22 episodes

Ceteris Never Paribus: The History of Economic Thought Podcast covers diverse topics from the history of economics, economic thought, and economic ideas such as new research and methodological questions.

Ceteris Never Paribus: The History of Economic Thought Podcast Ceteris Never Paribus

    • Social Sciences
    • 4.5 • 6 Ratings

Ceteris Never Paribus: The History of Economic Thought Podcast covers diverse topics from the history of economics, economic thought, and economic ideas such as new research and methodological questions.

    Marginalised Voices

    Marginalised Voices

    Guests: Jaci Eisenberg, Gerardo Serra and Sharmin KhodaijiHosted and produced by Maria Bach















    In this episode, Maria interviews three scholars who study underrepresented or what she calls marginalised voices in the history of policy and economics. They discuss why they came to study such lesser known figures and how the research can give us new perspectives. They also share the difficulties and constraints that they face. Jaci Eisenberg studied American women who contributed to the League of Nations. Gerardo Serra studies the history of economics and statistics in 20th century Ghana. Sharmin Khodaiji researches the institutionalisation of political economy in India. Listen to find out more about their research!

    • 51 min
    Till Düppe on Economics in the German Democratic Republic (East Germany), Episode 21

    Till Düppe on Economics in the German Democratic Republic (East Germany), Episode 21

    Guest: Till DüppeHosted and produced by Reinhard Schumacher















    In this episode, Till Düppe talks with Reinhard about the development of Economics in the German Democratic Republic (GDR), better known as East Germany – a state that existed from 1948 until 1990. We discuss Till’s general approach of historical epistemology of economics before discussing in detail the development of Marxist-Leninist economics in the GDR from its beginning to its abrupt end in 1990. Till also compares this system of knowledge with economics before and after the GDR. Additionally, we discuss some methodological approaches, such as Karl Mannheim’s concept of generations and institutional history.







    Till is an associate professor at the Department of Economics Sciences at the Université du Québec à Montréal.









    Articles by Till Düppe mentioned in this episode:









    Border Cases Between Autonomy and Relevance: Economic Sciences in Berlin – A Natural Experiment, Studies in History and Philosophy of Science, 2015.The Generation of the GDR: Economists at the Humboldt University of Berlin Caught Between Loyalty and Relevance, History of the Human Sciences, 2017.A Science Show Debate: How the Stasi Staged Revisionism, Contemporary European History, 2020.











    Also mentioned in this episode is Episode 12 with Adam Leeds on the Development of Soviet and Russian Economics.

    • 1 hr 10 min
    Parenting in Academia

    Parenting in Academia

    Hosts: Maria Bach and Reinhard SchumacherProduction: Maria Bach















    In this episode, we interview Beatrice Cherrier to talk about what it is like being a parent in academia - the ups, the downs and all the things we can do to make life and work easier.

    • 1 hr 5 min
    South Asian Intellectual History with Andrew Sartori, Episode 19

    South Asian Intellectual History with Andrew Sartori, Episode 19

    Guest: Andrew SartoriHosted and produced by Maria Bach















    In this episode, Maria shares a recent interview with Andrew Sartori, an intellectual historian at NYU. Andrew discusses his work in South Asian Intellectual History and how he ended up in this relatively small field when he started. He also talks about how he deals with the international diffusion of ideas. Finally, they debate the need to find a distinct Indian way of thinking and how this perceived need makes it hard to research in this area of study. Check out his publications here.

    • 51 min
    Dennis Rasmussen on David Hume and Adam Smith, Episode 18

    Dennis Rasmussen on David Hume and Adam Smith, Episode 18

    Guest: Dennis RasmussenHosted and produced by Reinhard Schumacher















    In this episode, Dennis Rasmussen talks with Reinhard about David Hume and Adam Smith. The episode focuses on Dennis’s book The Infidel and the Professor: David Hume, Adam Smith, and the Friendship that Shaped Modern Thought. We discuss the Scottish Enlightenment, Hume’s and Smith’s lives, their mutual influence, and friendship in science. Additionally, Dennis talks about Adam Smith and economic inequality, as well as writing for a broader academic audience and for the general public.







    Dennis is a professor of Political Science at the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University. His research is mostly in the history of political thought.















    Books and articles by Dennis Rasmussen mentioned in this episode:







    The Infidel and the Professor: David Hume, Adam Smith, and the Friendship that Shaped Modern ThoughtAdam Smith and the Death of David Hume The Letter to Strahan and Related TextsThe Problems and Promise of Commercial Society Adam Smith's Response to RousseauAdam Smith on What Is Wrong with Economic Inequality, American Political Science ReviewThe Problem With Inequality, According to Adam Smith, The AtlanticDoes “Bettering Our Condition” Really Make Us Better Off? Adam Smith on Progress and Happiness, American Political Science Review

    • 1 hr 18 min
    The Mont Pelerin Society and the Origins of Neoliberalism with Ola Innset, Episode 17

    The Mont Pelerin Society and the Origins of Neoliberalism with Ola Innset, Episode 17

    Guest: Ola InnsetHosted and produced by Erwin Dekker and Reinhard Schumacher















    In this episode we interview the historian Ola Innset about his award-winning dissertation Reinventing liberalism : Early neoliberalism in context, 1920-1947. He has used the methodology of micro-history to study the first meeting of the Mont Pelerin Society in 1947, including 'juicy' details. We discuss Ola's thesis of the double movement: neoliberalism as response to both planning and the old ideal of laissez-faire. But the conversation turns much broader about the international character of neoliberalism, the uses and abuses of the term, as well as its contemporary relevance. And we discuss other recent literature on neoliberalism including that of Quinn Slobodian and Peter Boettke.







    In a piece for the Baffler Ola has described his own visit to the Mont Pelerin Hotel where the conference took place.In a spin-off article has has explored the relations between Friedrich Hayek and Karl (!) Polanyi, which contains a continuation of the discussion about economic calculation in the podcast.

    • 53 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
6 Ratings

6 Ratings

Gentlemen of Philadelphia ,

Interesting podcast, terrible audio quality

While the topics are interesting, in some of episodes the audio quality is too poor to follow

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