300 episodes

This is a show about early American history. Awarded Best History Podcast by the Academy of Podcasters in 2017, it’s for people who love history and for those who want to know more about the historical people and events that have impacted and shaped our present-day world.

Each episode features conversations with professional historians who help shed light on important people and events in early American history. It is produced by the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture.

Ben Franklin's World Liz Covart

    • History
    • 4.5 • 1.1K Ratings

This is a show about early American history. Awarded Best History Podcast by the Academy of Podcasters in 2017, it’s for people who love history and for those who want to know more about the historical people and events that have impacted and shaped our present-day world.

Each episode features conversations with professional historians who help shed light on important people and events in early American history. It is produced by the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture.

    Listener Q&A: The Early History of the United States Congress

    Listener Q&A: The Early History of the United States Congress

    This special bonus episode previews the Ben Franklin's World Subscription program and its monthly bonus episode for program subscribers.

    In this bonus episode, Historian of the United States House of Representatives Matt Wasniewski and Historical Publications Specialist Terrance Rucker answer your questions about the early history of the United States Congress.

    Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/202

    • 18 min
    Elections in Early America: Presidential Elections & the Electoral College

    Elections in Early America: Presidential Elections & the Electoral College

    It took delegates to the Constitutional Convention in 1787 nearly four months to settle on the method for selecting the President. The system they came up with called for indirect election; the states would select electors who would then cast votes for President & Vice President. Today we call these electors the Electoral College.

    In this final episode of our Elections in Early America series, we explore the origins and early development of the Electoral College.

    • 1 hr 1 min
    Elections in Early America: Native Sovereignty

    Elections in Early America: Native Sovereignty

    Who is American democracy for and who could participate in early American democracy?

    Women and African Americans were often barred from voting in colonial and early republic elections. But what about Native Americans? Could Native Americans participate in early American democracy?

    Julie Reed and Kathleen DuVal join us to investigate how the sovereignty of native nations fits within the sovereignty of the United States and its democracy.

    • 56 min
    Elections in Early America: Elections & Voting in the Early Republic

    Elections in Early America: Elections & Voting in the Early Republic

    Independence provided the former British American colonists the opportunity to create a new, more democratic government than they had lived under before the American Revolution.

    What did this new American government look like? Who could participate in this new American democracy? And what was it like to participate in this new democracy?

    Scholars Terrance Rucker and Marcela Miccuci join us to investigate the first federal elections in the United States and who could vote in early U.S. elections.

    • 1 hr 10 min
    Elections in Early America: Democracy & Voting in British North America

    Elections in Early America: Democracy & Voting in British North America

    The British North American colonies formed some of the most democratic governments in the world. But that doesn't mean that all early Americans were treated equally or allowed to participate in representative government.
    So who could vote in Early America? Who could participate in representative government?
    Historians James Kloppenberg, the Charles Warren Professor of History at Harvard University, and Amy Watson, an Assistant Professor of History at the University of Alabama, Birmingham, help us explore who democracy was meant for and how those who lived in colonial British America understood and practiced representative government. 
    Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/284


    Join Ben Franklin's World!
    Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears!

    Sponsor Links
    Omohundro Institute OI Reader Election Series Resource Guide The Ben Franklin's World Shop
    Complementary Episodes
    Episode 038: Carolyn Harris, Magna Carta Episode 143: Michael Klarman, The Making of the United States Constitution Episode 243: Joseph Adelman, Revolutionary Print Networks Episode 250: Virginia, 1619 Episode 255: Martha Jones, Birthright Citizens  

    Listen!
    Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App
    Helpful Links
    Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

    • 51 min
    A Brief History of the United States Supreme Court

    A Brief History of the United States Supreme Court

    The death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has caused debate about whether the President should appoint a new justice to fill her seat and, if he does appoint someone, whether the Senate should vote on the President’s nomination before the election.

    This short bonus episode offers a brief history of the Supreme Court and how it functions within the United States government. Our guest for this episode is Mary Sarah Bilder, the Founders Professor of Law at Boston College.

    • 10 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
1.1K Ratings

1.1K Ratings

Clyles89 ,

Love the show but one thing...

I love the show. I’ve listened to about 90% of it. It’s one of the best history podcasts I’ve ever listened to. My only issue is that in some of the episodes Liz is incredibly loud. I mean extremely loud. Idk. It could be an audio issue but it’s like that on all my audio devices. And I have pretty good stuff. It sounds like she yelling into mic. 🤷🏾‍♀️

mica1960 ,

Gender and Enslavement Podcasts Predominate

Some good podcasts here mixed in with a disproportionate emphasis on slavery, gender, and social justice centric topics. After awhile it gets old and a little preachy with its general negative perspective on our nation’s early history.

4636457&39 ,

Questionable at best...

Just listened to the Acadian diaspora. As I have done a lot of family genealogy and study, I have come to the conclusion that the host and author that was interviewed were very unknowing of the major cause as to why the Acadians were evicted, the numerous deaths in the slave ships due to disease and shipwrecks, and where these people eventually ended up. They never mentioned the Acadians that found their way to Northern Maine or the ships that brought hundreds or thousands to British prisons. Or the terrible conditions when they were sent to France after the war was over. This is a story of people who just wanted to be left alone to worship their own way, toughness, and almost genocide. The author makes it seem like a walk in the park. Also, why would you interview a professor from BYU? Probably should have talked to someone who’s family was involved in the “grand derangement”. There are many knowledgeable people in actual Acadia that know more than this idiot. If you want to read a good book that tells the real story in historical fiction, read “the scattered” by richard holledge. I found that much more realistic than this guys version. Also I hope the other stories on this podcast are better researched and the guests better vetted.-an Acadian

Top Podcasts In History

Listeners Also Subscribed To