33 episodes

Hi there, I'm your host Nabeel Azeez. Join me and my guests as we give you practical advice on how to develop yourself and reach your potential mentally, physically, and spiritually. New episodes every week.

Becoming the Alpha Muslim Nabeel Azeez

    • Society & Culture
    • 3.6 • 37 Ratings

Hi there, I'm your host Nabeel Azeez. Join me and my guests as we give you practical advice on how to develop yourself and reach your potential mentally, physically, and spiritually. New episodes every week.

    Boys in the Cave or BOYS CAVING IN?

    Boys in the Cave or BOYS CAVING IN?

    The Boys In The Cave podcast recently interviewed Becoming The Alpha Muslim. After publishing the episode, they faced criticism and pressure from SJW Muslims online. They caved to the pressure and took down the episode. Here is the full, unedited interview for your listening pleasure. 
    Full show notes are available here: http://bit.ly/boysinthecave

    • 1 hr 39 min
    Muslimah Serial Entrepreneur Hodan Ibrahim on Minority Business Owners, Self-Worth, Feminism, Polygyny, and More

    Muslimah Serial Entrepreneur Hodan Ibrahim on Minority Business Owners, Self-Worth, Feminism, Polygyny, and More

    I first came across Hodan Ibrahim in 2016, when she basically dropped everything she was doing in Canada and moved to Dubai to organize and host M-Powered Summit.
    This was a first-of-its-kind conference on Muslim startups and entrepreneurship.
    I ended up interviewing her and her co-founder for Ilmfeed, and also did writeups of the event.
    I haven't seen one like it, since.
    She hosted another, similar conference in Malaysia then next year, and has since moved on to bigger and better things.
    You see, Hodan is a serial entrepreneur.
    So the easiest thing that I did, and the hardest thing that I did, was becoming an entrepreneur. Um, it's, it's who I am. And I started out by failing a bunch of times and having little digital startups. The first company that worked out for me was a digital marketing agency that I had, um, and Alhamdulillah, after like three months. I went full-time on that. Being an entrepreneur is "cool" now...every other Instagram profile has the title splashed across their bio.
    But Hodan was in the entrepreneurship Game long before it was even a thing.
    As a first-generation, Somali-Canadian immigrant Muslim (her family fled because of the war,) she ticked multiple minority status boxes...
    And frequently found herself the only black woman in a room full of white men.
    There was not a single person of color in any of these rooms that could understand my perspective...I remember one incident where I went to CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.) This was the first event that I ever did, in Ottawa, and it was about supporting entrepreneurs of color. And I went and got an interview with the CBC, and they're just like, "Why does it matter if an entrepreneur is a person of color?...why can't you just learn from all types of entrepreneurs? Why don't you have white entrepreneurs?" None of this stopped her.
    What's interesting to me is how she didn't let her hamster run wild and create a narrative of victimhood (Feminism, Patriarchy, Toxic Masculinity, yadda yadda yadda.)
    She just did what she had to do to get where she needed to go.
    And it was her faith that aided her.
    In this episode of the Becoming the Alpha Muslim podcast, Hodan and I talk about:
    Being a minority business owner as a first generation Somali-Canadian immigrant black Muslimah The historical context behind attitudes toward Muslim women today Feminism (and why Muslim women don't need it) How Muslim women can develop their self-worth and happiness Why she's pro-polygyny and thinks its the best relationship arrangement for her personality and lifestyle And a bunch of other topics For complete show notes, visit our blog:
    https://becomingthealphamuslim.com/muslimah-serial-entrepreneur-hodan-ibrahim

    • 1 hr 40 min
    Muslim Men in Journalism: The World's Last Hope Against Fake News

    Muslim Men in Journalism: The World's Last Hope Against Fake News

    Late last year, I had the chance to sit down to talk to Hussein Kesvani about his work as a Muslim journalist. 

    A lot happened between then and now that led to me not publishing this podcast episode soon after I recorded it. 

    I figure now's as good a time as any.

    Hussein Kesvani is the UK/Europe editor for Mel Magazine, a publication ostensibly about men and masculinity (though I would argue it's perpetuating modern degeneracy and promoting men being Soyboys.)

