11 min

Breaking Free from Diet Culture and the Illusion of Quick Fixes ( A New Year, A New You‪)‬ Health Bite

    • Nutrition

Have you ever had the phrase "to lose weight" in your list of new year's resolutions? What happened? Were you able to do it, or did you – for some reasons – terribly fail? 

Losing weight is still one of the most popular new year’s resolutions up to this date. Many people tend to do it by means of “diet”, though that culture is now slowly being canceled.

That is good, won't lie. Diet culture brings us more bad than good, afterall. But as people reject diet culture nowadays, the thought and act of losing weight – which again, should not be shamed – is continuously being brought along with it.

As we've always talked about, wanting to be better for ourselves and loved ones isn't supposed to be placed under negative spaces. So I invite you to tune in as Dr. Adrienne once again reminds you that while you are good just as you are, and you can be healthy just as you are, still, there is no shame in wanting to lose weight, to be better, for a better life.

In this episode, Dr. Adrienne discusses how our relationship with food reflects our relationship with ourselves as she points out the reason why the word “resolution” is politically incorrect and explains why we should reject diet culture without shaming ourselves for wanting to lose weight.


What you will learn from this episode:
Understand why the concept of "resolution" may not be helpful or inclusive, and consider alternative ways to set goalsExplore the importance of self-acceptance and self-care, and how they can coexist with the desire to improve health and well-beingLearn about the role of compassion and accountability in addressing excess weight, and how they can support positive change


“If you think the word “resolution” is politically incorrect, try saying 'weight loss'."
– Dr. Adrienne Youdim 


Today’s Health Bite: Wanting to lose weight is not the same as shaming yourself or suggesting that you are not enough. In fact, it's the opposite. Let's reject diet culture together, but let's also reject that notion that trying or wanting to do something for yourself, for your mind, and for your body by losing weight is shameful
 
Recommended Resource
Hungry for More: Stories and Science to Inspire Weight Loss From the Inside Out by Dr. Adrienne Youdim If you love it and you think it is of benefit, please share this podcast with one person that you love. You can also go to http://www.dradrienneyoudim.com and sign up for my newsletter. If you prefer to get information in written form, you can get these tips via newsletter every week.

Have you ever had the phrase "to lose weight" in your list of new year's resolutions? What happened? Were you able to do it, or did you – for some reasons – terribly fail? 

Losing weight is still one of the most popular new year’s resolutions up to this date. Many people tend to do it by means of “diet”, though that culture is now slowly being canceled.

That is good, won't lie. Diet culture brings us more bad than good, afterall. But as people reject diet culture nowadays, the thought and act of losing weight – which again, should not be shamed – is continuously being brought along with it.

As we've always talked about, wanting to be better for ourselves and loved ones isn't supposed to be placed under negative spaces. So I invite you to tune in as Dr. Adrienne once again reminds you that while you are good just as you are, and you can be healthy just as you are, still, there is no shame in wanting to lose weight, to be better, for a better life.

In this episode, Dr. Adrienne discusses how our relationship with food reflects our relationship with ourselves as she points out the reason why the word “resolution” is politically incorrect and explains why we should reject diet culture without shaming ourselves for wanting to lose weight.


What you will learn from this episode:
Understand why the concept of "resolution" may not be helpful or inclusive, and consider alternative ways to set goalsExplore the importance of self-acceptance and self-care, and how they can coexist with the desire to improve health and well-beingLearn about the role of compassion and accountability in addressing excess weight, and how they can support positive change


“If you think the word “resolution” is politically incorrect, try saying 'weight loss'."
– Dr. Adrienne Youdim 


Today’s Health Bite: Wanting to lose weight is not the same as shaming yourself or suggesting that you are not enough. In fact, it's the opposite. Let's reject diet culture together, but let's also reject that notion that trying or wanting to do something for yourself, for your mind, and for your body by losing weight is shameful
 
Recommended Resource
Hungry for More: Stories and Science to Inspire Weight Loss From the Inside Out by Dr. Adrienne Youdim If you love it and you think it is of benefit, please share this podcast with one person that you love. You can also go to http://www.dradrienneyoudim.com and sign up for my newsletter. If you prefer to get information in written form, you can get these tips via newsletter every week.

11 min