67 episodes

Bill is a casual movie goer; Ted is a movie fanatic. They pick a movie (usually Ted does this), watch it, and then talk about it. The result is a free-wheeling conversation about film, culture, philosophy, theology, zombies, dystopia, politics, myth, legend, and whatever else the film suggests. Listeners are encouraged to watch the movies themselves as part of the conversation.

Bill and Ted Watch Movies Bill Cwirla and Ted Giese

    • TV & Film
    • 5.0 • 25 Ratings

Bill is a casual movie goer; Ted is a movie fanatic. They pick a movie (usually Ted does this), watch it, and then talk about it. The result is a free-wheeling conversation about film, culture, philosophy, theology, zombies, dystopia, politics, myth, legend, and whatever else the film suggests. Listeners are encouraged to watch the movies themselves as part of the conversation.

    Public Service Announcement

    Public Service Announcement

    A quick update about some upcoming changes at Bill and Ted Watch Movies. Hiatus and a big move, plus some technical stuff: if you’re wondering where the film clip is from in the announcement it’s from Alan Metter’s 1988 Richard Pryor comedy “Moving.”

    • 3 min
    Episode 65 – TRON: Legacy (2010)

    Episode 65 – TRON: Legacy (2010)

    Bill and Ted discuss Joseph Kosinski’s 2010 “TRON Legacy” the action packed follow up to Steven Lisberger’s 1982 groundbreaking sci-fi cult classic TRON. Computer programmer, Kevin Flynn (Jeff Bridges), long trapped within his own digital creation is forced into action when his son Sam (Garrett Hedlund) surprisingly arrives within The Grid. Together father and son must assist the “isomorphic algorithm” Quorra (Olivia Wilde) as Kevin Flynn’s fallen programme Clu (Jeff Bridges) plots to gain complete control of The Grid and access to the biological world. Less futurist manifesto and more of a contemplative reassessment of digital life Kosinski’s TRON finds its focus digging into relationships both broken and restored. Religious themes of incarnation and forgiveness abound alongside stunning visuals and a pulsing inventive score by the award winning French Electric Dance Music duo Daft Punk.















    If you enjoyed this film, you may also like these Ted’s Picks: TRON (1982), Dark City (1998), Oblivion (2013)

    • 1 hr 36 min
    Episode 64 – Metropolis (1927)

    Episode 64 – Metropolis (1927)

    Bill and Ted discuss Fritz Lang’s 1927 landmark silent science-fiction drama “Metropolis” where utopia collides with dystopia and the head of the planner desperately needs a mediator for the hand of the worker. Gustav Fröhlich stars as Freder, the privileged son of Johann Fredersen (Alfred Abel), the technocratic designer and overlord of the futuristic city Metropolis who falls in the love with Maria (Brigitte Helm), a kind-hearted woman and the spiritual leader of the workers. Maria and Freder’s dream of a better tomorrow for the whole of Metropolis meets resistance in the face of a mad-scientist bent on revenge. Metropolis is a kind of masterclass blueprint for nearly a century of epic world-building cinema. At every turn there is some archetypical concept, theme, character, visual image, or moment that viewers will recognize from a multitude of films. With its mix of politics, religion, science-fiction, action, futurism, and romance, Lang’s Metropolis is a highly influential film that has left an indelible imprint on generations of film makers.   







    If you enjoyed this film, you may also like these Ted’s Picks: Blade Runner (1982), Batman (1989), The Matrix (1999)

    • 1 hr 24 min
    Episode 63 – TRON (1982)

    Episode 63 – TRON (1982)

    Bill and Ted discuss Steven Lisberger’s 1982 boundary pushing Sci-Fi film “TRON,” a futurist film made at the dawn of the personal computer and the explosion of the video game market. Lisberger envisions a world where analogue collides with digital in a struggle over what is real and what is programmed. Jeff Bridges stars as computer programmer Kevin Flynn, who finds himself “incarnated” inside a computer in a struggle against the Master Control Program and his formidable minion Sark (David Warner) as they plot to dominate the real world. Flynn joins the security programme TRON (Bruce Boxleitner) in the fight against the MCP’s tyranny and expanding dystopia. Filled with eye-popping images, this innovative, ambitious, and stylish film took tremendous technical risks unlocking new avenues for the filmmakers that followed.















    If you enjoyed this film, you may also like these Ted’s Picks: Metropolis (1927), The Wizard of Oz (1939), The Last Starfighter (1984)

    • 1 hr 26 min
    Episode 62 – Early Silent Short Films

    Episode 62 – Early Silent Short Films

    Bill & Ted discuss early silent short films from the dawn of film making: Thomas Edison’s “The Kiss,” (1896); Louis Lumière’s proto cinéma vérité film “The Arrival of the Train,” (1896); Georges Méliès’ iconic Jules-Verne’s-esque sci-fi film “A Trip to the Moon,” (1902); Edwin S. Porter’s Western “The Great Train Robbery,” (1903); D.W. Griffith’s Rom-Com Tragedy “The Making of a Man,” (1911); Charlie Chaplin’s Action Comedy “The Tramp,” (1915); Man Ray’s Experimental film “The Return to Reason,” (1923); and Luis Buñuel’s  Surrealist film with painter Salvador Dali, “Un Chien Andalou,” (1929).  







    If you enjoyed this film, you may also like these Ted’s Picks: Robert J. Flaherty’s “Nanook of the North” (1922), Harold Lloyd’s “Safety Last” (1923), Luis Buñuel’s “L’Age D’Or” (1930)

    • 1 hr 49 min
    Episode 61 – Ferris Bueller’s Day Off (1986)

    Episode 61 – Ferris Bueller’s Day Off (1986)

    Bill & Ted discuss “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off” – John Hughes’ 1986 classic teen comedy. Fast-talking high school senior Ferris Bueller (Matthew Broderick), his neurotic best friend Cameron Frye (Alan Ruck), and carefree girlfriend Sloane Peterson (Mia Sara) put Ferris’ “Life moves pretty fast. If you don’t stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it” philosophy into action, ditching school for a whirlwind fun-filled tour of their hometown of Chicago. Narrowly evading Ferris’ kind but clueless parents and suspicious sister Jeanie (Jennifer Grey) the trio do their best to help the morose Cameron gain some much needed perspective. Peppering his film with poignant moments, Hughes also gives audiences plenty of pratfall slapstick humour as high school principle, Ed Rooney (Jeffrey Jones), attempting to catch Ferris, walks into an escalating series of comeuppances.







    If you enjoyed this film, you may also like these Ted’s Picks: Sixteen Candles (1984), The Breakfast Club (1985), Don’t You Forget About Me (2009)

    • 1 hr 26 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
25 Ratings

25 Ratings

JB112358 ,

Great Treasure of Movies

Thanks to this podcast I have learned about movies that I have never experiences. I use the movie reviews as guides for what movies I watch. This is a masterclass in how to watch movies as a Christian and pull out the major themes that can serve as chatechical moments for friends and family.

Mk107 ,

Very entertaining movie reviews.

Bill and Ted have great chemistry and both make interesting points I hadn’t thought about.
Highly Recommend the Tree of life episodes.
Keep up the Good Work!

EDOpera ,

Fun Stuff!

I’m having a blast listening! Better than National Radio people I have heard. I miss good talk radio and podcasts like yours are important to me now!

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