50 episodes

Founded in 1981, the University of Virginia's Carter G. Woodson Institute for African-American and African Studies is named in honor of native Virginian Carter Godwin Woodson. Woodson was instrumental in bringing professional recognition to the study of African-American history during a period when most historians held the opinion that African Americans were a people without history. Our primary goal at the Carter G. Woodson Institute is to continue the pioneering work of our namesake through an active program of undergraduate teaching and curriculum development; original interdisciplinary research; institutional and financial support of scholars; conferences and colloquia; publications and public outreach projects.

Carter G. Woodson Institute University of Virginia

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Founded in 1981, the University of Virginia's Carter G. Woodson Institute for African-American and African Studies is named in honor of native Virginian Carter Godwin Woodson. Woodson was instrumental in bringing professional recognition to the study of African-American history during a period when most historians held the opinion that African Americans were a people without history. Our primary goal at the Carter G. Woodson Institute is to continue the pioneering work of our namesake through an active program of undergraduate teaching and curriculum development; original interdisciplinary research; institutional and financial support of scholars; conferences and colloquia; publications and public outreach projects.

    Race, Wealth, and College Admissions

    Race, Wealth, and College Admissions

    From the "Currents in Conversation" forum held at the Carter G. Woodson Institute.

    • 1 hr 49 min
    • video
    50th Anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington at UVa

    50th Anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington at UVa

    From the range of voices that joined together Wednesday to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, it’s safe to say the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s celebrated “dream” of racial justice and equality from his famous speech that day remains vivid in the University of Virginia community.

    At the same time, those voices concurred that the dream is far from fulfilled 50 years later.

    To mark the occasion of the 1963 March on Washington, the University held two events: U.Va.’s Office of the Vice President and Chief Officer for Diversity and Equity hosted “Let Freedom Ring at U.Va.,” in the Rotunda Dome Room; and later, the Carter G. Woodson Institute of African-American and African Studies held an event with more than 30 participants expressing ways to revitalize the purpose of King’s speech, which emphasized the need for jobs and justice.

    • 4 min
    The March@50: Deborah McDowell

    The March@50: Deborah McDowell

    Bells pealed around the world on Aug. 28, 2013 at 3 p.m. – including those at the University of Virginia’s Chapel – to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech, part of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

    The Carter G. Woodson Institute of African-American and African Studies hosted the event, "The March@50," focusing on ways to revitalize the purpose of King’s speech, which emphasized the need for jobs and justice. That gathering was held in the auditorium of the Mary and David Harrison Institute for American History, Literature and Culture/Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library.

    Participants in the discussion included Frank Dukes, director of the Institute for Environmental Negotiation, based in the School of Architecture, and executive director of University and Community Action for Racial Equity; U.Va. students from the Black Student Alliance; Kristin Szakos, vice mayor of Charlottesville; Andrea Douglass of the Jefferson Heritage Center; Jim Bundy of Sojourners United Church of Christ; and representatives from the Living Wage Campaign. The participants offered their interpretations in any format they chose – in spoken words, song, dance, instrumental performance, etc., said Deborah McDowell, director of the Woodson Institute and Alice Griffin Professor of English.

    “My colleagues and I are envisioning this as an occasion to do more than memorialize the speech and reiterate its famous references to the ‘color of their skin’ and ‘the content of their character,’” McDowell said. “Rather, I thought we’d want to see this event as an opportunity – dare I say, an obligation? – to rethink the speech and attempt to re-invigorate its meanings and its promises, as well as the original purpose behind the march.

    “Let’s not forget that this was the ‘March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.’ The rhetoric of dreaming sometimes eclipses the call for jobs and freedom,” she said.

    • 2 min
    The March@50: Camisha Jones

    The March@50: Camisha Jones

    Bells pealed around the world on Aug. 28, 2013 at 3 p.m. – including those at the University of Virginia’s Chapel – to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech, part of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

    The Carter G. Woodson Institute of African-American and African Studies hosted the event, "The March@50," focusing on ways to revitalize the purpose of King’s speech, which emphasized the need for jobs and justice. That gathering was held in the auditorium of the Mary and David Harrison Institute for American History, Literature and Culture/Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library.

