28 episodes

A weekly (term-time) podcast featuring brief interviews with the presenters at the Cambridge American History Seminar. We talk about presenters' current research and paper, their broader academic interests as well as a few more general questions. If you have any feedback, suggestions or questions, contact us via Twitter @camericanist or via email ltd27@cam.ac.uk . Thanks for listening!

Cambridge American History Seminar Podcast Cambridge American History Seminar Podcast

    • Education

A weekly (term-time) podcast featuring brief interviews with the presenters at the Cambridge American History Seminar. We talk about presenters' current research and paper, their broader academic interests as well as a few more general questions. If you have any feedback, suggestions or questions, contact us via Twitter @camericanist or via email ltd27@cam.ac.uk . Thanks for listening!

    Mario Del Pero on 'In the Shadow of the Vatican', 17/2/20

    Mario Del Pero on 'In the Shadow of the Vatican', 17/2/20

    Professor Mario Del Pero, Professor of International History, Institut d’études politiques at Sciences Po, Paris, speaks about his paper 'In the Shadow of the Vatican' with PhD student Christopher Schaefer.

    The pair discuss the missionary efforts of a small group of evangelical Christians, members of the 'Church of Christ', who moved from Lubbock, Texas to Castelli Romani, Italy, in 1948. They explore the history of Pentecostalism and the Waldensian movement in Italy, concerns about the pressures of the Vatican on the Italian state, and the constant spectre of communism that loomed over debates regarding religious practice and the growing American presence in Europe in the years following the Second World War. They also discuss the promises and perils of microhistory for historians of modern Europe.

    As mentioned during the introduction, after this week all seminars until the end of term have been cancelled on account of scheduled industrial action. That means that unless something drastically changes, you won't hear from us again until the end of April. If you have any questions, suggestions or feedback, get in touch via @camericanist on Twitter or ltd27@cam.ac.uk. Spread the word, and thanks for listening!

    • 41 min
    Emma Teitelman on 'Class and State in America’s Greater Reconstruction', 3/2/20

    Emma Teitelman on 'Class and State in America’s Greater Reconstruction', 3/2/20

    Back to our normal format this week. Emma Teitelman, Mellon Research Fellow in American History at the University of Cambridge, talks to Lewis Defrates about her paper ‘Class and State in America’s Greater Reconstruction’

    Dr Teitelman’s paper discusses the efforts of groups of north-eastern capitalists in the years following the Civil War to work with the federal government to engender new forms of social organization based around free labour capitalism in the ‘peripheries’, i.e. the American south and west. The project looks at the developing relationship between the state and private capital in transforming the United States in the decades following the rupture of the Civil War

    Here, Dr Teitelman talks largely about the work of two public-private groups, the Southern Famine Relief Commission and the Board of Indian Commissioners, in the years between 1865-1874. We also discuss the broader project, what these new ‘social relations’ looked like, and perhaps the most anticipated ‘favourite album’ answer yet.

    If you have any questions, suggestions or feedback, get in touch via @camericanist on Twitter or ltd27@cam.ac.uk. Spread the word, and thanks for listening!

    (NB: there’s one moment in this interview where I ‘punch in’ a rerecording of a question I asked, as the original recording was unusable due to the flow of conversation. This might be noticeable to listeners - it certainly is to me - but the wording is almost identical to what was asked at the time, promise!)

    • 30 min
    Heather Ann Thompson Pitt Inaugural Lecture 27/1/2020

    Heather Ann Thompson Pitt Inaugural Lecture 27/1/2020

    This is a special episode of the CAHS podcast, as Pitt Professor of American History and Institutions Heather Ann Thompson delivers her inaugural lecture on 'American Prison Uprisings and Why They Matter Today', with introductory comments from Professor Gary Gerstle.

    Apologies for the quasi-'field recording' style of the audio here. Video of the lecture will be uploaded to the Cambridge History YouTube channel in the coming days.

