52 episodes

ArtCenter College of Design’s bi-weekly podcast features intimate interviews with leading artists examining the ideas fueling their work and how the creative process can be a catalyst for change—personally, professionally and globally. Hosted by ArtCenter President, Lorne M. Buchman, these conversations examine the many ways in which artists and designers are enriching our lives. ArtCenter College of Design is a global leader in art and design education; and our mission statement—Learn to create. Influence change—lies at the center of all we do.

Change Lab: Conversations on Transformation and Creativit‪y‬ ArtCenter College of Design, hosted by ArtCenter President Lorne M. Buchman

    • Design
    • 5.0 • 54 Ratings

ArtCenter College of Design’s bi-weekly podcast features intimate interviews with leading artists examining the ideas fueling their work and how the creative process can be a catalyst for change—personally, professionally and globally. Hosted by ArtCenter President, Lorne M. Buchman, these conversations examine the many ways in which artists and designers are enriching our lives. ArtCenter College of Design is a global leader in art and design education; and our mission statement—Learn to create. Influence change—lies at the center of all we do.

    Occidental College President Harry Elam on finding a roadmap for systemic change in revolutionary theater movements

    Occidental College President Harry Elam on finding a roadmap for systemic change in revolutionary theater movements

    Harry Elam and Lorne had only met casually before we sat down to record this episode of Change Lab. Interestingly, they had spent much of their early careers as two ships passing in the San Francisco Bay. Harry pursued his PhD in theater at U.C. Berkeley while Lorne earned the same degree at Stanford. They then traded places and Harry became a theater professor at Stanford and Lorne took a faculty position in Berkeley’s Dramatic Art department. 
    Their mirrored movements continue to this day. With Harry’s recent appointment as president of Occidental College, they now both serve as college presidents for venerable institutions located just a few miles apart in Northeast Los Angeles.
    This past year, maybe more than any other, has called upon them to draw on skills they developed in the theater. They’ve had to improvise and lean into the unfolding drama, responding to challenges with ‘yes and’ rather than ‘no but.’ 
    Harry has written several books and scores of journal articles on how theater has become a vehicle for social change. He and Lorne discussed how those movements might even serve as a model for progress within the very institutions they both lead. Their conversation shed light on the importance of communal spirit—not unlike that of a theater company—in forging the path ahead. 
    But, in the end, they were just two theater guys connecting around their shared belief in the power of creativity and education as well as in our conviction that, above all else, the show must go on.
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    • 53 min
    D’Wayne Edwards on building a pipeline for diversity in sneaker design

    D’Wayne Edwards on building a pipeline for diversity in sneaker design

    D’Wayne has a lot in common with Michael Jordan, his former boss. His appetite for excellence has propelled him to superlative success. D’Wayne turned his childhood passion for drawing sneakers into a high-flying design career, moving from L.A. Gear to Sketchers and then eventually landing his dream job at Nike’s Jordan Brand. D’Wayne’s designs have, in total, earned over $1.5 billion.
    But D’Wayne was determined to leave a mark on the footwear design world that couldn’t be measured in dollars. As one of very few Black leaders in his business, he saw an opportunity to create a pipeline for diverse designers.
    D’Wayne quit his job at Nike to launch Pensole Footwear Design Academy in order to build career pathways that didn’t exist when he was coming of age. Pensole is now an established force in footwear design education, providing a host of immersive programs in partnership with ArtCenter and other institutions. The results speak for themselves: Pensole had a hand in training over 500 footwear designers working today.
    In this debut episode of Change Lab’s new season investigating the future of education, D’Wayne reflects on the importance of mentorship, hard work, and hands-on learning in creating a more diverse and sustainable design education model.
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    • 54 min
    Change Lab Season 8: Reinventing Education

    Change Lab Season 8: Reinventing Education

    As we begin a new year and a new season of change lab, I think most of us are torn between looking forward with hope and looking back with a kind of weary amazement we've prevailed over enormous obstacles in the last year. But as educators and designers, we know all too well that every challenge we meet offers an opportunity for learning and progress.
    That was certainly the case here at ArtCenter, where we migrated along with the rest of our colleagues and higher ed to digital classrooms, we then did what we do best experimenting, prototyping, iterating, and inventing until we found what worked best for our faculty and students.
    Not only has the experience taught us invaluable lessons about the grit and creative adaptability of our own community, but we've also made important discoveries about the nature of education itself.
    That's why we're dedicating this season of change lab to exploring the future of education. Beginning on February 17th. We'll look at what we've learned, where we're headed and how to get there.
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    • 2 min
    Elle Hearns on Leading a Movement for Black Trans Lives

