37 episodes

When business changes, it challenges us – and necessarily so. This podcast sets out to see what success looks like when innovative minds rise to new challenges and excel in the face of change. Each episode, hear true stories from the professionals, leaders, and forward-thinkers who have looked past the traditional and into the transformative as they discuss the most pressing topics in business today.

Bold stories. Future focused‪.‬ Pegasystems

    • Business
    • 5.0 • 11 Ratings

When business changes, it challenges us – and necessarily so. This podcast sets out to see what success looks like when innovative minds rise to new challenges and excel in the face of change. Each episode, hear true stories from the professionals, leaders, and forward-thinkers who have looked past the traditional and into the transformative as they discuss the most pressing topics in business today.

    Innovating operations within a skills chasm with Yael Kaufmann, Stacy Cline, and Bob Chapman

    Innovating operations within a skills chasm with Yael Kaufmann, Stacy Cline, and Bob Chapman

    Operational problems aren’t going anywhere; they’re growing. How can leaders keep loyal talent motivated when the dreaded skills gap keeps evolving? Juggling employee development and making a profit, while also doing good is no easy task. Yael Kaufmann, co-founder, and COO of LearnIn, Bob Chapman, CEO of Barry Wehmiller – a manufacturing company – and Stacy Cline, Senior Director of Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability at GoDaddy are with us to share their perspectives on how they’re facing these issues head-on. 
     
    Key Takeaways:
    [2:14] As companies look to be able to fill gaps in their talent needs, they also struggle in a lot of ways to be able to deliver on what it is they are trying to achieve.
    [2:31] We can view automation as an opportunity to give employees greater purpose by emphasizing their individual talents and sense of belonging.
    [3:20] The great opportunity of technology is to help us do more with less and then invest in actually doing more.
    [4:21] There is more seriousness for companies to take action when it comes to topics like diversity and inclusion and climate change, rather than for them to just talk about it.
    [7:29] How may our approach to reskilling be holding us back?
    [8:20] The rate at which jobs are changing from menial tasks to more interesting knowledge work is exploding. We may not need to look to outside workers, but rather give the people who are already in your organization, and have a ton of amazing knowledge, the skills they need.
    [9:24] If you want to be more inclusive and offer benefits, you have to be thinking about some of those barriers that may already be holding people back.
    [12:33] Toyota is a great example of listening to the people doing the work, instead of letting them go just to lean things out.
    [14:00] Any tech we bring into the mix has to be set up to align with our corporate social and environmental responsibilities.
    [19:33] Governance and oversight can take up a lot of resources, so pairing with a vendor who specializes in learning about your customer in a secure way is going to be a game-changer in the future.
    [19:28] You don’t need to necessarily be two steps ahead at every point in time, but having thought about it already at that point in time enables you to pull the trigger when the time is right.
    [21:24] When GoDaddy began ramping up its environmental efforts, Stacy was cataloging the environmental and social issues most important to its stakeholders. She talks about the process as a constant conversation, and one that must be able to shift as the conversation of the world takes a different shape and tone.
     
    Quotes:
    [1:57] “You are not going to be able to fire and hire your way to having all the skills you need for the future of work.” - Yael [2:31] “We can view automation as an opportunity to give employees greater purpose by emphasizing their individual talents and sense of belonging.” - Bob [2:40] “I think if you can, embrace automation as progress and allow each of us to use our gifts more and challenge us more to grow.” - Bob [3:29] “The great opportunity of technology to help you do more with less and then invest the Delta in actually doing more with more.” - Yael [4:55] “Companies need to be talking about their greenhouse gas emissions, what they're emitting and how they are working to combat climate change. They need to be talking about what they're actually doing from a diversity and inclusion lens, and not just saying that they care about diversity, and inclusion, but actually showing proof of what they're doing internally and externally on this. So there's been more seriousness around these topics, and not just hearing companies say words, but showing the proof and showing the data on what they're actually doing.” - Stacy [14:00] “Any tech we bring into the mix has to be set up to align with our corporate social and environmental responsibilities.” - Francis [19:33]  “Pairing with a ve

