100 episodes

In which the CenterForLit staff embarks on a quest to discover the Great Ideas of literature in books of every description: ancient classics to fresh bestsellers; epic poems to bedtime stories. This podcast is a production of The Center for Literary Education and is a reading companion for teachers, homeschoolers, and readers of all stripes.

BiblioFiles: A CenterForLit Podcast about Great Books, Great Ideas, and the Great Conversation The CenterForLit Podcast Network

    • Books
    • 4.9 • 209 Ratings

In which the CenterForLit staff embarks on a quest to discover the Great Ideas of literature in books of every description: ancient classics to fresh bestsellers; epic poems to bedtime stories. This podcast is a production of The Center for Literary Education and is a reading companion for teachers, homeschoolers, and readers of all stripes.

    BiblioFiles #95: Memento Mori

    BiblioFiles #95: Memento Mori

    The CenterForLit crew cheerfully tackles the problem of their own mortality.

    Shop BiblioFiles: www.centerforlit.com/the-bibliofiles-shop

    Referenced Works:
    – The Death of Ivan Ilyich by Leo Tolstoy
    – “The Uncourageous Violet” by Humbert Wolfe
    – Antigone by Sophocles
    – The Plague by Albert Camus
    – Letting Swift River Go by Jane Yolen
    – Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt
    – A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway
    – The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien
    – The Last Battle by C.S. Lewis
    – Between Noon and Three by Robert Farrar Capon
    – “Death, be not proud” or Sonnet X by John Donne

    We love hearing your questions and comments! You can contact us by emailing adam@centerforlit.com, or you can visit our website www.centerforlit.com to find even more ways to participate in the conversation.

    BiblioFiles #94: Should Literary Criticism Uncover Hidden Meaning?

    BiblioFiles #94: Should Literary Criticism Uncover Hidden Meaning?

    In some ways, literature is meant to communicate implicitly and unconsciously. Does literary criticism then ruin the reading experience by trying to make that meaning explicit? The CenterForLit crew tackles this question by turning to Michael Ward’s defense of Planet Narnia, one of the greatest literary discoveries in recent memory.
    Referenced Works:
    – Planet Narnia by Michael Ward
    – An Experiment in Criticism by C.S. Lewis
    – Tending the Heart of Virtue by Vigen Guroian

    We love hearing your questions and comments! You can contact us by emailing adam@centerforlit.com, or you can visit our website www.centerforlit.com to find even more ways to participate in the conversation.

    BiblioFiles #93: The Search for Meaning in Camus's The Plague (What Are We Reading?)

    BiblioFiles #93: The Search for Meaning in Camus's The Plague (What Are We Reading?)

    Everyone abandons Adam and Emily in the office, but they take advantage of the time by sitting down for another “What Are We Reading?” episode of BiblioFiles. Challenged to read Camus’s The Plague due to the obvious relevance of the subject matter, Adam shares his first experience with the French absurdist and talks about how this work might speak to current circumstances.

    Referenced Works:
    – The Plague by Albert Camus
    – Albert Camus 1957 Nobel Prize Banquet Speech
    – The Brother’s Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky

    We love hearing your questions and comments! You can contact us by emailing adam@centerforlit.com, or you can visit our website www.centerforlit.com to find even more ways to participate in the conversation.

    BiblioFiles #92: Literary History with Dr. Sam Negus

    BiblioFiles #92: Literary History with Dr. Sam Negus

    Are we allowed to talk about history on a literature podcast?? We’re speaking with historian Dr. Samuel Negus to find out and to discuss the similarities between the two disciplines. What should the study of history look like? Why do we study it at all? We’re talking about all this and more, but be sure to stick around until the end of the podcast for a very special announcement from CenterForLit!
    Learn more about Dr. Negus’s classes here!
    Referenced Works:
    – The Storykeepers (1995-1997), Shepherd Films
    – Farenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
    – The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire by Edward Gibbon
    – Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era by James McPherson
    – Imagined Communities by Benedict Anderson
    – Britons: Forging the Nation 1707-1837 by Linda Colley
    – Harry Potter read by Jim Dale
    – 1776 by David McCullough
    – Reflections on the Revolution in France by Edmund Burke
    – Hamlet by William Shakespeare
    – Mr. Churchill’s Profession: Statesman, Orator, Writer by Peter Clark
    – Gone with the Wind (1940), directed by Victor Fleming
    – The Civil War (1990), directed by Ken Burns
    – Two Years Before the Mast by Richard Henry Dana Jr.

    We love hearing your questions and comments! You can contact us by emailing adam@centerforlit.com, or you can visit our website www.centerforlit.com to find even more ways to participate in the conversation.

    How to Eat an Elephant: Trailer

    How to Eat an Elephant: Trailer

    Coming August 5, 2020…
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    BiblioFiles #91: Cancel Culture and the Great Books

    BiblioFiles #91: Cancel Culture and the Great Books

    As cultural expectations evolve, how do we handle socially objectionable content in the world of literature? How do we approach the artwork if we find the author offensive? How do we elevate what is good and true without tearing down the tradition? In this episode of BiblioFiles, the team talks through Cancel Culture’s effects, origins, and antidotes.
    Referenced Works:
    – “American Dirt: 'Cancel culture' embraces book burning in the digital age” by Christian Toto
    – Hamilton, composed by Lin-Manuel Miranda
    – Areopagitica by John Milton
    – One Day of the Life in Ivan Denisovich by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
    – Go Set a Watchman and To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

    We love hearing your questions and comments! You can contact us by emailing adam@centerforlit.com, or you can visit our website www.centerforlit.com to find even more ways to participate in the conversation.

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
209 Ratings

209 Ratings

Djnos1978 ,

Loving it!

I’m new to this podcast but I am so enjoying it. Exceptional conversations!

66TRC ,

Very good, but...

Very Good program, overall. Have listened to many episodes, and enjoyed them.
But just now I had to turn off “cancel culture and the Great Books” episode, because I feared for some family members’ spines by bending WAY over backwards to say “both sides of the aisle” are responsible.

How many on the Right have cancelled someone? Who on the Right will cancel you? Who on the Right do you fear? Of course the Right has its sins; but cancelling someone and thereby destroying their livelihood isn’t one of them.
Come on. This process is a front and center reason that our country is in such trouble. Thomas
PS: Missy spoke “Truth” most often

InterpretingThroughPhotos ,

Expert and growth

Thank you for sharing your expertise as well as your own personal growth! You all are encouraging!

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