100 episodes

Brew Theology exists to brew theology and create healthy, meaningful and eclectic dialogue in pub communities. Coming to a city, town, burb, church, earbud etc. near you!

Brew Theology Podcast Ryan Miller

    • Religion & Spirituality
    • 5.0, 28 Ratings

Brew Theology exists to brew theology and create healthy, meaningful and eclectic dialogue in pub communities. Coming to a city, town, burb, church, earbud etc. near you!

    Episode 158 - Dr. Pam Eisenbaum - Antisemitism, Racism, and Xenophobia - Part 2

    Episode 158 - Dr. Pam Eisenbaum - Antisemitism, Racism, and Xenophobia - Part 2

    Listen in on our Zoom conversation with Pam Eisenbaum. Part 2 contains our question and answer session with the Denver Brew Theology crew.________Although these contemporary issues challenging our world today seem far removed from the world of the Bible, there are many today who read the Bible—or at least revere it as a source of authority—with the belief that it offers them guidance on how they live their lives. Most Bible readers do not read Greek and Hebrew and thus depend upon scholars and preachers who do the work of translation and interpretation. Unfortunately, much of the Bible in translation perpetuates stereotypes that contribute to the plagues of Anti-Semitism, Racism, and Xenophobia, and in many cases, contemporary translations make them worse. Moreover, long-held destructive traditions of interpretation accompany the minds of unwitting readers or reciters of favorite scriptural passages.
     
    In this podcast we will consider a few illustrative examples of misread, mistranslated, misused, and misunderstood snippets from the Bible—little phrases and sentences that have had enormously bad effects, even though, in most cases, such effects were not inevitable. But, before we look at texts, I first want us to look at a few recent incidents. I hope not only to show ways in which the Bible—at least certain texts—inform and inflame hatred, but I also want to show the ways in which Anti-Semitism and racism—particularly anti-Black racism are linked. They are not merely two examples of negative stereotyping or bias against marginalized groups; the two are often linked in ways that need explaining.
     
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    Pamela Eisenbaum is professor of Biblical studies and Christian origins at Iliff, and is associate faculty of the Center for Judaic Studies at the University of Denver. One of four Jewish New Testament scholars teaching in Christian theological schools, she is the author of The Jewish Heroes of Christian History: Hebrews 11 in Literary Context, Invitations to Romans, and most recently, Paul Was Not a Christian: The Original Message of a Misunderstood Apostle. She has published many essays on the Bible, ancient Judaism and the origins of Christianity, and is an active member of the Society of Biblical Literature.
     
    A passion for working with ancient manuscripts has increasingly informed her research. Professor Eisenbaum has experience working with the Dead Sea Scrolls and spent time at the Chester Beatty Library in Dublin studying the oldest surviving manuscript of Paul’s Letters (dated c. 200 C.E.). She appeared in the ABC documentary, “Jesus and Paul: The Word and the Witness.”
     
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    Announcements: We will be taking an official one month break and will come back with a complete season ready to go. 

    • 52 min
    Episode 157 - Dr. Pam Eisenbaum - Antisemitism, Racism and Xenophobia - Part 1

    Episode 157 - Dr. Pam Eisenbaum - Antisemitism, Racism and Xenophobia - Part 1

    “Anti-Semitism, Racism, and Xenophobia – Biblical Interpreters Aren’t Helping”Listen in on our Zoom conversation with Pam Eisenbaum. Part 1 will be her presentation, Part 2 will have our question and answer session. ________Although these contemporary issues challenging our world today seem far removed from the world of the Bible, there are many today who read the Bible—or at least revere it as a source of authority—with the belief that it offers them guidance on how they live their lives. Most Bible readers do not read Greek and Hebrew and thus depend upon scholars and preachers who do the work of translation and interpretation. Unfortunately, much of the Bible in translation perpetuates stereotypes that contribute to the plagues of Anti-Semitism, Racism, and Xenophobia, and in many cases, contemporary translations make them worse. Moreover, long-held destructive traditions of interpretation accompany the minds of unwitting readers or reciters of favorite scriptural passages.In this podcast we will consider a few illustrative examples of misread, mistranslated, misused, and misunderstood snippets from the Bible—little phrases and sentences that have had enormously bad effects, even though, in most cases, such effects were not inevitable. But, before we look at texts, I first want us to look at a few recent incidents. I hope not only to show ways in which the Bible—at least certain texts—inform and inflame hatred, but I also want to show the ways in which Anti-Semitism and racism—particularly anti-Black racism are linked. They are not merely two examples of negative stereotyping or bias against marginalized groups; the two are often linked in ways that need explaining.///Pamela Eisenbaum is professor of Biblical studies and Christian origins at Iliff, and is associate faculty of the Center for Judaic Studies at the University of Denver. One of four Jewish New Testament scholars teaching in Christian theological schools, she is the author of The Jewish Heroes of Christian History: Hebrews 11 in Literary Context, Invitations to Romans, and most recently, Paul Was Not a Christian: The Original Message of a Misunderstood Apostle. She has published many essays on the Bible, ancient Judaism and the origins of Christianity, and is an active member of the Society of Biblical Literature.A passion for working with ancient manuscripts has increasingly informed her research. Professor Eisenbaum has experience working with the Dead Sea Scrolls and spent time at the Chester Beatty Library in Dublin studying the oldest surviving manuscript of Paul’s Letters (dated c. 200 C.E.). She appeared in the ABC documentary, “Jesus and Paul: The Word and the Witness.”
     
