164 episodes

A mature, millennial-infused film/tv discussion podcast from Melvin & Dan. Influenced by Acts 17 and Romans 2:4. Podcast Magazine says Cinematic Doctrine "uses the shared value of human life as a springboard into deeper conversations". // CinematicDoctrine.com

Cinematic Doctrine CINDOC

    • Religion & Spirituality
    • 4.8 • 16 Ratings

A mature, millennial-infused film/tv discussion podcast from Melvin & Dan. Influenced by Acts 17 and Romans 2:4. Podcast Magazine says Cinematic Doctrine "uses the shared value of human life as a springboard into deeper conversations". // CinematicDoctrine.com

    Nosferatu - A Hundred Years of Frights!

    Nosferatu - A Hundred Years of Frights!

    MOVIE DISCUSSION:

    Stephen and Melvin are joined by Shirleon to discuss the highly revered classic vampire film Nosferatu, a film with a 100-year legacy!

    Topics: 
    (PATREON EXCLUSIVE) 30-minutes talking about our October/Halloween plans, from movies to habits! (PATREON EXCLUSIVE) Nosferatu is a very simple movie about a vampire, a man, and his wife.This was Shirleon's second time watching Nosferatu. The first time was great. The second time... not so much.Stephen observed how Nosferatu can feel slow and boring for a modern audience, yet also feels Nosferatu is an effective film overall.Melvin had a unique experience in which he was confronted with his mortality. Why? Because everyone involved in Nosferatu, from its conception, plagiarism, and preservation is dead.Nosferatu is shot during a time when movies were "plays on film", and thus didn't contain the same freedoms and creativities we are now accustomed to movies that separate themselves from the stage.Count Orlock is grotesquely charismatic, parading the film with a transfixing nature.Discussing the hardship of film preservation and audience engagement for a film that is both pre-talkie and had a court case resulting in the destruction of all original film negatives.Back in the days of yore, black and white films could be colored by painting on the film itself, and musicians could perform original music for the film based upon their talents and interpretations. With this in mind, the concept of preserving the "original experience" of older films becomes far more complicated, as it cuts down as deep as regional and local creativity.Nosferatu seems to present a message around the overbearing presence of predator vs prey, from not only a man vs man angle (Hutter vs Orlock) but also man vs nature (the town vs the plague). Primarily, it seems Nosferatu is expressing a horror unique to nature.Despite Count Orlock's diabolical design, there is still an expressionistic depiction of sensuality throughout Nosferatu.Recommendations:
    Frankenstein (1931) (Movie), or any other classic Universal Monsters movie.Absentia (2011) (Movie)And I Darken by Kiersten White (Book)Support on Patreon for Unique Perks! 
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    • 1 hr 12 min
    Oculus - Decent Despite Disappointments

    Oculus - Decent Despite Disappointments

    PATREON MOVIE DISCUSSION: 

    This movie was selected by our Patreon Supporters over at the Cinematic Doctrine Patreon. Support as little as $3 a month and have your voice heard! 

    If you've seen The Haunting of Hill House/Bly Manor or Midnight Mass, you've seen director Mike Flanagan's work! However, for this episode we're traveling back to 2013 to discuss one of his earliest projects, Oculus! 

    Topics: 
    (PATREON EXCLUSIVE) 40-minutes talking about the complicated dynamics of modern movie watching like watching on airplanes, cell phones, the gym, or doing dishes. Also, the concept of director, producer, editor, or alternative cuts to movies. (PATREON EXCLUSIVE) Daniel has watched more Mike Flanagan projects than Melvin. Melvin is curious if he's noticed a style or focus of Flanagan across each project. Oculus is a fairly simple visual experience of reliving family trauma, but there isn't a whole lot else going on from start to finish. The concept of cursed objects, things or tools having an effect on life in malicious ways not intended, is extremely cool. Despite this, the mirror as a cursed object has little presence. Most every criticism Melvin and Daniel levy at the film feel sourced in young, undeveloped directing talent, which Mike Flanagan has likely improved since working on this 2013 film. Melvin has extreme criticisms for both the original score and the cinematography for the film, finding both to be wholly uninspired. Daniel, "[Oculus] moved between being kind of interesting and then being just kind of unpleasant because of the subject matter."Discussing the "unreliable narrator" aspect of the film's second and third act, which people will either love or hate about Oculus.The world of film, especially horror, uses poor mental health for its complicating incident, or to add flavor to its storyline. How do we feel about that?Recommendations: 
     Amazing Grace: 366 Inspiring Hymn Stories for Daily DevotionsCheck out the Shout! Factory catalog and maybe buy a Collector's Edition of your favorite movie!The Unbearable Weight of Massive Talent (Movie)Support on Patreon for Unique Perks! 
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    • 1 hr 1 min
    The Blackcoat's Daughter - The Horror of Spiritual Loneliness