    • 26 min
    The real impact of resilient operations with Richard Seline

    The real impact of resilient operations with Richard Seline

    2020 made us realize that challenges bigger than we ever expected could happen at any moment. So how do we ensure we’re prepared for whatever environmental threats may impact how we do business in the future? Listen as Richard Seline, co-founder of the Resilience Innovation Hub, talks about the importance of having proactive operations measures in place to be ready for anything. Plus, learn about the benefits from an insurance perspective, how to rethink instant gratification, and what it will take to build a sustainable, supportive business.
     
    Key Takeaways:
    [1:44] Our environmental conditions dictate how our businesses operate. When one hits our community, we see the fallout in real-time. Richard talks about how it’s not important what we do at the moment, but how we act before and after.
    [3:15] Richard defines resiliency as the idea of pre-disaster and risk mitigation.
    [4:00] There’s no chance of reducing every risk, but what preparation can do is reduce the cost and the operational and emotional impact.
    [4:18] At the Resilience Innovation Hub, Richard and his team focus on de-risking business operations, facilities, and communities using a blend of technology, equipment, data science, and alternative capital.
    [8:15] While businesses can’t afford to operate in areas that are most exposed to environmental threats, many still want to continue to build and expand in those regions.
    [12:27] Preparing a stronger infrastructure for natural disasters is going to be more than minor modifications to the day-to-day systems. Richard has been working with water systems since 2014 and has seen the focus more on laws and rights than the tradition of getting water to a shared community.
    [17:39] While private companies are leading the charge in water systems innovation, the public sector is lagging behind.
    [21:04] The breakdown of the supply chain over the course of the pandemic is proof that we need to make our operations as resilient as possible.
    [24:00] If we can make the necessary pivot, we can build more sustainable and resilient businesses that support the communities they serve. Richard shares how you can reduce the cost of the operational impact of future events, but only if you invest ahead of the curve.
     
    Quotes:
    “Our definition of resilience is this idea that if you invest ahead of the curve of an event, it makes you, your family, assets, and your employer much more resilient and stable in handling the shocks.” - 3:15 Richard “There are a lot more water sources than what’s sitting in the ground. There are a lot more innovations. - 14:33 Richard “We have to get out of the pattern of telling ourselves that things are fine as they are, and just going on with business as usual. We can’t sustain it.” 21:04 Richard “I think the challenge for all of us is the ability to adapt and pivot. It’s the ability to recognize that certain traditions and certain expectations in the past are going to evolve.” - 28:33 Richard  
    Continue on your journey:
    pega.com/podcast  
    Mentioned:
    Richard Seline Resilience Innovation Hub

    • 25 min
    Outsmarting the future of cybersecurity with Jody R. Westby and Katryna Dow

    Outsmarting the future of cybersecurity with Jody R. Westby and Katryna Dow

    The way to ensure the most secure cyber future is to stay ahead of tomorrow’s threats, no matter what the current laws and regulations dictate. Tech moves faster than the law – and hackers work faster than both. That’s why Jody R. Westby, CEO of Global Cyber Risk LLC, and Katryna Dow, founder and CEO of personal data platform Meeco, urge businesses to be smart and proactive when crafting their cybersecurity protections. Listen as they talk about how businesses can protect themselves and their customers, the critical areas of businesses to safeguard ahead of time, using security as a competitive advantage, and much more.
     