    This is most certainly a black mark against Hussein, who is otherwise a fine fellow and an accomplished, non-hacky journalist. 

    He's also written for Buzzfeed, Vice, The Independent, The Guardian, The New Statesman, The Shortlist, and Refinery29. 

    He's a co-host of the No Country For Brown Men Podcast and also the Trash Future podcast.

    Here's what we talked about during our short chat:

    The relationship between a writer and his editor, and why journalists publish pieces that can seem "editorialized" [4:55] What journalists and copywriters have in common when writing about "subjects" and clients [8:42] The challenge of writing on topics involving Muslims in a non-Muslim publication [13:05] How BAME (Black, Asian, and Minority Ethnic) people can get their foot in the door of fast-changing world of modern journalism [17:20] Where does Hussein place crowd-funded, independent citizen journalists like Mike Cernovich, Tim Pool, and Lauren Southern in the ecosystem of journalism as a whole [23:58] How the definition of "journalism" has changed in recent years [27:18] On the journalistic value of what many citizen journalists think passes for journalism [30:09] Do mainstream media publications have a responsibility to be impartial and objective? [35:26] How can Muslim men get their start in journalism? Hussein gives us practical advice. (Hint: copywriting is an important skill) [39:56]

    • 49 min
    Trump: Year 1 - The Alt-Bro Perspective (feat. Surprise Guest)

    Trump: Year 1 - The Alt-Bro Perspective (feat. Surprise Guest)

    It's a little after one year since Donald J Trump was inaugurated as the 45th President of the United States of America.
    In this episode, I'm joined by a surprise guest (hint: he's visiting from Chicago) as we talk about Trump's first year as president, the #metoo movement, Hollywood, and accountability. 
    Show Notes I reveal our surprise guest [01:19] The luxuries of living in a Muslim country only a Muslim can truly appreciated [02:00] The one unique trait of Dubai making it the #1 destination for Muslims in the West who want to migrate to a Muslim country [04:00] Reclaiming the Alt-Bro…from pejorative to positive [05:30] The fundamental error Muslim men make when defining masculinity that makes them deficient in their manhood [09:18] Who decides the worth and quality of a man? [11:48] The two core attributes of men that, when devalued, lead to a complete breakdown in society [14:00] Trumpian communication in context…what the hell is he saying? [15:50] So, how did Trump’s first year go? What did he achieve? Where did he fail? How are people reacting to it? [17:00] When you frame Trump’s policy-making this way it all makes sense (and the two books where he tells you, “this is what I’m doing”) [24:25] The true meaning of the #metoo movement almost no one will admit [28:10] How many da’ees and shuyukh are #metoo victims? [31:30] The double standard and faulty logic of women’s “empowerment” [32:40] The one natural trait women should embrace to get the best out of the men in their lives [35:18] A perfect, very recent example of double standards in action - Asmi Fathelbab and Linda Sarsour [36:25] A disturbing trend in the behavior of some American da’ees and shuyukh, even though they have trained extensively in our Sacred Tradition [45:20] Muru’ah - propriety; the type of permissible behavior that is allowed for different ranks of men, and what kind of behavior violates muru’ah [49:00] The one solution to the current situation of the Ummah that most Muslims will dismiss [52:10] Our guest gives out some final parting advice [55:20]  

    • 59 min
    How to Network like a Pro (feat. Jay Campbell)

    How to Network like a Pro (feat. Jay Campbell)

    Every Muslim man needs to learn how to network in a way that is natural and doesn't seem fake. The key here is to not BE fake. To genuinely be interested in people and want to invest in the relationship.
    Today, I'm talking to Jay Campbell, a repeat guest on the Becoming the Alpha Muslim podcast. Jay is one of the best natural networkers I have ever seen, and a master at making feel important and appreciated.
    People don't remember what you said. They remember how you made them feel.
    During the discussion, you're going to hear us talk about:
    How to introduce yourself to strangers and what to say to make them feel comfortable How to stay present and give your conversation partner the attention he deserves How to look for areas of commonality and mutual interest How to proceed past the initial interaction to create a deeper relationship How to maintain contact with a large network and keep relationships warm And a few other related topics For complete show notes, visit: http://becomingthealphamuslim.com/how-to-network-like-a-pro