    The Blackcoat's Daughter - The Horror of Spiritual Loneliness

    MOVIE DISCUSSION: 

    Melvin & Dan talk about one of Mel's favorite movies, The Blackcoat's Daughter, perhaps the most painstakingly slow burning, brooding mood slashers ever made. Also, Melvin gets really honest about why he loves The Blackcoat's Daughter so much.

    Topics: 
    Melvin has wanted Daniel to watch The Blackcoat's Daughter since they started the podcast. Finally, it happened. The Blackcoat's Daughter shows various aspects of alienation, loneliness, and general social dysfunction despite its small cast. Despite The Blackcoat's Daughter being set at a spiritually indistinguishable denominational school, an aesthetic choice likely chosen to add flavor to the horror, Melvin finds himself deeply connecting with the general atmosphere present within the film. The structure of The Blackcoat's Daughter is extremely subtle, with even its timeline giving small yet pivotal narrative clues. Daniel read that Ozgood Perkins wanted the film to be about loneliness, which as stated before clearly comes through the film. The Blackcoat's Daughter lends itself well to rewatching, both in shedding light on the narrative, and introducing more curiosities. When either a secular or religious person has no support system, they are prone to fill the void of community, companionship, and intimacy with risky and dangerous solutions often because those are easier or simpler to implement than an entire social structure. Melvin feels The Blackcoat's Daughter displays a convincing, gentle, yet clear perspective as to why one may be attracted to evil, and he feels the film can help bring a sense of clarity and compassion toward an otherwise contentious subject matter.There's a really strong dream-like logic to The Blackcoat's Daughter in which things don't necessarily make real-world sense but heavily improve the film's overall tone.Daniel, "Helping somebody who's [overtly] choosing something other than God; that's a tough one. Because there's something about the thing they're choosing that calls to them uniquely."Melvin, "In terms of [The Blackcoat's Daughter], a resolution to loneliness is companionship. But learning... learning to be a good friend is hard."Recommendations: 
    Global Impact Bible: ESVFind and visit your local pop-up Spirit Halloween!Young Justice (Show) & Batman: The Brave and the Bold (Show)Support on Patreon for Unique Perks! 
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    • 1 hr 20 min
    The Seventh Seal - A Classical Meditation on Life and Death

    The Seventh Seal - A Classical Meditation on Life and Death

    MOVIE DISCUSSION: 

    Stephen McFerron, new contributor to Cinematic Doctrine (read him here!), joins Melvin again to discuss a pivotal film in the art-house canon: The Seventh Seal! 

    Topics: 
    (PATREON EXCLUSIVE) 50-minutes of Melvin and Stephen detailing their lifelong journey through movies, from the extremely good to the horrendously terrible, and everything in between (PATREON EXCLUSIVE) Being our second Criterion-themed episode in a row, Melvin and Stephen joyfully discuss the Criterion Collection. The Seventh Seal is a movie that is intrinsically focused on and explores facets of death.The Seventh Seal's tone is very challenging as it expertly switches between extremely clever comedy and absolutely petrifying horror. Stephen, "The Seventh Seal puts a weight on death that is actually... actually makes the viewer try to grapple with the idea that they're going to die one day, too." A unique, tender tragedy to The Seventh Seal is the lament regarding the want to believe in something, although not believing in it. Melvin feels this is adjacent to the lament unique to faith, that one believes something they cannot see, but yearns earnestly to see it true. Stephen shares what it is about the end of the movie that convinced him to watch it over and over. Talking about the pseudo-communion scene between Antonius Block, Jof, Mia, Jöns, and the Girl. Is there room for frustration and doubt in the Christian life? At the time of watching The Seventh Seal and recording for this episode, Melvin was in the midst of the Book of Job, so he turns there for some insight. Recommendations: 
    The Book of Job (Bible)Norm Macdonald: Nothing Special (Comedy Special)Support on Patreon for Unique Perks! 
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    • 1 hr 16 min
    Stalker - A Slow-Burn, Spiritualistic, Science-Fiction Masterpiece

    Stalker - A Slow-Burn, Spiritualistic, Science-Fiction Masterpiece

    MOVIE DISCUSSION:

    Stephen McFerron, Cinematic Doctrine's newest contributor (read him here!), joins Melvin to discuss Stalker, the popular Andrei Tarkovsky science-fiction classic!