    //
     
    Announcements: We will be taking an official one month break and will come back with a complete season ready to go. 

    • 51 min
    Episode 156: Visions of Self in Jodo Shinshu Buddhism with Rev. Diana Thompson (Part 2)

    Episode 156: Visions of Self in Jodo Shinshu Buddhism with Rev. Diana Thompson (Part 2)

    Part 2... The convo continues with Diana, starting with "feelings!" Yup. She’s a bad ass Buddhist Reverend from the Tri-State Denver Buddhist Temple; you definitely don’t wanna miss episode 156 (Part 2 of 2 on "Visions of Self in Jodo Shinshu Buddhism"), friends! 
    Self: 1: the essential person distinct from all other persons in identity 2: a particular side of a person’s character (Merriam-Webster)
    Self: 1. A person’s essential being that distinguishes them from others, especially considered as the object of introspection or reflexive action. (Oxford online dictionary)
    These are definitions of the ‘self’ as it is understood in the English language. Both imply a unique, individual ‘something’ that makes us who we are. By using the word ‘essential’ these definitions also seem to imply that there is some permanence to this self, an absolute core at the center of our being that goes unchanged. This unique individual is one who stands out and apart from others, the ‘self-made’, ‘self-taught’ person who ‘rides alone’. (I’m a loner, Dottie. A rebel.’) This narrative of the independent, self-made person has shaped the ways in which we view the ‘self’ both in positive and negative ways. On the positive side, it encourages us to veer away from a ‘sheep’ mentality and to think for ourselves. On the negative side, it produces a culture in which people are shamed for seeking outside help and causes them to shy away from even simple acknowledgment and gratitude to those who do or are willing to help.
    For Buddhists, this human desire for a permanent, independent self, is the cause of much of our suffering. We experience anxiety when we feel that we that we don’t know who we are and so we will set out on journeys of self-discovery in order to find that essential something that is ‘myself’ apart from others and we experience extra anxiety if we cannot find it. This is not to say that Buddhists would discourage the journey. The questioning or examination of the self is not the problem. The problem is our greed (desire for permanence), anger (frustration when we can’t find it) and stupidity (our stubborn refusal to accept impermanence and interdependence). We are all suffering from G.A.S.
    Time to get GAS(y), friends. 
    If you are a fan of any of our Brew Theology shows, give this episode a share on the interwebs, rate Brew Theology on iTunes and give BT a brewtastic review! Head over to the Brew Theology website, www.brewtheology.org to learn more, and/or become a local partner, sponsor and financial contributor. Questions & inquiries about Brew Theology, the alliance/network, Denver community or podcast, contact Ryan Miller: ryan@brewtheology.org &/ or janel@brewtheology.org.
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    Follow us on Facebook & Instagram (@brewtheology) & Twitter (@brew_theology)
    Brew Theology swag HERE. T-shirts, tanks, hoodies, V-neck's, women's, etc. all in multiple colors.
    Note for all of you beer nerds during this time of Covid-19 Quarantine craziness: While our BT communities are still meeting online across the country (via ZOOM and Google Chats), we miss hanging at our local breweries BIG TIME. That said, you can still sip on the nectar of the local gods as you listen to BT podcasts. Beer-To-Go!!!! We (Denver) would like to give some love to our friends over at Grandma's House on S. Broadway.. some of the best beer in CO for sure! 