    Key Takeaways:
    [2:20] Katryna wanted an equitable data ecosystem where everyday people would have a bit more control over how their data would be used, and who would have access to it. She started Meeco, or the me-ecosystem-as a way to build an infrastructure of personal data ecosystems.
    [5:50] Jody realized we needed strong cybersecurity protections put in place so that critical infrastructure data couldn’t be used against us.
    [6:24] Technology has been moving faster than the laws, and Silicon Valley and tech companies have embraced the mantra to beg for forgiveness rather than ask for permission.
    [7:04] The absence of clear and uniform legislation around cybersecurity and data protection has some pressing implications. First, businesses need to come up with their own ways to protect themselves and their customers.
    [10:07] What is a self-sovereign identity or SSI? Katryna talks about the move to SSI’s profound impact on the security and efficiency of power tech’s operations.
    [12:22] Jody says we will start seeing exclusions for paying ransomware for what they think are nation-state-sponsored attacks, and that will leave companies a lot more vulnerable. However, we have to pay attention to the three most important areas that also are the lowest scoring areas in any risk assessment: asset management, incident response, and business continuity.
    [14:02] The GDPR or General Data Protection Regulation is the EU data privacy and security law.
    [20:15]  Some companies are listening to what customers really want, and it's making a big impact. For example, when Apple let iPhone users say yes or no to being tracked, Facebook had the largest drop in shareholder stock value in one day.
    [23:52] Operations leaders should not wait for the worst-case scenario to happen before they start protecting their companies and customers from potential harm.
     
    Quotes:
    "We are in a whole new ballgame right now, and companies are really at risk. We’re not prepared.” - Jody [0:40] “In a data-driven world, there’s a lot of data that’s been collected about me that could actually be enhanced by data from me.” - [5:03] Katryna “The bottom line is when they realize that they've got their stock price and the viability of the company on the line, they'll get more attention to this topic. And that's what we need because companies do not have robust full cybersecurity programs.” - Jody  [12:22] “Do you want to be helping customers have better digital experiences? Or do you want to wait until you're forced to do that?” - [20:50] Katryna “Let's not wait for the worst-case scenario to happen before we start protecting ourselves, our companies and our customers from potential harm. Whether it comes through satellites, a third-party supplier, or your own organization, these threats exist, and with more points of entry to our systems than ever before, they're clearly multiplying. [24:35] - Francis “With disruption being the new normal in OPS, the time to up your cybersecurity game is now because the choice going forward is clear. You can either stay put and pay the price…or you can evolve.” [25:16] - Francis  
    Continue on your journey:
    pega.com/podcast  
    Mentioned:
    Jody Westby Meeco

    • 25 min
    Reversing the top-down operations model with Kieran Gilmurray and Shelly Kramer

    Reversing the top-down operations model with Kieran Gilmurray and Shelly Kramer

    To keep up with the speed of disruption, businesses need to build their culture around adaptability. And there have emerged several ways to do that. From enriching employees with environments that emphasize learning to giving leaders a better perspective of what their customer-focused employees are handling daily, we’ve learned that understanding dynamics and empowering individuals are the keys to finding success in the future of operations. Join digital transformation expert Kieran Gilmurray and senior analyst Shelly Kramer as they share their perspective on what a disrupted operations model has already started to look like.
     
    Key Takeaways:
    [1:40] How exactly do leaders need to rethink their strategies? Kieran suggests that the days of digitally transforming an organization isn’t a technology problem as much as a change in the way management communicates, and bringing in a vision that involves everybody on the team to play their part in the organization.
    [2:49] How do operations leaders need to get accustomed and adapt to this broader world of information and innovation?
    [5:44] While leaders need to get closer to their teams, they also need to offer their workers more freedom to grow, innovate, and serve the customer.
    [6:20] As a leader, you need to empower individuals.
    [7:21] What is a citizen developer? And what exactly is a citizen dentist, and where do we need our hyper-specialized employees? Would we want one working on our teeth?
    [9:36] Great leaders will recognize that everybody has a role in shaping the organization.
    [13:48] Shelly explains how right now, it is very much an employee’s game, and while we are seeing that hybrid work is working, it’s critical for leaders to listen if they want to retain the right talent.
    [17:25] The employee-centric mindset, like the customer-centric mindset, can’t disappear in a sea of high-level ideas and associated jargon.
    [19:12] The challenge for organizations is going to be bringing the tools of technology together with a way to solve a customer problem.
     