    Topics:
    Introducing Stalker is equally simple (three men travel through a zone to find a room that grants one's greatest desire) and complex (constant philosophical debate, ruminations upon the terror of desire, and the intimidating presence of The Zone).Stephen, "I think it's about evangelism and the Christian walk - to some degree."Stalker is not only literally long, coming in at 162-minutes, it also can feel long with exceedingly drawn-out sequences, but Melvin feels these moments imitate the mundane periods in our life that help us think.The Zone that our characters traverse is not only depicted like a character itself, but a deity as well.The Zone demands respect if what it has to offer is to be obtained, something one may consider is similar to God Himself.Spiritualism and Christianity were largely prohibited in Russian film and art during 1979, and yet Tarkovsky cleverly depicts Christian symbolism, strife, and meditations throughout Stalker's runtime.One of Melvin's favorite aspects of Stalker is the two brief reprieves where characters sit down and talk directly to the audience, exposing their soul through poetic raison d'être.Melvin, "Stalker really wrestles with the concept, "You may think you know what you want, but what you want may not be what you wanted.""Evangelism is often a painfully slow, seemingly fruitless process. And yet it often helps orient the evangelist to God first and foremost, despite its subject being the Godless.Getting into the final monologue of the film delivered by the Stalker's wife, which kills Melvin.Sometimes with evangelistic pursuits we neglect to focus on one of our most rewarding responsibilities: the family.God permeates not just the spectacular but also the mundane. Is that not also joyful?Melvin believes there's a severe criticism of industrialization through a particular B-theme of Stalker.It seems there's a perpetual frustration between Russian artists and the Russian government. Stalker definitely includes some of that cultural tension.Recommendations:
    The Criterion Channel (Streaming Service)Elden Ring (Game)Support on Patreon for Unique Perks! 
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    • 1 hr 20 min
    The Bear (S1) - The Most Loving Show on Television

    The Bear (S1) - The Most Loving Show on Television

    PATREON TV-SHOW DISCUSSION:

    This TV-Show was selected by our Patreon Supporters over at the Cinematic Doctrine Patreon. Support as little as $3 a month and have your voice heard! 

    Melvin & Dan put on some no-slips and get to work talking about The Bear! Corner!

    Topics: 
    (PATREON EXCLUSIVE) 37-minutes of various topics: She-Hulk Episode 1 Twitter response, Warner Bros. can only afford to release two movies this year, and that nonsensical MoviePass revival (PATREON EXCLUSIVE) The Bear is mercifully efficient and accurately represents kitchen work. Melvin feels The Bear's realistic depiction of work-space experience and people relationships might actually so relatable that it becomes difficult to watch. Daniel has worked with coworkers just like some of the characters in The Bear.Melvin has an affinity and yearning for structure, so seeing a healthy and positive depiction of work and hierarchy in The Bear is greatly appreciated.Melvin jokingly says, "This is the most loving show I've seen... and I've seen The Chosen!" which heads into a retrospective on how Melvin & Dan have grown less fond of The Chosen since reviewing it in 2021.Talking about what makes Richard such a great, compelling character.The Bear has a really understated and kind way of depicting redemption and change, two things that require strong perseverance.Melvin kept thinking of both a Biblical and Cultural Christian perspective of The Bear's depiction of relationship strife and reconciliation, and how a Biblical approach to these issues will likely look different than a cultural Christian one.Recommendations: 
    ESV Student Study BibleJoe Pera Talks With You (Show)Only Murders in the Building (again) (Show)Support on Patreon for Unique Perks! 
    Early access to uncut episodes Vote on a movie/show we review Social Links: 
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    • 1 hr 25 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
16 Ratings

16 Ratings

Joelolsteen ,

The OTHER Christian movie podcast....this one has a Facebook group

Do you like movies??? Well do ya, punk!? Well do I have a podcast for you, with Melvin’s with it attitude and Christian background he’ll tell you what’s good and what’s not so good *cough* black panther *cough* also Melvin is a crackpot

SJake057 ,

Fascinating and Well Done

There are many Christian podcasts that cover and review media. But this show is set apart by being well-structured with professional recording and truly interesting conversation (not just rambling). And Chris Staron was a great guest!

Nikki Jamez ,

One of my Favorites

A great podcast with an incredibly friendly host, Cinematic Doctrine will both affirm and convict you in the way you consume media. Five stars for excellent criticism and a healthy dose of Christian wisdom!

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