18 min

Balance & Barrier: Slowing the Spongy Moth's Spread Forestcast

    • Earth Sciences

Insect biological control comes in all shapes and sizes — parasitoids, predators, or pathogens. So, what happens when neither a parasitoid nor a predator are feasible? Well, sometimes we have to turn away from using insects to attack insect pests, and turn to using an even smaller organism, something microscopic: a pathogen — in this case a fungus. Related Research:
“Introduction and Establishment of Entomophaga maimaiga, a Fungal Pathogen of Gypsy Moth in Michigan” (1995) “Discovery of Entomophaga maimaiga in North American gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar” (1990) Scientists:
Andrew "Sandy" Liebhold, Research Entomologist, Northern Research Station, Morgantown, West Virginia David Smitley, Professor, Michigan State University, Department of Entomology, East Lansing, Michigan Produced by the USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station.
 
Want more information? Visit us at: www.nrs.fs.fed.us/podcast/1/3/
 
Any questions? Connect with us on Twitter!

Insect biological control comes in all shapes and sizes — parasitoids, predators, or pathogens. So, what happens when neither a parasitoid nor a predator are feasible? Well, sometimes we have to turn away from using insects to attack insect pests, and turn to using an even smaller organism, something microscopic: a pathogen — in this case a fungus. Related Research:
“Introduction and Establishment of Entomophaga maimaiga, a Fungal Pathogen of Gypsy Moth in Michigan” (1995) “Discovery of Entomophaga maimaiga in North American gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar” (1990) Scientists:
Andrew "Sandy" Liebhold, Research Entomologist, Northern Research Station, Morgantown, West Virginia David Smitley, Professor, Michigan State University, Department of Entomology, East Lansing, Michigan Produced by the USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station.
 
Want more information? Visit us at: www.nrs.fs.fed.us/podcast/1/3/
 
Any questions? Connect with us on Twitter!

18 min