    • 1 hr 11 min
    How to Develop Your Personality to Become a More Attractive Husband

    How to Develop Your Personality to Become a More Attractive Husband

    My guest this episode is dating and relationship coach, Pat Stedman.
    This is his second appearance on the show.
    I invited him on to talk to me about how married Muslim men can develop their personalities to become more attractive and sexually desirable to their wives.
    This was a very organic discussion, where we both bounced ideas off each other and developed each other’s arguments.
    Show Notes: [00:05] This episode of the Becoming the Alpha Muslim podcast was brought to you by halal bedroom dot com. For a limited time, buy-one-get-one-free offer on your first order. Click here to buy now. [02:50] Are millennials and generation Z creating culture or re-creating monoculture? Hipsters in the 5 boroughs in New York are exactly the same as hipsters in Dubai [04:50] The cultural cognitive dissonance of the West [06:30] The three pillars of attraction - pre-selection, persona, and personality - can be thought of as marketing, sales, and product
    Pre-selection - social status and physical appearance Persona - masculinity and social skills (Game) Personality - what do you have to offer as a person [09:10] Men who have great relationships are strong in at least two and good in one [10:15] You can also think of the three pillars in evolutionary terms
    environmental factors (pre-selection) - what types of males are attractive in a society behavioral factors(persona) - how these males behave with the opposite sex psychological factors (personality) - how they maintain the relationships long-term via relationship dynamics [12:30] Pre-selection and persona will get a man up to closing the deal. Personality is what maintains the relationship. [13:20] The example of Pick-up Artists. They are very capable of getting a girl’s attention in the beginning but have a hard time holding it afterwards. [17:10] There are two dimensions of personality. Psychological growth and maturity, and chemistry (desire) and compatibility (comfort). [22:35] The attractiveness of women vs their emotional maturity.
    The younger girls (late teens to early 20s) who men are attracted to are basic bitches. The older women (late 20s to early 30s) are the ones bringing more to the relationship than their box. The sexual marketplace is so inefficient because there are two marketplaces operating in parallel - the physical and the psychological [29:00] The similarities between Muslims and Ahlul Kitab - we’re all having premarital sex and “oral and anal don’t count”. [32:00] Marriage is a massive vehicle for psychological growth. Couples who get married young and stick together past the difficult years stay married for a very long time and have the best relationships. They make each other grow together. [36:30] The Western tradition vs the Eastern tradition: the individual is the smallest unit of society vs. the family is the smallest unit of society [37:55] Marriage is 50% of your religion. Marriage accounts for so much of your spiritual growth and exercise of many of Islam’s religious duties. [40:10] When you’re with someone, a mirror is held up to you. Our romantic desire for someone and being bound to them, forces us to work on ourselves and become better people. [42:00] How Nabeel met and married his wife [44:20] How long it takes to mature in a marriage and step into your role as the patriarch [46:20] Men without children are man-children and women without children are self-absorbed narcissists [47:20] You’re never truly ready to get married or have children. Allah provides sustenance for each person. My upward mobility strategy: get more wives and have more kids. [49:50] Hypergamy and cognitive dissonance in women. [51:40] Islam places a cost of doing business on both genders attempting to fully realize their respective sexual strategies (hypergamy and plate-spinning). [54:30] Misconceptions about Islam and polygynous societies, “there are all these unmarried men without sexual access to women”. [57:10] Pat impresses us with his kno

    • 1 hr 49 min

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5
37 Ratings

37 Ratings

SDuhan ,

It is just ok

Yes, there are some great topics. However, the presentation is simply boring on the host’s part. Brother, please up the game.

Vincent Mandel ,

mashAllah

Masculinty and islamic values, we need this is a world full of alphabet people and declinging marrige rate and incerasing divorce rate. The end is near ikwaan, we need to stay focused and grounded in reality.

Miss fix it ,

Don’t waste your time.

I regret wasting my time listening to this. It’s ignorant, judgmental, and vulgar.

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