    Participants in the discussion included Frank Dukes, director of the Institute for Environmental Negotiation, based in the School of Architecture, and executive director of University and Community Action for Racial Equity; U.Va. students from the Black Student Alliance; Kristin Szakos, vice mayor of Charlottesville; Andrea Douglass of the Jefferson Heritage Center; Jim Bundy of Sojourners United Church of Christ; and representatives from the Living Wage Campaign. The participants offered their interpretations in any format they chose – in spoken words, song, dance, instrumental performance, etc., said Deborah McDowell, director of the Woodson Institute and Alice Griffin Professor of English.

    “My colleagues and I are envisioning this as an occasion to do more than memorialize the speech and reiterate its famous references to the ‘color of their skin’ and ‘the content of their character,’” McDowell said. “Rather, I thought we’d want to see this event as an opportunity – dare I say, an obligation? – to rethink the speech and attempt to re-invigorate its meanings and its promises, as well as the original purpose behind the march.

    “Let’s not forget that this was the ‘March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.’ The rhetoric of dreaming sometimes eclipses the call for jobs and freedom,” she said.

    • 4 min
    The March@50: FREE

    The March@50: FREE

    Bells pealed around the world on Aug. 28, 2013 at 3 p.m. – including those at the University of Virginia’s Chapel – to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech, part of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

    The Carter G. Woodson Institute of African-American and African Studies hosted the event, "The March@50," focusing on ways to revitalize the purpose of King’s speech, which emphasized the need for jobs and justice. That gathering was held in the auditorium of the Mary and David Harrison Institute for American History, Literature and Culture/Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library.

    Participants in the discussion included Frank Dukes, director of the Institute for Environmental Negotiation, based in the School of Architecture, and executive director of University and Community Action for Racial Equity; U.Va. students from the Black Student Alliance; Kristin Szakos, vice mayor of Charlottesville; Andrea Douglass of the Jefferson Heritage Center; Jim Bundy of Sojourners United Church of Christ; and representatives from the Living Wage Campaign. The participants offered their interpretations in any format they chose – in spoken words, song, dance, instrumental performance, etc., said Deborah McDowell, director of the Woodson Institute and Alice Griffin Professor of English.

    “My colleagues and I are envisioning this as an occasion to do more than memorialize the speech and reiterate its famous references to the ‘color of their skin’ and ‘the content of their character,’” McDowell said. “Rather, I thought we’d want to see this event as an opportunity – dare I say, an obligation? – to rethink the speech and attempt to re-invigorate its meanings and its promises, as well as the original purpose behind the march.

    “Let’s not forget that this was the ‘March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.’ The rhetoric of dreaming sometimes eclipses the call for jobs and freedom,” she said.

    • 13 min
    The March@50: Eden Zekarias

    The March@50: Eden Zekarias

    Bells pealed around the world on Aug. 28, 2013 at 3 p.m. – including those at the University of Virginia’s Chapel – to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech, part of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

    The Carter G. Woodson Institute of African-American and African Studies hosted the event, "The March@50," focusing on ways to revitalize the purpose of King’s speech, which emphasized the need for jobs and justice. That gathering was held in the auditorium of the Mary and David Harrison Institute for American History, Literature and Culture/Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library.

    Participants in the discussion included Frank Dukes, director of the Institute for Environmental Negotiation, based in the School of Architecture, and executive director of University and Community Action for Racial Equity; U.Va. students from the Black Student Alliance; Kristin Szakos, vice mayor of Charlottesville; Andrea Douglass of the Jefferson Heritage Center; Jim Bundy of Sojourners United Church of Christ; and representatives from the Living Wage Campaign. The participants offered their interpretations in any format they chose – in spoken words, song, dance, instrumental performance, etc., said Deborah McDowell, director of the Woodson Institute and Alice Griffin Professor of English.

    “My colleagues and I are envisioning this as an occasion to do more than memorialize the speech and reiterate its famous references to the ‘color of their skin’ and ‘the content of their character,’” McDowell said. “Rather, I thought we’d want to see this event as an opportunity – dare I say, an obligation? – to rethink the speech and attempt to re-invigorate its meanings and its promises, as well as the original purpose behind the march.

    “Let’s not forget that this was the ‘March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.’ The rhetoric of dreaming sometimes eclipses the call for jobs and freedom,” she said.

    • 6 min

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