing was torn off the fuselage after its landing gear dug into the soft earth in a field next to the airport following a forced landing. Luckily there were no serious injuries and the company and investigators have begun the process of understanding what went wrong.

    The tower is empty, but there are plenty of eyes watching

    London City airport became the first major airport to transition to a remote control tower earlier this year and made the announcement publicly last Friday.

    Orders and fleet changes

    Incremental change seems to to be the order of the day as airlines add a handful of new aircraft to their order book to complement their new fleet structures in a post-Covid world. We discuss changes at Lufthansa, Silk Way, and Aeromexico. And Malaysia Airlines confirms its A380s will exit the fleet.

    NTSB’s most wanted list with Sean Payne

    We welcome back Sean Payne for part 2 of our discussion to dig in to the NTSB’s most wanted list, especially the board’s continued call for the installation of image recorders on the flight deck of commercial aircraft. We discuss what the NTSB actually means when they say image recorders and the lack of any crash protected recorders in many passenger carrying commercial aircraft.

    Listen to part 1 of our conversation here

     

    Delay code? What’s a delay code?

    News from United Airlines this week that they’ll do away with Delay codes prompts Ian to ask Jason, “Hey, what’s a delay code, and why do I care?” Turns out, if you have a tight connection, you might care a great deal.

    New Airlines

    There are new airlines sprouting up all over the place! Avelo, Aero K, Bees, the a new mysterious entrant into the space formerly occupied by Joon, Super Air Jet.

    Let us know what you think (and let your friends know)

    Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.

     

    • 1 hr 7 min
    NTSB Investigator Sean Payne, Part 1

    NTSB Investigator Sean Payne, Part 1

    On this episode of AvTalk, we welcome Sean Payne, an investigator with the US National Transportation Safety Board, for the first in a two-part interview. In part one this week, Payne walks us through how the NTSB collects, processes, and uses information from aircraft data recorders to help determine the cause of an accident.

    First flight on Mars

    NASA’s Ingenuity helicopter made its first flight this week, achieving the first powered, controlled flight on another planet. The first flight lasted 39.1 seconds and reached a height of 3 meters (10 feet).

    Trans-Tasman bubble

    Perhaps paving the way forward for other travel success stories, the Trans-Tasman bubble opened this week, allowing Australians and New Zealanders to fly between the two countries quarantine free.

    737 MAX electrical issues

    Boeing continues to look for a fix for the electrical grounding issues on some 737 MAX, while airlines keep those airplanes on the ground.

    NTSB investigator Sean Payne

    Sean Payne is a mechanical engineer by training and an NTSB investigator in the vehicle recorder division. He walks us through how investigators locate, download, and analyze data from the Flight Data Recorder and Cockpit Voice Recorders during accident investigations.

    This is part 1 of our two part conversation with Payne. He’ll join us next week for part 2 to discuss the future of recording devices and what the NTSB is hoping authorities will mandate.

    Additional reading on NTSB procedures for data recorders



    * FAA Advisory Circular on Flight Data Recorders

    * FAA Advisory Circular on Cockpit Voice Recorders

    * NTSB FDR handbook

    * NTSB CVR handbook



    Programming notes

    Jason and Ian joined the PlaneTalkingUK podcast last week and had a great time. Watch the episode here.

    And AvTalk is now on Amazon Music. So if you like to listen to your podcasts there, give us a follow so that each new episode is automatically placed in your library.

    Let us know what you think (and let your friends know)

    Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.

    • 1 hr 7 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
368 Ratings

368 Ratings

aSoCalPilot ,

Interesting airlines news and analysis

I look forward to listening to this posdcast every 2 weeks when it’s released. Ian and Jason provide fascinating insights into current events in the airline industry. I appreciate their knowledge of the industry and their analysis of the events as they unfold. I highly recommend the podcast for anyone with an interest in the biz of airlines.

Jetpipe28 ,

Love the concept

But no, these aren’t experts.

K/M/S ,

Fair, info-laden and to the point

Among aviation podcasts, this one is a shining star: it features interviews with very interesting people in “the biz”, intelligent humor, professionalism and no posturing. It’s much more like reportage - a seemingly forgotten form of production - than a talk show. Excellent work!

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