17 episodes

"Education News Parents Can Use" is a monthly TV show of the U.S. Department of Education. The program focuses on schools, learning and the implementation of federal education regulations and law, including the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. Its purpose is to offer parents information about getting involved in children's learning. Cable in the Classroom (www.ciconline.org) is pleased to provide these broadcasts in podcast (audio-only format), suitable for listening to on your computer or portable MP3 player.

Cable in the Classroom Presents Education News Parents Can Use Cable in the Classroom (www.ciconline.org)

    • Kids & Family

"Education News Parents Can Use" is a monthly TV show of the U.S. Department of Education. The program focuses on schools, learning and the implementation of federal education regulations and law, including the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. Its purpose is to offer parents information about getting involved in children's learning. Cable in the Classroom (www.ciconline.org) is pleased to provide these broadcasts in podcast (audio-only format), suitable for listening to on your computer or portable MP3 player.

    Summer Programs: Keeping Students Reading and Learning

    Summer Programs: Keeping Students Reading and Learning

    Cable in the Classroom is pleased to present via podcast [MP3, 54MB], the June 19, 2007 edition of the U.S. Department of Education's Education News Parents Can Use. This edition showcases several award-winning and effective summer learning programs; explores innovative strategies to academically engage and nurture low-income and disadvantaged youth during the summer; profiles corporate, community and library-based initiatives designed to encourage students to read and learn during the break; and spotlights the efforts of organizations dedicated to providing disadvantaged students with access to books and reading materials in the summer and throughout the year. Educators, policymakers, parents and community leaders will discuss key issues such as: Why is it important to sustain academic skills over the break and avoid the “summer slide?” What does an effective and high-quality summer learning program look like? What kinds of summer programs are available and who offers them? What types of summer reading programs are available to students and how can parents find out more about them? What can parents do during the summer encourage their children to continue learning? How can parents, schools, libraries and community organizations access free children’s books and reading materials? For more information about this program, please see the U.S. Department of Education's show notes. Technorati tags: summer school, summer programs, reading, informal learning, NCLB, parents, US Department of Education, cable, CIC, Cable in the Classroom, cableintheclassroom, tv, school, education, NCTA

    Charters and School Choice

    Charters and School Choice

    Cable in the Classroom is pleased to present via podcast [MP3, 54MB], the April 19, 2007 edition of the U.S. Department of Education's Education News Parents Can Use. Today, parents have more choices than ever— they can choose from neighborhood schools, charter schools or other public schools of choice, or transfer their children to another public school in or out of district. Families can also select private schools, either religious or secular, or teach their children at home. Free tutoring programs are also available to families with students in certain low-performing schools. This episode highlights Bush Administration proposals to expand public and private school choice, as well as successful charter and school choice programs, as educators, policymakers and parent-leaders discuss key issues such as: What are the latest tools and options for parents under No Child Left Behind? How has the charter school and school choice movement impacted academic achievement? What does a high-performing choice program or charter school look like? If a child is attending a school “in need of improvement,” where does a parent go to find out information on school choice options and free tutoring providers? What are Opportunity Scholarships and how might they benefit parents whose children attend chronically underperforming schools? What kinds of new choice initiatives can parents look forward to under No Child Left Behind? What resources does the Department provide to inform parents about the full range of options available to them under the law? For more information about this program, please see the U.S. Department of Education's show notes. Those seeking more information about exemplary charter school programs might be interested in learning about those profiled in several past editions of Cable in the Classroom's Threshold, including most recently here. Finally, in concert with the producers of Education News Parents Can Use, we would like to add our heartfelt condolences to those touched by the recent Virginia Tech tragedy. Last fall, Cable in the Classroom partnered with the Council of Chief State School Officers to produce a special edition of Threshold focused on disaster preparedness in the 21st century, including advice and resources for school officials charged with emergency planning for schools. Technorati Tags: charters, charter school, school choice, school shooting, Virginia Tech, disaster preparedness, CIC, Cable in the Classroom, cableintheclassroom

    Transforming Higher Education: Access and Affordability for All Students

    Transforming Higher Education: Access and Affordability for All Students

    Cable in the Classroom is pleased to present via podcast [MP3, 55MB], the March 20, 2007 edition of the U.S. Department of Education's Education News Parents Can Use. In an era when what students know is the most important factor in determining success, postsecondary education has never been more critical. Yet, there are far too many Americans who want to go to college but can’t, either because they’re not prepared or can’t afford it. In this episode, award-winning educators, university leaders, students and other experts discuss the Commission on the Future of Higher Education's final report and the Secretary' Action Plan for Higher Education, and explore how the Department, parents, schools, and higher education institutions together can put the Commission's recommendations into action to better prepare students for college, to help them succeed once enrolled, and to make college affordable. It addresses questions such as: Why is a college education more important than ever before? What federal, state and local strategies are helping us to meet this demand? How accessible is higher education? And how can we make it more affordable? How can we help students, especially minority youth, prepare for and succeed in college? How will the Commission on the Future of Higher Education’s final report and the Secretary’s Action Plan improve the accessibility, affordability and accountability of U.S. colleges and universities? When should parents and students start thinking about saving for college, and what programs and resources are available to help? For more information about this program, please see the U.S. Department of Education's show notes. Technorati Tags: college, university, financial aid, financialaid, pell grant, affordability, college admissions, student loan, college cost, CIC, Cable in the Classroom, cableintheclassroom

