48 episodes

Brief and concise historical episodes of the African-American experience. Narrated by renowned historian, Henry Louis Gates Jr. and executive produced by Robert F. Smith.

Black History in Two Minutes Be Woke Presents...

    • History
    • 4.7, 90 Ratings

Brief and concise historical episodes of the African-American experience. Narrated by renowned historian, Henry Louis Gates Jr. and executive produced by Robert F. Smith.

    • video
    Land: Giving Rise to the Famous Phrase 40 Acres & a Mule

    Land: Giving Rise to the Famous Phrase 40 Acres & a Mule

    Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so)

    As the Union declared victory over the Confederacy, post-Civil War life seemed to be off to a good start for freed slaves. William Tecumseh Sherman, a former Union general, sat with 20 black ministers to develop a plan to remedy the harsh treatment of black people.

    The phrase “40 acres and a mule” — a promise to former slaves — would be hatched from this meeting. Unfortunately, President Andrew Johnson would renege on this promise and many families never saw this promise come to fruition. While land ownership would have been a step in the right direction, negotiations robbed black families of an opportunity to invest in an economic future with.

    In this episode of Black History In Two Minutes or So hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr., with additional commentary from Evelynn Hammonds of Harvard University and Farah Griffin of Columbia University, we uncover the turbulent history of land ownership and the challenges black people faced in America.

    Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series.

    If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/



    Archival Materials Courtesy of:

    • Alamy Image

    • Everett Collection, Inc.

    • Getty Images

    • Library of Congress



    Executive Producers:

    • Robert F. Smith

    • Henry Louis Gates Jr.

    • Dyllan McGee

    • Deon Taylor



    Produced by:

    • William Ventura

    • Romilla Karnick



    Music By:

    • Oovra Music



    Be Woke presents is brought to you by Robert F. Smith and Deon Taylor.

    Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook

    Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram

    Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel

    ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts.



    Distributed by aone.la

    Powered by hyperengine.ai

    • 2 min
    • video
    The Red Summer

    The Red Summer

    Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so)

    The events unfolding across the United States today in the wake of the brutal murder of George Floyd, are an eerie repetition of events that marred the history of race relations in this country almost exactly a century ago.

    The year was 1919, and African American soldiers who came home from the Great War in Europe with hopes that serving their country at last would entitle them to the rights of equal citizenship, found themselves on the lethal end of an outbreak of racial violence so horrific that the civil rights leader James Weldon Johnson called it The Red Summer.

    In this episode of Black History in Two Minutes (or so) hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr. — with additional commentary from David Levering Lewis of New York University, Peniel Joseph of the University of Texas and Farah Griffin of Columbia University — we explore some of the underlying factors that ignited one of the most violent race riots in our country’s history.

    Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series.

    If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/



    • Archival Materials Courtesy of:

    • Arkansas State Archives

    • Butler Center for Arkansas Studies, Central Arkansas Library System

    • Everett Collection, Inc

    • Getty Images

    • Library of Congress

    • National Archives and Records Administration

    • New York Public Library

    • Solomon Sir Jones Films. Yale Collection of Western Americana, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library

    • University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, Longview Public Library



    Additional Footage Courtesy of:

    • Inkwell Films, Kunhardt & WNET



    Executive Producers:

    • Robert F. Smith

    • Henry Louis Gates Jr.

    • Dyllan McGee

    • Deon Taylor



    Produced by:

    • William Ventura

    • Romilla Karnick



    Music By:

    • Oovra Music



    Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series.

    Be Woke presents is brought to you by Robert F. Smith and Deon Taylor.

    Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook

    Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram

    Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel

    ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts.



    Distributed by aone.la

    Powered by hyperengine.ai

    • 5 min
    • video
    Lynching

    Lynching

    Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so)

    Lynching was an action used to terrorize the black community for generations, with the first known public display of this injustice taking place in Madison, Mississippi in 1835.

    Investigative journalist like Ida B. Wells stood on the front lines, documenting and reporting the continued use of lynchings in society. Wells’ objective was to counter the belief that lynching was a valid means of justice. Eventually, the NAACP made it a part of its mission to see to it that lynching was put to an end. In 2018, after more than two hundred failed attempts, the United States Congress finally passed a bill making the act of lynching a hate crime.

    In this episode of Black History In Two Minutes or So hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr. — with additional commentary from Farah Griffin of Columbia University and Bryan Stevenson, the Executive Director of Equal Justice Initiative — we take a deeper look at the long journey of a violent and public spectacle that was used to taunt and terrorize black communities for centuries.

    Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series.

    If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/



    Archival Materials Courtesy of:

    • Alamy Images

    • Associated Press

    • C-SPAN

    • Everett Collection, Inc.

    • Getty Images

    • Library of Congress

    • Shutterstock



    Additional Archival by:

    • Jet



    Executive Producers:

    • Robert F. Smith

    • Henry Louis Gates Jr.

    • Dyllan McGee

    • Deon Taylor



    Produced by:

    • William Ventura

    • Romilla Karnick



    Music By:

    • Oovra Music



    Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook

    Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram

    Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel

    ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts.