    If you have any questions, suggestions or feedback, get in touch via @camericanist on Twitter or ltd27@cam.ac.uk. Spread the word, and thanks for listening!

    • 1 hr 13 min
    Peter Mancall on ‘The Origins of the American Economy’, 20/1/2020

    Peter Mancall on ‘The Origins of the American Economy’, 20/1/2020

    We're back after a long winter break. The dust has been blown off, our legs have been stretched, and the Cambridge American History Seminar is up and running again! This week Peter Mancall, Harmsworth Visiting Professor of American History at the University of Oxford for the academic year 2019-2020 and the Andrew W. Mellon Professor of the Humanities, Professor of History and Anthropology at the University of Southern California, talks to Lewis Defrates about his paper ‘The Origins of the American Economy’.

    The pair discuss about the four case studies used in the paper and the themes he explores to demonstrate the existing economies in North America, both indigenous and those generated through imperial encounters, prior to the foundation of Jamestown by English settlers in 1607. Professor Mancall also discusses the need to think about economic behaviour and structures outside that which is easily quantifiable, the historic importance of cumulative experience in the production of a ‘grammar of colonization’ on the part of European colonizers, and three of the most incredible archival experiences you’re likely to hear about any time soon.

    If you have any questions, suggestions or feedback, get in touch via @camericanist on Twitter or ltd27@cam.ac.uk. Spread the word, and thanks for listening!

    • 39 min
    Robert A. Schneider on 'The Rise and Fall of the “Resentment Paradigm” (ca 1935-1975)

    Robert A. Schneider on 'The Rise and Fall of the “Resentment Paradigm” (ca 1935-1975)

    Robert A. Schneider, a historian of early modern France at Indiana University Bloomington, and the former long-standing editor of the American Historical Review, talks to Lewis Defrates about his paper 'The Rise and Fall of the “Resentment Paradigm” (ca 1935-1975).

    The paper discusses the work of postwar intellectuals such as Richard Hofstadter, Daniel Bell, Seymour Martin Lipsett and Talcott Parsons, reframing their shared interest in the 'resentment' in the subjects they studied. Rob discusses the tenets this school of thought was built on (modernization theory, psychoanalysis, and consensus liberalism), the way this was articulated through their intellectual work, the repudiation of this work from the 1970s onwards, and the resurgence of an interest in resentment in the past half-decade.

    The paper encourages to rethink both the history of emotion and the production of knowledge regarding the history of emotions, demonstrating what these intellectuals missed in their pursuit of resentment and how today's academics can avoid these mistakes.

    If you have any questions, suggestions or feedback, get in touch via @camericanist on Twitter or ltd27@cam.ac.uk. Spread the word, and thanks for listening! See you... soon?

    • 30 min
    Katherine Paugh Interview 12/11/19

    Katherine Paugh Interview 12/11/19

    After a week away, we're back with another episode and another exciting and thought-provoking seminar paper!

    Katherine Paugh, an Associate Professor in North American Women’s History at Corpus Christi College at the University of Oxford, talks to Lewis Defrates about her paper '‘Race and Venereal Disease in the Atlantic World'. The paper explores racialized understandings of venereal diseases (particularly 'Yaws' and 'The Great Pox') in the long eighteenth century in Europe and the Caribbean.

    Professor Paugh explains the shift in approach towards inoculation in the Caribbean both before and after the abolition of slavery, the drive on the part of white plantation managers to keep Afro-Caribbean in the labour force, and particularly the connection between these themes and her previous book, "The Politics of Reproduction: Race, Medicine and Fertility in the Age of Abolition”.

    If you have any questions, suggestions or feedback, get in touch via @camericanist on Twitter or ltd27@cam.ac.uk. Spread the word, and thanks for listening! See you next week!

    Schedule for the Cambridge American History Seminar- https://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/seminars/american-history-seminar

    • 21 min

Top Podcasts In Education

Listeners Also Subscribed To