    Quotes:
    “I feel adaptability is going to be a key component.” — Kieran [3:06] “My job, as I see it, as a leader and a manager now is to actually hire the right people and give them all the skills that they need to coach and mentor and to clear the obstacles in their path.” — Kieran [6:08] “Our low-code and no-code users will not only become more independent, empowered, and creative problem solvers, but also become citizen educators.” — Francis [11:11] “What we are seeing broadly in the marketplace is that hybrid works. In many instances, hybrid works as well as, if not better than 100% in the office. The reality of it is, if you want to attract and retain talent, you have to listen to what the workforce is telling you what they want and need.” — Shelly [16:06]  
    Continue on your journey:
    pega.com/podcast
     
    Mentioned:
    Kieran Gilmurray Shelly Kramer

    • 20 min
    The steady evolution of government IT ft. Alexis Wichowski 

    The steady evolution of government IT ft. Alexis Wichowski 

    Technologically speaking, the public sector has room to grow. Considering the ever-present threat of leaks and strict hierarchies within government, restrictions on internal comms make it difficult for IT to keep up with the speed of innovation. But according to Alexis Wichowski, deputy CTO for innovation in NYC, innovations are happening – slowly, but surely – in the public sector, affecting both internal comms and external outreach with constituents around community support. Listen as she talks about the current struggles facing public sector IT, its real importance alongside other government work, what becomes possible with more innovative leadership, and more.

     
    Key Takeaways:
    [1:52] Although Twitter plays a critical role in our public discourse now, there was a time when the government remained outside of the public square. Today, Alexis acts as a sort of translator between technological advancement, the public sector and private sector.
    [3:00] Even the most advanced public sector tech teams are behind where the private sector is, almost about a decade behind according to Alexis.
    [3:15] With tools that promote democratized collaboration, there can be some drawbacks. Alexis gives the example of a Google Doc gone wrong and WikiLeaks.
    [6:13] WikiLeaks created a sense of justification for being paranoid about putting things in digital form and set back the information sharing efforts of the government for a long time.
    [8:33] Information exchange can turn into a human moment where you are making a connection and establishing a relationship.
    [9:29] Alexis talks about the collaboration with the community of Brownsville and how they used technology to make the pedestrian plaza brighter and safer. This led to the residents taking pride in their community and feeling more connected.
    [12:40] It is crucial to think about innovation teams and technologists as essential to every single government office and function. Also, it is imperative that our elected officials are in touch with technology and leaders truly show up and talk with their community about the changes that would impact them the most.
    [16:27] How do we draw a line between the domain of government and the domain of IT? Alexis talks about the emerging space of a tech ambassador, and how tech diplomats will be a growing trend. She talks about Microsoft as an example.
    [18:23]  Tech companies are not just providing digital goods and services, they are in our world and wielding power. What will happen if we do not address our responsibility within these “net states”? Alexis talks about how she thinks new product teams will include a product manager, UX and UI designer, developers, and the diplomat/liaison to provide real human interaction.
    [23:20] We need tech-savvy ambassadors between net states and the state as we know it if we want a say in our digital lives.
    [24:08] It starts with responsible people, and everyone demanding ethical innovation.
     
    Quotes:
    [6:13] Inside the government, WikiLeaks was like 9-11. It was this Earth-shattering moment where all of a sudden, the most careful and sensitive information that we had was broadcast worldwide. - Alexis [7:30] There’s a basic rule of thumb in government that’s sort of unspoken but universally acknowledged. If you don’t want to see it in a headline, don’t email it. - Alexis [8:58] Innovation without communication without collaborations is not likely. - Jo [23:20] People don’t join the government because it pays great. They don’t join because it’s glorifying and has a great corner office with a view. They join because the mission matters. - Alexis [23:20] We need tech-savvy ambassadors between net states and the state as we know it if we want a say in our digital lives. - Jo  
    Continue on your journey:
    pega.com/podcast
     