    Distributed by aone.la

    Powered by hyperengine.ai

    • 3 min
    • video
    John Lewis: The Fight for the Right to Vote

    John Lewis: The Fight for the Right to Vote

    Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so)

    In 1963, John Lewis’ excitement would meet his life’s purpose when he joined the Civil Rights Movement. He is now known as one of the greatest activists and change fighters to enter the arena of social and racial justice reform.

    Lewis became one of the “Big Six” leaders of the Civil Rights movement and helped organized demonstrations and sit-ins, all while playing an active role in the March on Washington. His efforts would reach new heights after the march in Selma, Alabama lead to President Lyndon B. Johnson passing the Voting Rights Act in 1965.

    In this episode of Black History In Two Minutes or So hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr., with additional commentary from Khalil Muhammad of Harvard University, Hasan Jeffries of Ohio State University, and Civil Rights Activist Vernon Jordan, we salute a freedom fighter whose message and activism can still be heard loud and clear to this day.

    Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series.

    If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/



    Archival Materials Courtesy of:

    • Alamy Images

    • Getty Images

    • LBJ Presidential Library

    • National Archives and Records Administration

    • Shutterstock



    Executive Producers:

    • Robert F. Smith

    • Henry Louis Gates Jr.

    • Dyllan McGee

    • Deon Taylor



    Produced by:

    • William Ventura

    • Romilla Karnick



    Music By:

    • Oovra Music



    Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook

    Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram

    Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel

    ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts.



    Distributed by aone.la

    Powered by hyperengine.ai

    • 3 min
    • video
    The Black Press: From Freedom’s Journal to The Crisis, Ebony & Jet

    The Black Press: From Freedom’s Journal to The Crisis, Ebony & Jet

    Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so)

    White publications have sought to represent all voices in America since it’s discovery. But, in 1827, Samuel Cornish and John Russwurm joined forces and created the Freedom’s Journal. This publication created a space for black journalists to speak on issues relevant to black people.

    From there, we would see other noted publications, like The Colored American, enter the homes of black people across the country. The black press not only spoke on topics like racial injustice and protests, but it delivered news so powerful that it would be tied to the launch of the Civil Rights Movement. As the press grew in distribution, black issues became highlighted and black accomplishments were able to be celebrated nationwide.

    In this episode of Black History In Two Minutes or So, hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr., with additional commentary from Farah Griffin of Columbia University, Mia Bay of the University of Pennsylvania, and Paula Giddings of Smith College, we will take a look at how the black press became a pivotal part of the black experience in America.

    Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series.

    If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/



    Archival Materials Courtesy of:

    • Alamy Images

    • The Brooklyn Daily Eagle

    • The Evening Sun

    • Everett Collection, Inc.

    • Getty Images

    • Library of Congress

    • The New York Public Library

    • The New York Times

    • The Tribune



    Executive Producers:

    • Robert F. Smith

    • Henry Louis Gates Jr.

    • Dyllan McGee

    • Deon Taylor



    Produced by:

    • William Ventura

    • Romilla Karnick



    Music By:

    • Oovra Music



    Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook

    Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram

    Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel

    ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts.



    Distributed by aone.la

    Powered by hyperengine.ai

    • 3 min
    • video
    First African American Patent Holders

    First African American Patent Holders

    Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so)

    Black inventors have made significant contributions in the name of not only advancing the American brand, but by way of breaking down a system that didn’t always allow for their innovative brands to exist.

    After slavery was abolished, requests for patents rose, and black inventors were able to capitalize off their talents. From folding beds to traffic lights, African-Americans have had a long tradition of improving daily life for everyone. Thomas Jennings and Judy Reed would become the first African-American man and woman to be granted patents for their inventions.

    In this series of Black History In Two Minutes or So, hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr., with additional commentary from Evelynn Hammonds of Harvard University, let’s take a look at black patent pioneers who laid the foundation for other talented creators.

    Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series.

    If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/



    Archival Materials Courtesy of:

    • Associated Press

    • Alamy Images

    • Getty Images

    • Library of Congress

    • Queens Borough Public Library

    • United States Patent and Trademark Office



    Executive Producers:

    • Robert F. Smith

    • Henry Louis Gates Jr.

    • Dyllan McGee

    • Deon Taylor



    Produced by:

    • William Ventura

    • Romilla Karnick



    Music By:

    • Oovra Music



    Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook

    Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram

    Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel

    ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts.



    Distributed by aone.la

    Powered by hyperengine.ai

    • 3 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
90 Ratings

90 Ratings

fleurdi ,

Educational

I am definitely going to use some of these to teach in my 5th grade class. Short and a great jumping off point to a bigger conversation.

Thunderdyke ,

Great resource!

This is an excellent resource for people with shorter attention spans—the visual is very helpful for digesting the information. Thank you so much for the CC and making the information so accessible!

RaisingAdults ,

Absolutely Fabtastic

Love this podcast! I’m watching one every morning. Such important and educational content. THANK YOU.

Top Podcasts In History

Listeners Also Subscribed To