    • 35 min
    Episode 155 - Visions of Self in Jodo Shinshu Buddhism with Rev. Diana Thompson (Part 1)

    Episode 155 - Visions of Self in Jodo Shinshu Buddhism with Rev. Diana Thompson (Part 1)

    Our good friend, Diana, is back! She’s a bad ass Buddhist Reverend from the Tri-State Denver Buddhist Temple; you definitely don’t wanna miss episode 155 (Part 1 of 2 on "Visions of Self in Jodo Shinshu Buddhism"), friends! 
    Self: 1: the essential person distinct from all other persons in identity 2: a particular side of a person’s character (Merriam-Webster)
    Self: 1. A person’s essential being that distinguishes them from others, especially considered as the object of introspection or reflexive action. (Oxford online dictionary)
    These are definitions of the ‘self’ as it is understood in the English language. Both imply a unique, individual ‘something’ that makes us who we are. By using the word ‘essential’ these definitions also seem to imply that there is some permanence to this self, an absolute core at the center of our being that goes unchanged. This unique individual is one who stands out and apart from others, the ‘self-made’, ‘self-taught’ person who ‘rides alone’. (I’m a loner, Dottie. A rebel.’) This narrative of the independent, self-made person has shaped the ways in which we view the ‘self’ both in positive and negative ways. On the positive side, it encourages us to veer away from a ‘sheep’ mentality and to think for ourselves. On the negative side, it produces a culture in which people are shamed for seeking outside help and causes them to shy away from even simple acknowledgment and gratitude to those who do or are willing to help.
    For Buddhists, this human desire for a permanent, independent self, is the cause of much of our suffering. We experience anxiety when we feel that we that we don’t know who we are and so we will set out on journeys of self-discovery in order to find that essential something that is ‘myself’ apart from others and we experience extra anxiety if we cannot find it. This is not to say that Buddhists would discourage the journey. The questioning or examination of the self is not the problem. The problem is our greed (desire for permanence), anger (frustration when we can’t find it) and stupidity (our stubborn refusal to accept impermanence and interdependence). We are all suffering from G.A.S.
    Time to get GAS(y), friends. 
    If you are a fan of any of our Brew Theology shows, give this episode a share on the interwebs, rate Brew Theology on iTunes and give BT a brewtastic review! Head over to the Brew Theology website, www.brewtheology.org to learn more, and/or become a local partner, sponsor and financial contributor. Questions & inquiries about Brew Theology, the alliance/network, Denver community or podcast, contact Ryan Miller: ryan@brewtheology.org &/ or janel@brewtheology.org.
    ///
    Follow us on Facebook & Instagram (@brewtheology) & Twitter (@brew_theology)
    Brew Theology swag HERE. T-shirts, tanks, hoodies, V-neck's, women's, etc. all in multiple colors.
    Note for all of you beer nerds during this time of Covid-19 Quarantine craziness: While our BT communities are still meeting online across the country (via ZOOM and Google Chats), we miss hanging at our local breweries BIG TIME. That said, you can still sip on the nectar of the local gods as you listen to BT podcasts. Beer-To-Go!!!! We (Denver) would like to give some love to our friends over at the River North taproom north on Washington (they have two BTW)... some of the best beer in CO for sure! 

    • 42 min
    Episode 154: COVID-19 Edition with Janel Apps Ramsey

    Episode 154: COVID-19 Edition with Janel Apps Ramsey

    In Episode 154 of the Brew Theology Podcast, Co-Director of Brew Theology, Janel Apps Ramsey, delivers a  highly relevant recording on all things Covid-19. Janel gleans from a variety of sources and provides extremely helpful information for coping with the new NEW of today's crazy world.. there are so many helpful tips in this show integrating body, mind, soul and spirit practices. Cheers (virtually), and don't forget to wear a mask out in public, friends. 
    If you are a fan of any of our Brew Theology shows, give this episode a share on the interwebs, rate Brew Theology on iTunes and give BT a brewtastic review! Head over to the Brew Theology website, www.brewtheology.org to learn more, and/or become a local partner, sponsor and financial contributor. Questions & inquiries about Brew Theology, the alliance/network, Denver community or podcast, contact Ryan Miller: ryan@brewtheology.org &/ or janel@brewtheology.org.
    ///
    Follow us on Facebook & Instagram (@brewtheology) & Twitter (@brew_theology)
    Brew Theology swag HERE. T-shirts, tanks, hoodies, V-neck's, women's, etc. all in multiple colors.