    Math and Science Education: Critical Skills for the 21st Century

    Math and Science Education: Critical Skills for the 21st Century

    Cable in the Classroom is pleased to present via podcast [MP3, 55MB], the February 20, 2007 edition of the U.S. Department of Education's Education News Parents Can Use. To ensure that this and future generations of students have the math and science skills to be globally competitive, we must build a stronger foundation in these subjects in the early grades, and encourage more children to consider careers in math and science. This episode focuses on a series of targeted math and science-related investments the President has proposed under the American Competitiveness Initiative. As described in the program, the Initiative aims to strengthen K-12 math and science education in a number of innovative ways. It addresses questions such as: What is the “global economy” and what new demands does it place on our students and our schools? How does No Child Left Behind strengthen math and science? How will the 2007 science assessments help? How will the American Competitiveness Initiative help to improve math and science instruction, student competence and achievement, and ultimately close the achievement gaps? How can parents encourage their children to learn mathematics and science outside the classroom? What should students be learning in mathematics and science at the elementary, middle and high school grades? What must change in the way these subjects are currently being taught? How can we encourage all students, especially girls and minority students, to pursue math and science careers? For more information about this program, please see the U.S. Department of Education's show notes. Listeners may also be interested in the work of the Partnership for 21st Century Skills, of which Cable in the Classroom is a founding board member, as well the Spring 2005 edition of Cable in the Classroom's Threshold (produced in partnership with NASA), which focused on the future of math and science education. In addition, science education is the theme of the March 2007 edition of Cable in the Classroom Magazine. Technorati Tags: Parents, News, NCLB, US Department of Education, public domain, 21st century skills, competitiveness, math, science, spellings, CIC, Cable in the Classroom, cableintheclassroom

    No Child Left Behind Anniversary: Stories of Success

    No Child Left Behind Anniversary: Stories of Success

    Cable in the Classroom is pleased to present via podcast [MP3, 52MB], the January 16, 2007 edition of the U.S. Department of Education's Education News Parents Can Use. This episode features examples of high-performing public schools that are meeting the goals of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB), where all students are succeeding. The program profiles these schools, featuring stories of their classrooms in action and conversations with principals and education experts about how assessment, accountability, parent options and a firm belief that all children can learn is raising the bar as never before. It addresses questions such as: Five years after being signed into law, how do we know that No Child Left Behind is working? What are the core principles of the law and what do they mean? How do they help students learn? How can the reforms of the law be extended to high school and beyond, and why is this important to American competitiveness? What kinds of options does No Child Left Behind offer to parents, especially those of students struggling in school? How can parents better take advantage of these choices or find out more about them? What are some examples of award-winning schools that have all children learning at grade level today, and what can other schools learn from their examples? What new ideas have strengthened No Child Left Behind over the years, such as growth model pilots, teacher incentives, and other initiatives? For more information about this program, please see the U.S. Department of Education's show notes. Technorati tags: Parents, News, NCLB, US Department of Education, public domain, CIC, Cable in the Classroom, cableintheclassroom, CIC My Podcast Alley feed! {pca-ae14fd9aa1f91a499da32048c2059486}

    High Schools: Expanding the Promise of No Child Left Behind

    High Schools: Expanding the Promise of No Child Left Behind

    Cable in the Classroom is pleased to present via podcast [MP3, 53MB], the September 20, 2005 edition of the U.S. Department of Education's Education News Parents Can Use. The high school diploma symbolically marks the moment American youths enter adulthood. Yet, today, many students, particularly minority and disadvantaged youths, leave high school unprepared, often lacking the basic skills they need to get a high-wage job or to pursue postsecondary education and training. To succeed in a global economy shaped by technology and international competition, all high school students, regardless of their post-graduation plans, must acquire a high level of academic knowledge and skills during high school. This edition features special back-to-school tips and addresses issues such as: How do U.S. high schools need to change to meet the demands of the 21st century? How has No Child Left Behind impacted the academic performance of our country’s younger students, and how can its principles be expanded to our nation’s high schools? What high school strategies are showing measurable results in positively affecting the achievement gap? What are the most effective models of high school reform? What should parents be doing to ensure their middle and high school aged children are prepared to succeed in the new school year? For more information about this program, please see the U.S. Department of Education's show notes. Listeners may also be interested in the Spring 2006 edition of Threshold (produced in cooperation with the Partnership for 21st Century Skills), which focuses on high school reform and competitiveness. Technorati tags: Parents, News, NCLB, US Department of Education, public domain, high school reform, CIC, Cable in the Classroom

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