    Mentioned:
    Alexis Wichowski NYC Mayor’s Office of the Chief Technology Center The Information Trade

    • 24 min
    Expanding the reach of tech for good ft. Dr. Phil Budden and Lacey Kesler

    Expanding the reach of tech for good ft. Dr. Phil Budden and Lacey Kesler

    Innovation is about making the future more advanced, but what advancements are we making to help today’s tech be more accessible? Since everyone doesn’t have the same digital reach, more needs to be done to make tech, training, and development opportunities as equitable as possible. Luckily, there are experts ahead of the game. Listen as MIT lecturer Dr. Phil Budden and Webflow community education manager Lacey Kesler talk about the importance of low-code/no-code alternatives, visual development, changing our approach to education, creating more inclusive apps, and more.
     
    Key Takeaways:
    [2:43] Why does bias happen in IT systems? When there isn’t enough diversity in the data sets that the model is being trained on, it takes on this bias in the life of the algorithm. Elizabeth shares an example in facial recognition where the data ends up being sold on the market, a customer uses that data, and makes a decision about whether or not someone is deemed a threat based on biased information. Then, if law enforcement agencies decide to use that data, they can over-police in already over policed communities and cause a systemic problem, all because of that data.
    [5:35] All areas of our life are impacted by algorithms, from traffic patterns to predictions about who should get a loan, their interest rate, health insurance, and what type of health coverage someone is granted.
    [6:13] Joe shares two scenarios about how humans will interact with machines over the next coming decades. First, humans are replaced by machines. Second, and the most likely scenario, humans will collaborate with machines to create a better solution and higher productivity.
    [8:00] Human supervision can be extremely relevant in using information technology and AI. Joe shares some examples from MIT’s Kevin Slavin such as flash crashes, caused by program trading.
    [10:54] Responsibility in AI is a shared responsibility between both the technical and non technical teams. Building ethical technology doesn’t eliminate the possibility of unethical results, and we need more resources dedicated to areas like AI Ethics and governance within our companies, especially large ones acting as nation states.
    [16:27] Elizabeth discusses some best practices that will add ethics into more computer science courses and students get a critical perspective early on.
    [18:09] Companies that don’t consider themselves to be in the tech business will need to play catch up fast and take on that responsibility themselves before the government has to step in. Hopefully, more companies will begin to take a more serious look at the ethical components of the tech they rely on. Elizabeth discusses the long-wave theory, which talks about how long it takes for all of the different revolutions.
    [23:27] Will we be in a Terminator SkyNet scenario? Quite possibly, says Joe, but we have to figure out where humans are going to be in the loop and understand what our algorithms are doing and how they're training other algorithms.
     
    Quotes:
    [2:25] “Data is what they’re calling the new oil, and there’s a race to how much data a company can consume.” - Elizabeth [5:39] “All the technologies that make sense of more data in less time and more intricate ways are fueling some of the most exciting and polarizing advancements.” - Jo [7:57] “The best performance sometimes is through a joint human and machine.” - Joe [14:10] “If you look at human behavior, you have a wide spectrum of possibilities, ranging from Mother Teresa to say a dictator that kills millions of people. The way the technology gets employed, and that is not the technology's fault.” - Joe [18:48] “For those companies who are not able to quickly adapt to this digital moment that we are having, I don’t think they will be around for long. That’s where we are, where we are going to stay, and where the jobs are going to be.” - Elizabeth [25:18] “We have to put ethics at the forefront of all of our b

    • 26 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
11 Ratings

11 Ratings

mattabollixxx ,

Awesome stories that goes beyond tech

Great guests, great host, great production! Love it!

Imakeaudio ,

Inspiring, Fun Tech and Business show

Really nicely done!

Ezra Z ,

Build for Change 💪🧠

So awesome!!!!

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