    • 30 min
    Episode 153: LIVE Podcast event with McAfee School of Theology - Part 2 - Dr. Thomas Slater

    Episode 153: LIVE Podcast event with McAfee School of Theology - Part 2 - Dr. Thomas Slater

    Who's ready for PART 2? Get ready for some hopilicious good times LIVE from Atlanta! On episode 153 of the Brew Theology Podcast, Ryan and Janel sit down with Dr. Thomas Slater from the McAfee School of Theology (Part 2) and brew up the topic of Revelation... and his book, "Revelation as Civil Disobedience." This talk leaves behind #LeftBehind and moves forward in context and courage.
    If you missed part 1, check out Dr. Robert Nash from McAffee... (Topic: The mission of the church in a 21st C. pluralistic world, and more!)
    We had the honor to unite with McAfee School of Theology at Mercer University  for their THIRD annual live podcast recording! This year's event featured McAfee's Dr Nash and Dr. Thomas Slater at the historic Selah Room at the Church at Ponce & Highlands. 
    If you are a fan of any of our Brew Theology shows, give this episode a share on the interwebs, rate Brew Theology on iTunes and give BT a brewtastic review! Head over to the Brew Theology website, www.brewtheology.org to learn more, and/or become a local partner, sponsor and financial contributor. Questions & inquiries about Brew Theology, the alliance/network, Denver community or podcast, contact Ryan Miller: ryan@brewtheology.org &/ or janel@brewtheology.org.
    ///
    Follow us on Facebook & Instagram (@brewtheology) & Twitter (@brew_theology)
    Brew Theology swag HERE. T-shirts, tanks, hoodies, V-neck's, women's, etc. all in multiple colors.
    * Thomas B. Slater is Professor of New Testament Language & Literature. He received his bachelor's degree from Arkansas Tech University and the Master of Theology (MTH=M.Div.) and the Doctor of Ministry degrees, respectively, from Perkins School of Theology, Southern Methodist University. King's College London, The University of London awarded him the degree Doctor of Philosophy in Biblical Studies (New Testament emphasis), where he studied with Prof. Graham Stanton. His Ph.D. thesis, "Christ and Community," examined the sociological impact of the major images of Christ in the Apocalypse to John.Before coming to McAfee, Slater worked at Jackson Theological Seminary in N. Little Rock, AR, Birkbeck College in London and the University of Georgia. At Jackson, he served as academic dean for two years and then dean for a year. Under his leadership Jackson received certification from the Arkansas Department of Higher Education to award its Master of Ecclesiastical Studies (a two-year degree), its Bachelor of Theological Studies and its Certificate in Theology. This was Jackson's historic first certification.At the University of Georgia, he held dual appointments in Religion and African American Studies, teaching courses in New Testament studies and African American biblical interpretation. He also served as undergraduate advisor, graduate coordinator and chair of the departmental Academic Affairs committee. Between his time at Jackson and Georgia, he was an adjunct for Birkbeck College where he taught an introductory survey New Testament course. At McAfee he teaches introductory and advanced classes in New Testament. With Dr. Denise Massey, he also advises the Multicultural Student Association.Dr. Slater has published and continues to publish in scholarly journals and venues around the world. His major areas of interest are Jewish and Christian apocalypticism written between 220 BCE and 200 CE and also deutero-Pauline writings (Colossians and Ephesians). His first book was a revision of his Ph.D. thesis and he is currently working on a commentary on Ephesians for Smyth and Helwys. Currently, he is working on three other projects: (1) an examination of Ephesians from an African American perspective; (2) the social setting of John's Apocalypse and (3) an examination of the Synoptic Son of Man sayings. An ordained elder in full connection in the Georgia North Region of the Christian Methodist Episcopal Church, Dr. Slater

    • 50 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
28 Ratings

28 Ratings

Swrmacres ,

This podcast is dope

Love this group and podcast. Definitely worth a listen.

Preston Price ,

Diversity.

I really enjoy the democratic spirit in this podcast group. No one has the last voice. I also like the varied perspectives from around the table.

Jules Willis ,

Ground breaking!

The concept of Brew Theology is simple, yet I believe it to be ground breaking and extremely vital to the Christian community on a number of levels! The Christian church as a whole can often be associated with an extreme lack of tolerance, deep seeded judgement and an overall zealous attitude, especially in the eyes of non believers. Christians often have a strict "box" we feel we all should fit into. i.e.) If you are a Christian you must also be a republic, against gay marriage, etc... Brew Theology breaks all of the stereotypes when it comes to faith, politics, and important current event topics! It allows people of all faiths and political affiliations to come together in a peaceful manner to discuss ALL topics, without the slightest hint of judgement or contention. I think if more people in the Christian community (actually ALL communities) took on this open-minded mindset, we would actually see true, positive and lasting change!

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