4 min

Can Music Actually Enhance Your Workout‪?‬ That's Healthy, Right?

    • Fitness

Does listening to music, something many of us do when we exercise, really do anything for your training performance?
Because it’s such a popular motivator in sports and fitness, it would only make sense that it does something to help. Or, is it magical thinking that your favorite tunes make you stronger or faster?
Get ready for some good news — and some bad — about how music may affect your workout.
In this episode of That’s Healthy, Right?, we’ll dig into the research on whether or not music helps increase your maximum strength, how it may actually boost the number of reps you can do, help you push a little bit harder, run a little bit farther, and even recover faster.
To ask a question, read the transcript, or learn more, visit bornfitness.com/thats-healthy-right.
Don’t forget to Subscribe to the show, and Rate or Review wherever you tune in!
Resources:
The Psychophysiological Effects of Different Tempo Music on Endurance Versus High-Intensity Performances — Frontiers in Psychology
Ergogenic and psychological effects of synchronous music during circuit-type exercise — Psychology of Sport and Exercise
The effects of music tempo and loudness level on treadmill exercise — Ergonomics
Can Listening to Music Improve Your Workout? — National Center for Health Research 
Revisiting the exercise heart rate-music tempo preference relationship — Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
Effect of different musical tempo on post-exercise recovery in young adults — Indian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology
Effects of self-selected music on maximal bench press strength and strength endurance — Perceptual and Motor Skills
Effects of self-selected music on strength, explosiveness, and mood — Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research 
The effect of music during warm-up on consecutive anaerobic performance in elite adolescent volleyball players —  International Journal of Sports Medicine
Music Mindset: Don’t Wait for Tomorrow — Born Fitness

Does listening to music, something many of us do when we exercise, really do anything for your training performance?
Because it’s such a popular motivator in sports and fitness, it would only make sense that it does something to help. Or, is it magical thinking that your favorite tunes make you stronger or faster?
Get ready for some good news — and some bad — about how music may affect your workout.
In this episode of That’s Healthy, Right?, we’ll dig into the research on whether or not music helps increase your maximum strength, how it may actually boost the number of reps you can do, help you push a little bit harder, run a little bit farther, and even recover faster.
To ask a question, read the transcript, or learn more, visit bornfitness.com/thats-healthy-right.
Don’t forget to Subscribe to the show, and Rate or Review wherever you tune in!
Resources:
The Psychophysiological Effects of Different Tempo Music on Endurance Versus High-Intensity Performances — Frontiers in Psychology
Ergogenic and psychological effects of synchronous music during circuit-type exercise — Psychology of Sport and Exercise
The effects of music tempo and loudness level on treadmill exercise — Ergonomics
Can Listening to Music Improve Your Workout? — National Center for Health Research 
Revisiting the exercise heart rate-music tempo preference relationship — Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
Effect of different musical tempo on post-exercise recovery in young adults — Indian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology
Effects of self-selected music on maximal bench press strength and strength endurance — Perceptual and Motor Skills
Effects of self-selected music on strength, explosiveness, and mood — Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research 
The effect of music during warm-up on consecutive anaerobic performance in elite adolescent volleyball players —  International Journal of Sports Medicine
Music Mindset: Don’t Wait for Tomorrow — Born Fitness

4 min