    Elle Hearns on Leading a Movement for Black Trans Lives

    Elle Hearns did not set out to lead movements for social justice. Nor was it her lifelong dream to make the world a better and safer place for Black transgender communities. Growing up in Ohio, she imagined herself as an iconic singer, a chart-topping diva with a voice powerful enough to crack your soul wide open. 
    In the end, she did end up using the power of her voice to inspire people -- just not in the way she originally planned. As one of the world’s most effective leaders in the movement for social change, Elle has dedicated her life to organizing and advocating for marginalized communities. She began her career working on campaigns for marriage equality and don’t-ask-don’t-tell policy change. She then transitioned to groundbreaking work as a leading voice for the Black Lives Matter Global Network. In her current role as the founder and executive director of the Marsha P. Johnson Institute, she’s dedicated herself to protecting and defending the human rights of Black transgender people. 
    Under Elle’s leadership, the Marsha P. Johnson Institute has become a vital resource for Black trans women in particular, who have suffered an onslaught of violent attacks resulting in alarmingly low life expectancy rates. Elle has focused on raising awareness, advocating for policy change and marshalling resources to provide pathways to stability. Her work has generated widespread media attention toward the plight of Black trans women in the pages of Vogue and The LA Times. The Institute also recently received a $500,000 gift from Google earmarked for COVID relief. 
    Among Elle’s many remarkable qualities is her ability to apply a strategic mindset toward affecting change within her own besieged community. But it’s the strength of Elle’s voice -- what she says and how she says it -- that remains her most powerful tool in her efforts to build a better world for all its inhabitants.
    Links
    The Marsha P. Johnson Institute
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    • 53 min
    Grace Lynne Haynes on painting to redefine darkness and light

    Grace Lynne Haynes on painting to redefine darkness and light

    Grace Lynne Haynes’ creative calling didn’t announce itself until she set foot in her first college painting class. But from that moment forward, Grace’s artistic destiny came through loud and clear, as unmistakable as a spiritual epiphany.
    Here’s how she describes it: “It almost reactivated my physical senses. I felt as if colors were brighter, senses were stronger. I just felt like my passion for life began to come back again. I knew that I had to be doing this for a living."
    She poured that passion into her painting practice as an Illustration student at ArtCenter, where she cultivated the signature style that quickly translated into a thriving career as a professional painter and illustrator. 
    Her works are striking and instantly recognizable, at least partially because you’ve probably seen them on the cover of The New Yorker, which has featured two of her illustrations in the past eight months. She’s also recently graced the pages of Vogue, ELLE and The Washington Post.
    The vibrancy of her bright color schemes and rich skin tones, which she describes as “pitch black,” offer a counter-narrative to the negative connotations placed on the very idea of darkness. Grace’s brush strokes depict a better world, one where light and dark coexist harmoniously in brightly hued images that celebrate contrast.
    Grace’s career launched like a rocket the moment she graduated from ArtCenter. She was selected to be an inaugural member of Kehinde Wiley’s Black Rock Senegal residency and was included in Forbes “30 Under 30” list under Art and Style.
    In many respects, Grace is now living her dream along with that of most every young artist. But perhaps most admirable is her commitment to pursuing a creative practice that reflects her deeply-held values.

    https://www.bygracelynne.com/
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    • 48 min
    Change Lab Presents: Micheaux Mission

    Change Lab Presents: Micheaux Mission

    Throughout this season, on alternating weeks, we’ll feature a handpicked episode from podcasts by, for or about the Black community.
    This week we’re excited to share an episode from the Micheaux Mission. Since 2016, Len Webb and Vincent Williams have been challenging themselves to watch and review every Black feature film ever made and released to theaters.
    In Vincent's words, they hope to give 'Rolling Stone' style examination to these under appreciated works of art. Together they hope to find the perfect wine to drink with Pam Grier's Coffy, the five movies, since 1985, in which Samuel L. Jackson does not appear, and someone else who agrees with Len that The Last Dragon is a bad movie.
    The Micheaux Mission is named for Oscar Micheaux, regarded as the first major African-American feature filmmaker and the most successful African-American filmmaker of the first half of the twentieth century. 
    Len and Vincent have spent the last few years bringing the good word of Black film to the masses in a fun and engaging way. Along the way, they have been featured in The Philadelphia Tribune, Houston Chronicle, Radio New Zealand and won the Expression in Radio Award at the 2019 PhillyCam Cammy Awards.
    Today’s episode features the 2012 film, An Oversimplification of Her Beauty. According to the Micheaux Mission, Writer/director Terence Nance has created a literal poem of a movie, a heartfelt exploration of one man's feeling for his homie-lover-friend, that has enthralled Vince and Len unlike any film before on the Mission.
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    • 1 hr 5 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
54 Ratings

54 Ratings

Pasadena Feminist ,

Inspiring podcasts on creativity

When I need inspiration I turn to Change Lab as one of the podcasts where I can find it. I am incredibly grateful ArtCenter College of Design started the podcasts with its velvet-voiced intelligent President Dr Lorne Buchman.

Clarisse Gomez ,

Awesome Podcast!!!

Lorne, host of the Change Lab podcast, highlights all aspects of creativity, transformation and more in this can’t miss podcast! The host and expert guests offer insightful advice and information that is helpful to anyone that listens!

alexandralala ,

Expertly produced, inspiring content.

Expertly produced, interesting and inspiring content, and a wonderful and diverse mix of guests. Especially like the way the Lorne easily talks about design and process and love the rich sounds mixed it. Looking forward to next season!

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