24 episodes

The Huntington hosts the East Asian Garden Lecture series, spanning topics and discussions by prominent speakers about gardens across the Pacific.

Center for East Asian Garden Studies The Huntington

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The Huntington hosts the East Asian Garden Lecture series, spanning topics and discussions by prominent speakers about gardens across the Pacific.

    Border-Crossing Botanicals: The Curious History of Saffron in Japan

    Border-Crossing Botanicals: The Curious History of Saffron in Japan

    Susan Burns, professor of history at the University of Chicago, explores the incorporation of saffron into Japanese pharmacology, a complex process that involved the rise of natural science and a "productive confusion" that linked saffron with other botanicals. This program is part of the East Asian Garden Lecture series.

    Sino-Buddhist Medicine: A Missing Link in the Global History of Medicine

    Sino-Buddhist Medicine: A Missing Link in the Global History of Medicine

    C. Pierce Salguero, associate professor of Asian History and Religious Studies at Penn State Abington, provides an introduction to the principles of Sino-Buddhist medicine, the product of centuries of cross-cultural exchange between medieval India and China, with particular focus on pharmacology and medicinal plants. This program is part of the East Asian Garden Lecture series.

    A Whimsical Picture with a Grim Message: The Inshoku yōjō kagami and the Imagination of the Body in Early Modern Japan

    A Whimsical Picture with a Grim Message: The Inshoku yōjō kagami and the Imagination of the Body in Early Modern Japan

    Shigehisa Kuriyama, professor of cultural history at Harvard University, discusses the Inshoku yōjō kagami(Rules of Dietary Life), a Japanese woodblock print produced around 1850. The image appears to whimsically depict the traditional East Asian view of the body, but it in fact reflects the transformative impact of Western medicine and the rise of the money economy. Properly understood, says Kuriyama, no other single image reveals more about the hidden depths of embodied life in early modern Japan. This program is part of the East Asian Garden Lecture series.

    The Ecology of Eternity in a Song-Dynasty Buddhist Monastery

    The Ecology of Eternity in a Song-Dynasty Buddhist Monastery

    In his inaugural Huntington lecture, Phillip Bloom, The Huntington’s new director of the Center for East Asian Garden Studies and curator of the Chinese Garden, examines the history of Shizhuanshan, a hilltop Buddhist sanctuary in southwestern China constructed in the late 11th century. Bloom argues that, at Shizhuanshan, architecture, image, and text work together to transform the natural environment itself into a site for the eternal performance of Buddhist ritual.


    Recorded Nov. 21, 2017.

    Rediscovered Botanical Treasures from the Smithsonian and the Hunt Institute

    Rediscovered Botanical Treasures from the Smithsonian and the Hunt Institute

    Lugene Bruno, curator of Carnegie Mellon's Hunt Institute, and Alice Tangerini, curator of botanical art at the Smithsonian Institution, present an illustrated lecture on recently rediscovered artworks long forgotten in their archives. These botanical illustrations represent significant historical and scientific findings of an earlier era.


    Recorded Nov. 5, 2017.

    Cartographic Traditions in East Asian Maps

    Cartographic Traditions in East Asian Maps

    Richard Pegg, Asian art curator of the private MacLean Collection in Chicago, discusses the similarities and differences in representations of space, both real and imagined, in early modern maps created in China, Korea, and Japan. He also examines the introduction of European map-making techniques into Asian cartographic traditions. This talk is part of the East Asian Garden Lecture Series at The Huntington.


    Recorded September 5, 2017.

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